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  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

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    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

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Berta

Wannabee Vet

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Courtesy Mike Harris: (PS-my opinion only- but I would not want him near my husband's grave at all)

"Fake vet sentenced to tend military graves at Tahoma

By MIKE BARBER

P-I REPORTER

For pretending that he was a decorated U.S. military veteran, 59-year-old Reggie L. Buddle of Puyallup must tend to the graves of those who really were.

Reggie L. Buddle of Puyallup, standing in the khaki shirt, during the 2006 opening ceremony for the Washington State Senate. (Photo provided by U.S. Attorney's office)

U.S. Magistrate Kelly Arnold in U.S. District Court in Tacoma on Monday sentenced the counterfeit Vietnam vet to two years' probation and 500 hours laboring at Tahoma National Cemetery for posing as a decorated U.S. Marine captain and military chaplain in 2005 and 2006.

Buddle, who never was in the Marine Corps, plead guilty in April to unlawful wearing of U.S. military medals and decorations. That followed an investigation by the inspector general of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

After the hearing, Buddle, who served two years as an Army enlisted man but never in combat and never earning any of the medals he wore, apologized in court Monday and said he was ashamed, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Seattle.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Ron Friedman said such cases, which have been growing nationwide since Congress passed stiffer measures 18 months ago against pretending to be a member of the armed forces, were researched to recommend an appropriate sentence.

"In this case, we thought it was a good idea to teach him what true service is like," Friedman said.

When Buddle begins serving those who rest at the national military cemetery in Kent, he must avoid any interaction with families of veterans.

"The court expressed concern that he not be allowed to participate in any funerals or counseling sessions or any other type of matters at the cemetery. That was part of his underlying crime; it was clear he will be there to supply labor," Friedman said.

Though Buddle was never an ordained chaplain or reverend, nor authorized by state law to act in any such capacity, he officiated at servicemen's funerals, weddings and baptisms.

Friedman said state statutes were researched and found to protect the legitimacy of marriages in such instances.

Buddle even hoodwinked the state Senate.

On Feb. 27, 2006, dressed in a Marine Corps uniform replete with the rank and medals he awarded himself, Buddle stood before the Senate and gave the prayer at the opening ceremony. Not everyone was so certain that Buddle was the real item. Doubters called authorities, who began investigating.

Among the unearned medals and service decorations with which Buddle festooned his uniform were those for valor and service in Vietnam; a Combat Action Ribbon authorized for wear by those who have fought enemy forces; a Presidential Unit Citation ribbon, issued to members of units that displayed extraordinary heroism under fire; and the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, a high-ranking medal authorized for "extraordinary" contribution to national defense.

Real Marines and their families seemed satisfied with the sentence.

Bert Rutan, 84, retired pastor at University Congregational Church in Seattle and a Marine who in 1945 received the Silver Star for his actions on Iwo Jima, called the sentence "a fair thing. It has to be publicly known that (posing as a member of the armed forces) is not something you can do."

In Snohomish, Brian and Shellie Starr, whose son, Marine Cpl. Jeff Starr, was killed in combat in Iraq on Memorial Day 2005, said the sentence is appropriate.

"I'm glad they nailed him," Brian Starr said.

"I think for someone to impersonate somebody who has done this voluntarily, with the potential for risk of life, is terrible."

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/325655...ource=rss"

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Beats me how anyone who served any time at all would do this. I think that he got off light and I also think that the Judge should have consulted with relatives. Maybe 500 hours KP in a VAMC Kitchen would be more appropriate.

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Courtesy Mike Harris: (PS-my opinion only- but I would not want him near my husband's grave at all)

"Fake vet sentenced to tend military graves at Tahoma

By MIKE BARBER

P-I REPORTER

For pretending that he was a decorated U.S. military veteran, 59-year-old Reggie L. Buddle of Puyallup must tend to the graves of those who really were.

Reggie L. Buddle of Puyallup, standing in the khaki shirt, during the 2006 opening ceremony for the Washington State Senate. (Photo provided by U.S. Attorney's office)

U.S. Magistrate Kelly Arnold in U.S. District Court in Tacoma on Monday sentenced the counterfeit Vietnam vet to two years' probation and 500 hours laboring at Tahoma National Cemetery for posing as a decorated U.S. Marine captain and military chaplain in 2005 and 2006.

Buddle, who never was in the Marine Corps, plead guilty in April to unlawful wearing of U.S. military medals and decorations. That followed an investigation by the inspector general of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

After the hearing, Buddle, who served two years as an Army enlisted man but never in combat and never earning any of the medals he wore, apologized in court Monday and said he was ashamed, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Seattle.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Ron Friedman said such cases, which have been growing nationwide since Congress passed stiffer measures 18 months ago against pretending to be a member of the armed forces, were researched to recommend an appropriate sentence.

"In this case, we thought it was a good idea to teach him what true service is like," Friedman said.

When Buddle begins serving those who rest at the national military cemetery in Kent, he must avoid any interaction with families of veterans.

"The court expressed concern that he not be allowed to participate in any funerals or counseling sessions or any other type of matters at the cemetery. That was part of his underlying crime; it was clear he will be there to supply labor," Friedman said.

Though Buddle was never an ordained chaplain or reverend, nor authorized by state law to act in any such capacity, he officiated at servicemen's funerals, weddings and baptisms.

Friedman said state statutes were researched and found to protect the legitimacy of marriages in such instances.

Buddle even hoodwinked the state Senate.

On Feb. 27, 2006, dressed in a Marine Corps uniform replete with the rank and medals he awarded himself, Buddle stood before the Senate and gave the prayer at the opening ceremony. Not everyone was so certain that Buddle was the real item. Doubters called authorities, who began investigating.

Among the unearned medals and service decorations with which Buddle festooned his uniform were those for valor and service in Vietnam; a Combat Action Ribbon authorized for wear by those who have fought enemy forces; a Presidential Unit Citation ribbon, issued to members of units that displayed extraordinary heroism under fire; and the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, a high-ranking medal authorized for "extraordinary" contribution to national defense.

Real Marines and their families seemed satisfied with the sentence.

Bert Rutan, 84, retired pastor at University Congregational Church in Seattle and a Marine who in 1945 received the Silver Star for his actions on Iwo Jima, called the sentence "a fair thing. It has to be publicly known that (posing as a member of the armed forces) is not something you can do."

In Snohomish, Brian and Shellie Starr, whose son, Marine Cpl. Jeff Starr, was killed in combat in Iraq on Memorial Day 2005, said the sentence is appropriate.

"I'm glad they nailed him," Brian Starr said.

"I think for someone to impersonate somebody who has done this voluntarily, with the potential for risk of life, is terrible."

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/325655...ource=rss"

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I just want to know if these scammers can get VA to give them awards for disabilities.Is it possible for them to dupe the VA?

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What kills me is that the phonies always claim to have been in Special Forces, served four tours in Vietnam, multiple silver stars, purple hearts etc. I know one of these guys and I did some research on him and he was just lying about most everything.

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Guest Dataman

No KP In the VA Hosp Kitchen please. The Green Jello and Hot Water and soup Is all I got the week I was in (May 2002). And all the drugs of course.

God that 1st Pizza was nice when I could finally eat (last day I was there I sent for delivery).

Plenty of Fake Vets out there.

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