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    • Hey,  I had Dietz he is a hatchet man. This guy said the same things on my c and p as yours. Over reporting the mmpi or whatever it is. He also said the same thing about the glitch in the system. That in my heart is not true. He just wants to say no. What he did to you he did to me. I was denied and am fighting it now. This guy needs exposed. He runs a business on the side called medpsych of the Rockies. They are a professional company that challenges workers comp and Ssdi claims. This guy has a major uncomfortable vibe about him. With his low lit office and facial manirisims. He had a private practice that failed. It brought in less than 100 grand in a very large city. Columbus.  In Chillicothe I ran into a veteran that had the very same experience. I also ran into two vso and a social worker. The guy Denys or underreports. He is doing a disservice to veterans. You do not have a personality disorder neither do I. My psychs and PTSD programs have me at chronic. Sleep sucks intrusive thoughts suck driving sucks. He is a piece of work. I researched this dude. He is no good, he needs dealt with because he has a generic way of turning vets down. Over reporting, personality disorder, and calling the dbq glitche in the system, I bet he never asked you a question in regard to the dbq. There is no glitche. He simply answered no in regard to PTSD symptoms. Then he rushes you out the office hands you a packet and walks off with a dirty look. Do not give up. Continue your treatment, if denied file a recon based on new evidence. You served and he called you a liar. Basically his c and p should not be used, he is stating he is incompetent by stating any decision would be speculative. This will catch up to him.  Glitche in the system my a**. LIAR VA HATCHET. 
    • Killemall, The Regional office used the examination for re-evaluation as the C&P.  I discovered this as it was annotated in my medical notes that I was able to view via Blue Button in MyHealEVet. The rating ended up being:
      50% Bi-Lateral Hearing Loss / Word Recognition
      10% Tinnitus
      =VA math 55%, rounded up to 60%.
      This is a fair and accurate representation of my SC hearing loss and how it effects my life and work. However, the PTSD-MST claim was denied without the use of a C&P, as I did not officially report the crime while in the Army back in 1984.  The rater simply made an incorrect decision, which was absolutely devastating to me.  I don't expect the rater to fully understand how this could happen to a man and not be officially reported. No one deserves to understand that first hand.  It took me a few months to write up a short statement of disagreement as instructed by my VSO.   Interestingly, the VA (Medical / Physiological) division of the US Government, consisting of Clinical Psychiatrists and other experts in the field, believe I need intensive and specific treatment for my PTSD-MST.  So on November 6th, I will be heading to another VA inpatient PTSD facility located in Virginia for seven weeks.   This particular program is a tertiary referral center which has a division that specializes specifically on male MST cases like mine, which the Regional Office rater said does not exist due to lack of documentation. This matter will now last for many more painful years and I vow to never give up, just like when this unthinkable crime against me was committed.  I apologize for going off topic. BTW, this is the place I am headed to in November:  http://www1.va.gov/directory/guide/facility.asp?ID=116    
    • I recently learned how donating blood was good for (many people, not everyone)  Men, especially, tend to have too much iron.  (Women lose Iron from menstration, so its rarely a problem for women to have too much iron)  If you have too much iron, its bad for your health, it can even be life threatening.   http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hemochromatosis/home/ovc-20167289 I was a bit suprised they would "take" my blood after I read about the health benefits of donating blood.   I answered all the questions honestly, and they took my blood.  They did a iron test, first, to see if my iron was low. (finger poke).    I donated blood locally, NOT through VA.   Remember, VA has to get you to sign a consent form to get medical information about you other than the VAMC's.      Here are a few health benefits of donating blood:  It reduces cancer risk, is heart healthy, and can be good for other organs also, especially for men with hi iron.   I read where "old blood" is "sticky" and tends to clot.  When you give blood, your body makes more "new" blood, which is slicker and is less likely to form blood clots.   Of course, you dont want to donate blood too often.  My area only allows you to donate whole blood every 56 days.  (2 months).    http://www.medicaldaily.com/why-donating-blood-good-your-health-246379
    • http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/copy-machine/n10022 "making copies", the Richmeister the copy machine guy, FWIW, Hamslice    
    • We dont know your PCP, so we dont know if she will help.  But, you need to seek treatment for ED for 2 reasons. First, for your wife, and secondly for the money.  (SMC K).  If you could do the Wild Monkey before the PTSD meds, and the Wild Monkey Dance is gone now, then that is a pretty obvious link.   If you want compensation for SMC K, you need it documented.  So you should start with your PCP.  If your PCP does not have experience/does not treat ED, then you should ask for a referral to someone who does.  





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rodsp

Compensation Question

5 posts in this topic

Has anyone had any experience with compensation award and implants? I recently had a Spinal Cord Stimulator permenantly implanted in my back and was wondering what type of compensation I would be looking at if any at all? thanks

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what was the disability associated with the implant? thanks

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I have not been rated. I retire in 7 months, I had a lumbar lamectimy previously for bulging disc protruding on nerve. Then scar tissue grew around the nerve and that is how I ended up with the implant. I am just trying to get an idea of what the VA usually awards because everyone I have asked so far has not ran into an implant situation. Thanks

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you may want to edit your topic to indicate you need help with your back ...this way members who are well versed in that area of disabilities will click on your thread and give there advice...

