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    • VHA Directive 2013-002 Quote from the directive: "(a) A “no wrong door” philosophy must be adopted to accommodate Veterans bringing a DBQ to a VHA facility. Veterans may ask their Primary Care Providers (PCPs) and Specialists to complete a DBQ for conditions which are already diagnosed and documented and for which the PCP or Specialist is treating the Veteran. DBQs can be completed during a routine office visit when there is sufficient time and the medical information is available. DBQs can also be completed outside of an office visit, or an appointment can be scheduled for completion. A DBQ completed by a PCP or Specialist is considered by VBA as medical evidence to support the Veteran’s claim. VHA DIRECTIVE 2013-002 January 14, 2013 3 (b) If the VHA clinician is not confident completing a DBQ or finds the DBQ requires diagnostic testing not indicated in the history or current symptoms, or would otherwise be inappropriate to complete, the VHA clinician must not complete the DBQ but assist the Veteran in filing a claim for disability benefits. Depending on local processes, this may include directing the Veteran to the Veterans On-Line Application (VONAPP); to the VA benefits call center at 1-800-827-1000; to a Veterans Service Organization representative; or to other local resources. (c) VHA clinicians who are not disability examiners may complete DBQs via the CAPRI or SMART programs, when available. DBQs may also be completed through the Web site: http://www.benefits.va.gov/TRANSFORMATION/disabilityexams/. If a paper version of a DBQ is presented by a Veteran for completion, staff must copy the completed form to scan into the Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS). The original DBQ form must be returned to the Veteran so that the Veteran can submit it to VBA.
    • Thanks, Inarticulate&distorted. My main goal is to get better but it seems it is just getting worse. I Tried to get my VA doctors to do this but they will not even touch it.  They told me they are not allowed to fill out this form. I have gotten letters from 4 private doctors that I have been seeing. I read my VA notes and it seems like they alway try to marginalize my condition. I do not trust them anymore and have been seeing private doctors. I just recently lost my government job because they though my symptom of my PTSD made me unfit to serve as a White Sands Security guard. I did leave on good terms and was able to get a letter from my director explaining why I could not work their anymore. I admitted to behavioral health hospital and the VA inpatient PTSD program. These programs are good but have a long term effect. I feel worse now than before I went to these programs. They only make you feel better temporary.  Thanks
    • No matter how you go about further please know this, ALWAYS rock the phUken Boat. Any VSO who tells you is a Schill for the VA. Trust me, get rid of him I don't care how "nice" or "efficient" he is.VSO's are like crabs, there's more out there.Never ever ever quit.
    • So, very importantly. If that Psychologist was NOT employed by the VA, you are already looking at an automatic denial. P.TS.D. is LITERALLY,  the only disease that the VA Claim system has this rule for. Sorry, facts is facts. Here's what you do, go to your closest VA Hospital, and get on a list to see a VA Psychologist, no outside contractor, don't settle for a "Counselor" or even a PSYCHIATRIST unless he also has a PhD in Psychology. Take the work you have now, read it, make sure you feel as both those reports accurately portray you, memorize it, then sit on it. It's worthless, never give the VA more than they ask for per Each single claim. What you do is get inside the system, be honest, don't lie to your VA Psychologist about those other Rex, but tell him you have a Psy Dx, but it's worthless for reasons of getting you yourr lawful compensation. If you are straight up with him in the front, he will remember, but now tou have to move on. Get your help from him, do as he asks.because not only are you fighting to get your Claim done correctly, but also the MAIN goal is to you better brother, Not PERFECT, but we are all here with you in the trenches. Good Luck

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robert51

Trying To Go To 100% Ptsd From 70 And Iu

31 posts in this topic

Just how hard is it to get to 100% for PTSD... I have a very good batch of private doctor reports going back to 2004 each year I get a new report and across the board they say Poor.... has anyone gotten 100% PTSD? I hope not but with the problems happening maybe us with 70% IU and SSD will get shafted on the IU so I want to test the waters... I have a total of 9 years of twice a month doctor visits the last 5 with a private doc... My chances are???????????

