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    • This is a must listen. Dr Cantrell is a very good advocate for all things PTSD .     http://www.blogtalkradio.com/haditcom/2016/08/26/bridget-c-cantrell-phd-is-an-award-winning-post-traumatic-stress-expert
    • I agree with J basser, If you were rated 90% IU  getting paid at the 100%  and also 70% for Depression =Meets the Criteria for SMC-S 1 Or if your were IU & Later got 70% Depression They should have gave you the statutory SMC-S- 1 H.B. Depression is a mental rating!  So it would be separate. jmo ........................Buck
    • Housebound is covered by the SMC level of S. Now SMC S can be achieved two ways. The first way is to be physically housebound. (A Doc must say you are) The second way to get it is to have a disability rated as Total and Have another or combination of disabilities totaling 60 percent. That is called Statutory Housebound.  Don't get confuses as the Regs say the word total and the VA likes to use the 100 percent issue but if you have IU for  a single condition and have another rating of 60 percent either single of combined, you should be OK.
    • Mine says about the same, 2018-2019.  I submitted several months before yours.  Complete BS!  I tried in person, and they said my file is "too big" to just print out for me.  Meanwhile, I have several contentions which will hit the one year mark since the decision in just a couple months.  How can I/we argue what they decided without knowing what they used to make the decision? 
    • I am a bit confused about the qualifications on this particular item.   I have read .. hell I can not even explain it as really because it confuses me that much so I am just going to be blunt.. would I qualify for consideration for housebound?  I stay at home most of the time as I am tired most of the time(sleep apnea)/spinal stenosis (which increases tremendously when I travel)/radiculopathy down both legs and anxiety issues. My fiance' does most of the chores around the house.  She would take me to VA appointments because I get easily distracted (because of pain) and basically easily upset when I drive, but she of course works so she can not. I have a total rating of 90% with TDIU 100% 70% for depression and the rest of my issues are various ranging from 30%'s/20%'s and a 10%.





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Pete53

Medicare Prescription Plan Is Confusing

7 posts in this topic

09:17 AM CDT on Monday, September 26, 2005

By BOB MOOS / The Dallas Morning News

The mailboxes of Medicare's 42 million beneficiaries will begin to bulge next week.

That's when seniors will start to receive sales brochures from insurers, pharmacies, pharmaceutical companies and others marketing prescription drug plans.

Medicare's new prescription drug benefit represents the most significant change in the federal program's 40-year history.

Yet, many older adults don't understand the new program, or they worry they won't come out ahead if they enroll in a drug plan.

"Whenever there's change, there's confusion and anxiety," says Khelan Bhatia, an advocate for AARP Texas. "But there's also opportunity."

Medicare administrator Mark McClellan expects the new drug benefit will cut many older Americans' prescription costs in half. And seniors with limited income and few resources will have almost no drug expenses.

The new benefit will come as welcome relief for many, he says. The average prices of dozens of prescription drugs used widely by seniors are rising more than twice as fast as general inflation, according to AARP.

"This coverage will help seniors afford the drugs they need to maintain or recover their good health," Dr. McClellan says.

JoAnn Walters, 78, of Dallas takes four prescriptions but doesn't know what she'll do.

"I have no idea whether the coverage would save me any money today, but you never know what your future will bring," she says.

Like other Medicare beneficiaries, Ms. Walters says she'll compare the drug plans to see if she can reduce her prescription costs.

"I've got some homework to do."

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the drug benefit, according to Medicare officials and others who work with seniors.

Must I enroll?

The benefit is voluntary. It's available to anyone on Medicare, regardless of health or income. But if you want the coverage, you'll have to enroll in one of the private insurance plans Medicare has approved.

Senior advocates add this cautionary note: If you wait and sign up for the drug benefit after the initial enrollment period ends May 15, you'll pay a penalty – an extra 1 percent in premiums for each month you delay.

"Even if you're healthy, you may want to get the coverage now," says Paul Zobisch, a Medicare volunteer. "You'd be insuring against what might happen later."

What if I already have prescription drug coverage?

Companies that provide retiree drug benefits will notify you whether their plans are at least as good as Medicare's.