MT

here is a good site to read...http://www1.va.gov/vhapublications/ViewPublication.asp?pub_ID=337.

also here is the schedual of rating for the back

(va website for schedual of ratings

http://www.warms.vba.va.gov/bookc.html#d

THE SPINE

Rating

General Rating Formula for Diseases and Injuries of the Spine

(For diagnostic codes 5235 to 5243 unless 5243 is evaluated under the Formula for Rating

Intervertebral Disc Syndrome Based on Incapacitating Episodes):

With or without symptoms such as pain (whether or not it radiates), stiffness, or aching in the area of the spine affected by residuals of injury or disease

Unfavorable ankylosis of the entire spine 100

Unfavorable ankylosis of the entire thoracolumbar spine 50

Unfavorable ankylosis of the entire cervical spine; or, forward flexion

of the thoracolumbar spine 30 degrees or less; or, favorable ankylosis of

the entire thoracolumbar spine 40

Forward flexion of the cervical spine 15 degrees or less; or, favorable

ankylosis of the entire cervical spine 30

Forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine greater than 30 degrees but not

greater than 60 degrees; or, forward flexion of the cervical spine greater

than 15 degrees but not greater than 30 degrees; or, the combined range of

motion of the thoracolumbar spine not greater than 120 degrees; or, the

combined range of motion of the cervical spine not greater than 170 degrees;

or, muscle spasm or guarding severe enough to result in an abnormal gait

or abnormal spinal contour such as scoliosis, reversed lordosis, or

abnormal kyphosis 20

Forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine greater than 60 degrees but not

greater than 85 degrees; or, forward flexion of the cervical spine greater than

30 degrees but not greater than 40 degrees; or, combined range of motion of

the thoracolumbar spine greater than 120 degrees but not greater than 235

degrees; or, combined range of motion of the cervical spine greater than

170 degrees but not greater than 335 degrees; or, muscle spasm, guarding,

or localized tenderness not resulting in abnormal gait or abnormal spinal

contour; or, vertebral body fracture with loss of 50 percent or more of the

height 10

Note (1): Evaluate any associated objective neurologic abnormalities, including, but not limited to, bowel or bladder impairment, separately, under an appropriate diagnostic code.

Note (2): (See also Plate V.) For VA compensation purposes, normal forward flexion of the cervical spine is zero to 45 degrees, extension is zero to 45 degrees, left and right lateral flexion are zero to 45 degrees, and left and right lateral rotation are zero to 80 degrees. Normal forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine is zero to 90 degrees, extension is zero to 30 degrees, left and right lateral flexion are zero to 30 degrees, and left and right lateral rotation are zero to 30 degrees. The combined range of motion refers to the sum of the range of forward flexion, extension, left and right lateral flexion, and left and right rotation. The normal combined range of motion of the cervical spine is 340 degrees and of the thoracolumbar spine is 240 degrees. The normal ranges of motion for each component of spinal motion provided in this note are the maximum that can be used for calculation of the combined range of motion.

Note (3): In exceptional cases, an examiner may state that because of age, body habitus, neurologic disease, or other factors not the result of disease or injury of the spine, the range of motion of the spine in a particular individual should be considered normal for that individual, even though it does not conform to the normal range of motion stated in Note (2). Provided that the examiner supplies an explanation, the examiner’s assessment that the range of motion is normal for that individual will be accepted.

Note (4): Round each range of motion measurement to the nearest five degrees.

Note (5): For VA compensation purposes, unfavorable ankylosis is a condition in which the entire cervical spine, the entire thoracolumbar spine, or the entire spine is fixed in flexion or extension, and the ankylosis results in one or more of the following: difficulty walking because of a limited line of vision; restricted opening of the mouth and chewing; breathing limited to diaphragmatic respiration; gastrointestinal symptoms due to pressure of the costal margin on the abdomen; dyspnea or dysphagia; atlantoaxial or cervical subluxation or dislocation; or neurologic symptoms due to nerve root stretching. Fixation of a spinal segment in neutral position (zero degrees) always represents favorable ankylosis.

Note (6): Separately evaluate disability of the thoracolumbar and cervical spine segments, except when there is unfavorable ankylosis of both segments, which will be rated as a single disability.

5235 Vertebral fracture or dislocation

5236 Sacroiliac injury and weakness

5237 Lumbosacral or cervical strain

5238 Spinal stenosis

5239 Spondylolisthesis or segmental instability

5240 Ankylosing spondylitis

5241 Spinal fusion

5242 Degenerative arthritis of the spine (see also diagnostic code 5003)

5243 Intervertebral disc syndrome

Evaluate intervertebral disc syndrome (preoperatively or postoperatively) either under the General Rating Formula for Diseases and Injuries of the Spine or under the Formula for Rating Intervertebral Disc Syndrome Based on Incapacitating Episodes, whichever method results in the higher evaluation when all disabilities are combined under §4.25.

Formula for Rating Intervertebral Disc Syndrome Based on Incapacitating Episodes

With incapacitating episodes having a total duration of at least 6 weeks during the

past 12 months 60

With incapacitating episodes having a total duration of at least 4 weeks but less than

6 weeks during the past 12 months 40

With incapacitating episodes having a total duration of at least 2 weeks but less than

4 weeks during the past 12 months 20

With incapacitating episodes having a total duration of at least one week but less than

2 weeks during the past 12 months 10

Note (1): For purposes of evaluations under diagnostic code 5243, an incapacitating episode is a period of acute signs and symptoms due to intervertebral disc syndrome that requires bed rest prescribed by a physician and treatment by a physician.

Note (2): If intervertebral disc syndrome is present in more than one spinal segment, provided that the effects in each spinal segment are clearly distinct, evaluate each segment on the basis of incapacitating episodes or under the General Rating Formula for Diseases and Injuries of the Spine, whichever method results in a higher evaluation for that segment.

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Thanks I will retry.

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