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Just how hard is it to get to 100% for PTSD... I have a very good batch of private doctor reports going back to 2004 each year I get a new report and across the board they say Poor.... has anyone gotten 100% PTSD? I hope not but with the problems happening maybe us with 70% IU and SSD will get shafted on the IU so I want to test the waters... I have a total of 9 years of twice a month doctor visits the last 5 with a private doc... My chances are???????????

If the medical evidence supports the 100% higher rating, then file a claim for increase, 38 CFR 3.160(f). Having 100% PTSD would enable you to file for special ratings down the road. ~Wings

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Unfortunately, you also have to be nearly totally incapacitated in every aspect of your life to get 100% for a adjustment or anxiety disorder. You should go to the mental health claim repository and look at the 100% criteria before filing the claim. It will also be much easier for the VA to reduce your compensation in the future if a single medical exam shows some improvement. It is much harder for them to reduce TDIU if you don't go back to work and send in your employment questionnaire every year. Don't wait on them to send it to you, print one off, fill it out, and send it in on your own.

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You can also seek extra-scheduler consideration.

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If you are rated IU you give up opportunity to get housebound. I sometimes think that it is best to get the rating and see where the chips fly. If you are rated 100% for PTSD then the VA is supposed to also consider you for HB which is another 300 some odd dollars a month. There are pros and cons to a schedular rating, and the same goes for TDIU. To me it is the same rating since no one I know with a 100% rating for PTSD or any mental disorder works, and part of that rating is not being able to work. I think they should make every TDIU vet 100% schedular. The VA used to make vets who could not work 100% schedular. Work is the main criteria they use to determine higher levels of disability for any emotional disorder. Also if you are not able to work and you are 100% schedular if the VA reduces you to 70% they are supposed to consider you for TDIU. If you are housebound then go for the 100% schedular since you deserve it. If you are housebound then by definition you are also 100%.

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TITLE 38--PENSIONS, BONUSES, AND VETERANS' RELIEF

CHAPTER I--DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRSPART 4--SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES

Subpart B--Disability Ratings

4.129 Mental disorders due to traumatic stress.

General Rating Formula for Mental Disorders:

Total occupational and social impairment, due to such symptoms as: gross impairment in thought processes or communication; persistent delusions or hallucinations; grossly inappropriate behavior; persistent danger of hurting self or others; intermittent inability to perform activities of daily living (including maintenance of minimal personal hygiene); disorientation to time or place; memory loss for names of close relatives, own occupation, or own name....................... 100%

Occupational and social impairment, with deficiencies in most areas, such as work, school, family relations, judgment, thinking, or mood, due to such symptoms as: suicidal ideation; obsessional rituals which interfere with routine activities; speech intermittently illogical, obscure, or irrelevant; near-continuous panic or depression affecting the ability to function independently, appropriately and effectively; impaired impulse control (such as unprovoked irritability with periods of violence); spatial disorientation; neglect of personal appearance and hygiene; difficulty in adapting to stressful circumstances (including work or a worklike setting); inability to establish and maintain effective relationships........................... 70%

Occupational and social impairment with reduced reliability and productivity due to such symptoms as: flattened affect; circumstantial, circumlocutory, or stereotyped speech; panic attacks more than once a week; difficulty in understanding complex commands; impairment of short- and long-term memory (e.g., retention of only highly learned material, forgetting to complete tasks); impaired judgment; impaired abstract thinking; disturbances of motivation and mood; difficulty in establishing and maintaining effective work and social relationships........... 50%

Occupational and social impairment with occasional decrease in work efficiency and intermittent periods of inability to perform occupational tasks (although generally functioning satisfactorily, with routine behavior, self-care, and conversation normal), due to such symptoms as: depressed mood, anxiety, suspiciousness, panic attacks (weekly or less often), chronic sleep impairment, mild memory loss (such as forgetting names, directions, recent events)........................................... 30%

Occupational and social impairment due to mild or transient symptoms which decrease work efficiency and ability to perform occupational tasks only during periods of significant stress, or; symptoms controlled by continuous medication............... 10%

A mental condition has been formally diagnosed, but symptoms are not severe enough either to interfere with occupational and social functioning or to require continuous medication..................... 0%

Edited by Commander Bob 92-93

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