If you have such coverage, you may want to keep it, says Robert Hayes, president of the Medicare Rights Center, a consumer group. As long as it's comparable to Medicare's benefits, you won't pay a penalty if you switch to Medicare later.

Medigap supplemental insurance policies are another story. Most that do cover prescriptions aren't as good as Medicare's coverage, so you'll pay a penalty if you enroll in a Medicare drug plan later, Mr. Hayes says.

"It's important to remember that Medicare's drug discount cards are ending, so you won't be able to rely on those any more," Mr. Bhatia says.

What will the drug benefit cost, and what will I get in return?

Your costs will depend on the plan you choose. Competition is driving premiums down – to less than $20 a month for some plans, from the $37 once projected.

After you pay the first $250 of your annual drug expenses, you'll be responsible for 25 percent of the next $2,000 in bills, all of the next $2,850, and 5 percent beyond that.

Some plans will offer more coverage for higher premiums, says Rod Clark, Medicare's outreach coordinator in Dallas.

Each plan will have its own list of covered drugs, both brand name and generic. Dr. McClellan assures seniors that every medically necessary drug must be covered.

Is extra help available for people with low incomes?

Yes. If your annual income is less than $14,355 and your assets are below $11,500, Medicare will pay almost all of your drug bills. (For couples, income can't be more than $19,245 and assets can't exceed $23,000.) If your income is slightly higher, you'll get a smaller break on your premiums, deductibles and co-payments.

If you now get Medicaid, a Medicare Savings Program subsidy or Supplemental Security Income, you automatically qualify for the additional help. Others on limited incomes will have to apply for it through Social Security.

"This is a no-brainer for anyone who thinks he qualifies," Mr. Hayes said says. "Run, don't walk, to apply."

But keep in mind that requesting the extra help won't enroll you in a plan, he says. You'll still need to select one.

Once I decide on the drug coverage, how do I find the best plan for me?

Texans will select from among 20 plans.

"Having so many choices is a good thing, but it can also be overwhelming," Mr. Zobisch says. "So take it a step at a time."

First, find a plan that covers all or most of your prescriptions.

If the plan you're considering doesn't cover one of your drugs, talk to your doctor to see if your medicine can be switched to one in the plan, AARP suggests.

If not, talk to the plan's sponsor to see if your circumstances make you eligible for an exception that pays for a drug not on the list.

Next, identify a plan that works with a pharmacy near your home. You may also be able to order drugs through the mail.

Finally, make sure you can afford the out-of-pocket expenses.

"Consider your choices carefully, because you generally won't be allowed to change plans for a year," Mr. Bhatia says.

How can I compare plans and enroll in one?

Medicare's Web site will let you compare drug plans' costs and benefits, beginning in mid-October. Visit www.medicare.gov and select the "search tools" option.

You may also call Medicare at 1-800-633-4227. When you do, have at hand your Medicare card, a list of the drugs you take and the name of your pharmacy.

The Medicare & You 2006 handbook will be mailed to every Medicare household in October and will also have a detailed listing of the plans in your area, Mr. Clark says.

Once you decide, you may sign up at Medicare's Web site or through its toll-free number. Or you may directly contact the plan you've chosen.

"Don't rush to judgment," Mr. Bhatia said says. "Even when enrollment begins Nov. 15, you'll still have six months to reach a decision. Consult a family member or trusted friend to help you consider your options."

E-mail bmoos@dallasnews.com

Benefit won't be delayed

A one-year delay in the Medicare prescription drug benefit has been proposed as a way of offsetting some of the rebuilding costs from Hurricane Katrina, but the White House and Republican congressional leaders are ruling that out.

The drug benefit is set to begin Jan. 1.

Fiscal conservatives from the Republican Study Committee proposed the postponement last week, saying it would save $30.8 billion of the estimated $200 billion in Katrina-related costs.

"Congress must ensure that a catastrophe of nature doesn't become a catastrophe of debt for our children and grandchildren," said Rep. Mike Pence, R-Ind., chairman of the GOP study group.

But the Bush administration and House Republican leaders quickly dismissed the idea.

"This is an important benefit for our seniors that will save them significant money on their prescription drugs," White House spokesman Scott McClellan said.

House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Sugar Land, called the proposed delay "a nonstarter."

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I think you can delay taking this plan if you have ChampVA or other drug coverage. I wonder if VA would act in the same way since we have coverage under VA for drugs. In other words you could just hold off on signing up for the plan without penalty.

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Using the VA is penalty enough. My HMO is making us use the plan. It sort of stinks but who knows?

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I don't plan on getting it. I get my Meds from VA and Tricare. Of course I wonder if they will close that loophole and make us take it someday.

Sort of like being forced to take Medicare over Tricare. Paying 3 times as much for the same thing I don't use.

Joy.....

:unsure:

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I don't plan on getting it. I get my Meds from VA and Tricare. Of course I wonder if they will close that loophole and make us take it someday.

Sort of like being forced to take Medicare over Tricare. Paying 3 times as much for the same thing I don't use.

Joy.....

:unsure:

If you have TRICARE or CHAMPVA stay with that. If you join Medicare you will have to pay the premium each month if you use it or not! I was told the premium is $45.00 per month. When you are on Medicare you can join any Medical Insurance Company of your choose. Some Medicare Insurance Companies Premium's are FREE. I have Health America Advantra with is free, I pay for part-B, I get my FREE meds by mail from ChampVA. You know the Medicare prescripton program is just another way for the goverment to help the rich and Drug Companies get richer. Don't you remember how much the Drug Co. spent the first six months, last year to pay the Lobbiest? I read that in ARAP, I think it was around $1,000,000.00. Any senior on medicare and has a limited income could apply for Healthy Herizon, this is a federal program, it passed Congress and became Law around the 1900's. This program provides payment of Medicare Part B premium for persons with limited resources whose incoome is more that 100% but less than 120% of the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines. There are other programs where the income is much higher! In the State of Pennsylvsnia the County Assistance Office is where you apply or you can go to the Area Agency on Aging.

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09:17 AM CDT on Monday, September 26, 2005

By BOB MOOS / The Dallas Morning News

The mailboxes of Medicare's 42 million beneficiaries will begin to bulge next week.

That's when seniors will start to receive sales brochures from insurers, pharmacies, pharmaceutical companies and others marketing prescription drug plans.

Medicare's new prescription drug benefit represents the most significant change in the federal program's 40-year history.

Yet, many older adults don't understand the new program, or they worry they won't come out ahead if they enroll in a drug plan.

"Whenever there's change, there's confusion and anxiety," says Khelan Bhatia, an advocate for AARP Texas. "But there's also opportunity."

Medicare administrator Mark McClellan expects the new drug benefit will cut many older Americans' prescription costs in half. And seniors with limited income and few resources will have almost no drug expenses.

The new benefit will come as welcome relief for many, he says. The average prices of dozens of prescription drugs used widely by seniors are rising more than twice as fast as general inflation, according to AARP.

"This coverage will help seniors afford the drugs they need to maintain or recover their good health," Dr. McClellan says.

JoAnn Walters, 78, of Dallas takes four prescriptions but doesn't know what she'll do.

"I have no idea whether the coverage would save me any money today, but you never know what your future will bring," she says.

Like other Medicare beneficiaries, Ms. Walters says she'll compare the drug plans to see if she can reduce her prescription costs.

"I've got some homework to do."

Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about the drug benefit, according to Medicare officials and others who work with seniors.

Must I enroll?

The benefit is voluntary. It's available to anyone on Medicare, regardless of health or income. But if you want the coverage, you'll have to enroll in one of the private insurance plans Medicare has approved.

Senior advocates add this cautionary note: If you wait and sign up for the drug benefit after the initial enrollment period ends May 15, you'll pay a penalty – an extra 1 percent in premiums for each month you delay.

"Even if you're healthy, you may want to get the coverage now," says Paul Zobisch, a Medicare volunteer. "You'd be insuring against what might happen later."

What if I already have prescription drug coverage?

Companies that provide retiree drug benefits will notify you whether their plans are at least as good as Medicare's.

If you have such coverage, you may want to keep it, says Robert Hayes, president of the Medicare Rights Center, a consumer group. As long as it's comparable to Medicare's benefits, you won't pay a penalty if you switch to Medicare later.

Medigap supplemental insurance policies are another story. Most that do cover prescriptions aren't as good as Medicare's coverage, so you'll pay a penalty if you enroll in a Medicare drug plan later, Mr. Hayes says.

"It's important to remember that Medicare's drug discount cards are ending, so you won't be able to rely on those any more," Mr. Bhatia says.

What will the drug benefit cost, and what will I get in return?

Your costs will depend on the plan you choose. Competition is driving premiums down – to less than $20 a month for some plans, from the $37 once projected.

After you pay the first $250 of your annual drug expenses, you'll be responsible for 25 percent of the next $2,000 in bills, all of the next $2,850, and 5 percent beyond that.

Some plans will offer more coverage for higher premiums, says Rod Clark, Medicare's outreach coordinator in Dallas.

Each plan will have its own list of covered drugs, both brand name and generic. Dr. McClellan assures seniors that every medically necessary drug must be covered.

Is extra help available for people with low incomes?

Yes. If your annual income is less than $14,355 and your assets are below $11,500, Medicare will pay almost all of your drug bills. (For couples, income can't be more than $19,245 and assets can't exceed $23,000.) If your income is slightly higher, you'll get a smaller break on your premiums, deductibles and co-payments.

If you now get Medicaid, a Medicare Savings Program subsidy or Supplemental Security Income, you automatically qualify for the additional help. Others on limited incomes will have to apply for it through Social Security.

"This is a no-brainer for anyone who thinks he qualifies," Mr. Hayes said says. "Run, don't walk, to apply."

But keep in mind that requesting the extra help won't enroll you in a plan, he says. You'll still need to select one.

Once I decide on the drug coverage, how do I find the best plan for me?

Texans will select from among 20 plans.

"Having so many choices is a good thing, but it can also be overwhelming," Mr. Zobisch says. "So take it a step at a time."

First, find a plan that covers all or most of your prescriptions.

If the plan you're considering doesn't cover one of your drugs, talk to your doctor to see if your medicine can be switched to one in the plan, AARP suggests.

If not, talk to the plan's sponsor to see if your circumstances make you eligible for an exception that pays for a drug not on the list.

Next, identify a plan that works with a pharmacy near your home. You may also be able to order drugs through the mail.

Finally, make sure you can afford the out-of-pocket expenses.

"Consider your choices carefully, because you generally won't be allowed to change plans for a year," Mr. Bhatia says.

How can I compare plans and enroll in one?

Medicare's Web site will let you compare drug plans' costs and benefits, beginning in mid-October. Visit www.medicare.gov and select the "search tools" option.

You may also call Medicare at 1-800-633-4227. When you do, have at hand your Medicare card, a list of the drugs you take and the name of your pharmacy.

The Medicare & You 2006 handbook will be mailed to every Medicare household in October and will also have a detailed listing of the plans in your area, Mr. Clark says.

Once you decide, you may sign up at Medicare's Web site or through its toll-free number. Or you may directly contact the plan you've chosen.

"Don't rush to judgment," Mr. Bhatia said says. "Even when enrollment begins Nov. 15, you'll still have six months to reach a decision. Consult a family member or trusted friend to help you consider your options."

E-mail bmoos@dallasnews.com

Benefit won't be delayed

A one-year delay in the Medicare prescription drug benefit has been proposed as a way of offsetting some of the rebuilding costs from Hurricane Katrina, but the White House and Republican congressional leaders are ruling that out.

The drug benefit is set to begin Jan. 1.

Fiscal conservatives from the Republican Study Committee proposed the postponement last week, saying it would save $30.8 billion of the estimated $200 billion in Katrina-related costs.

"Congress must ensure that a catastrophe of nature doesn't become a catastrophe of debt for our children and grandchildren," said Rep. Mike Pence, R-Ind., chairman of the GOP study group.

But the Bush administration and House Republican leaders quickly dismissed the idea.

"This is an important benefit for our seniors that will save them significant money on their prescription drugs," White House spokesman Scott McClellan said.

House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Sugar Land, called the proposed delay "a nonstarter."

The medical industry will make alot of money on a questionable benefit.

B)

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