Jump to content


  • veteranscrisisline-badge-chat-1.gif

  • Advertisemnt

  • Trouble Remembering? This helped me.

    I have memory problems and as some of you may know I highly recommend Evernote and have for years. Though I've found that writing helps me remember more. I ran across Tom's videos on youtube, I'm a bit geeky and I also use an IPad so if you take notes on your IPad or you are thinking of going paperless check it out. I'm really happy with it, I use it with a program called Noteshelf 2.

    Click here to purchase your digital journal. HadIt.com receives a commission on each purchase.

  • 14 Questions about VA Disability Compensation Benefits Claims

    questions-001@3x.png

    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
    Continue Reading
     
  • Ads

  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

    tinnitus-005.pngptsd-005.pnglumbosacral-005.pngscars-005.pnglimitation-flexion-knee-005.pngdiabetes-005.pnglimitation-motion-ankle-005.pngparalysis-005.pngdegenerative-arthitis-spine-005.pngtbi-traumatic-brain-injury-005.png

  • Advertisemnt

  • VA Watchdog

  • Advertisemnt

  • Ads

  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

    employment 2.jpeg

    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

Sign in to follow this  
Pete53

Lap Band Or Gastric Surgery For Weight Loss

Recommended Posts

LOS ANGELES - The first long-term studies of stomach stapling and

other radical obesity treatments show that they not only lead to lasting

weight loss but also dramatically improve survival. The results are

expected to lead to more such operations, possibly for less severely obese

people, too.

Researchers in Sweden and the United States separately found that

obese people who underwent drastic surgery had a 30 percent to 40 percent

lower risk of dying seven to 10 years later compared with those who did

not have such operations.

The research, published in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine,

should put to rest uncertainties about the benefits and risks of

weight-loss surgery and may cause governments and insurers to rethink who

should qualify for the procedure, some doctors said.

Also Online Link: New England Journal

Link: Body Mass Index calculator

"It's going to dispel the notion that bariatric surgery is cosmetic

surgery and support the notion that it saves lives," said Dr. Philip

Schauer, director of bariatric surgery at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, who

had no role in the research.

Obesity surgeries have surged in recent years along with global

waistlines. In the United States alone, 177,600 operations were performed

last year, according to the American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric

Surgery. The most common method was gastric bypass, or stomach-stapling

surgery, which reduces the stomach to a small walnut-sized pouch and

bypasses part of the small intestine where digestion occurs.

The Swedish study is the longest look yet at how obesity surgery

affects mortality.

Researchers led by Dr. Lars Sjostrom of Goteborg University compared

4,047 people with a body-mass index over 34 who had one of three types

of surgery or received standard diet advice. BMI is a standard measure

of height and weight and a BMI over 30 is considered obese.

After a decade, those in the surgery group lost 14 percent to 25

percent of their original weight compared to 2 percent in the other group.

Of the 2,010 surgery patients, 101 died. There were 129 deaths in the

comparison group of 2,037 people.

In the U.S. study, Ted Adams of the University of Utah led a team that

looked at 7,925 severely obese people in the state who had gastric

bypass. They were matched with similar people who did not have the

operation and who were selected through their driver's license records listing

height and weight.

After an average of seven years' follow-up, 213 people who had surgery

died compared to 321 who did not have the procedure. The study did not

look at weight loss.

Deaths from diabetes in the surgery group were dramatically cut by 92

percent; from cancer by 60 percent and from heart disease by 56

percent. Surprisingly, the surgery group had a higher risk of death from

accidents, suicides and other causes not related to disease. The researchers

were puzzled by this.

Both studies were done before surgery advances that have led to

smaller incisions and faster recovery time. Experts say future long-term

survival rates from obesity surgery should be even better.

While neither study was the gold standard test, where patients are

randomly given one treatment or another, surgery's dramatic benefits make

it ethically hard to deny patients the operation, said Dr. George Bray

of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center at Louisiana State

University.

Herb Olitsky, a 53-year-old business owner from New York City, credits

his improved lifestyle to gastric bypass.

A diabetic, Olitsky was given months to live after developing a

life-threatening bacterial infection near his heart muscles.

Olitsky, who stands 5 feet 8 inches, underwent stomach-stapling

surgery in 1999 and went from 520 pounds to his current weight of 160. He no

longer struggles to walk a quarter block and has managed to control his

blood pressure and heart rate.

"I knew I had to get it and that's what's kept me alive," Olitsky

said. "I'm healthier now than I've ever been."

More than 400 million people worldwide are obese and surgery is the

only proven method to shed significant pounds in a short time. In the

United States, it costs $17,000 to $35,000 and insurance coverage varies.

Weight-loss surgery is considered relatively safe with the risk of

death from the surgery at less than 1 percent. Common complications

include nutritional deficiency, gallstones and hernia.

U.S. guidelines recommend that surgery be considered only after

traditional ways to slim down have failed. Candidates must be at least 100

pounds overweight and have a BMI over 40, or a BMI over 35 plus an

obesity-related medical condition such as diabetes or high blood pressure.

This fall, a panel of experts from the National Institutes of Health

will revisit the obesity surgery guidelines. It's not yet known whether

a BMI change would be considered, said spokeswoman Susan Dambrauskas.

Susan Pisano, a spokeswoman for America's Health Insurance Plans,

which represents 1,300 insurers, said the group will rely on any new

recommendations from the federal government.

The Sweden study was paid for by the government-funded Swedish Medical

Research Council, drug makers Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. and AstraZeneca

PLC and Cederroth, which makes health care products. The U.S. study was

supported by an NIH branch; one of the researchers has received a

lecture fee from a company that makes equipment for obesity surgery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey pete here in the Philippines i met a guy who just had a lap band august 2 and he paid less then 8,000 total .... the same doctor who has done over 15 of these operations says even the by pass one is under 10,000 ..my friend says he has shed 35 lbs so far....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Robert if I can get cleared for the surgery it will cost me 100 bucks using my Medicare HMO. I have been trying to get it done for almost a year. I have lost 22 lbs on my own in 1 year though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pete: I hope you can get it done. I had it done May 2005 ( BYPass) and have lost 150. My HMO would not pay for it but medicare did. Out of pocket it cost me $1300. My life has changed, My health overall is better. And once again I feel Sexy and Happy. I love the comments I recieve, Although I would like to lose 10 more everyone tells me I shouldn't because I look good now. If you have it done take a picture of yourself the morning of surgery and then every 3 months after for a year and you will be amased to see yourself and happy to show those pictures off. Join the support group if you have one in your area. don't be afraid of trying different foods, just be aware of what makes you sick and stay away from them. For me I can not eat anything cooked on a grill or anything too spicy. certain barbacue sauces have to much sugar in them so watch out for that. Otherwise today, I can eat anything else. Just be aware of what your stomache is telling you, I go out to eat and thinking I am starved start to eat and after a few bites of food my stomache will let me know that I am full. I know look at what people put on their plates and think " I use to eat that much" Sometimes I feel jeaulos but would not change anything. Its mind over matter.

Good Luck to You

JohnM's Wife Dianne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Diane:

I am gearing up to try to get approved again. It requires another stress test :) and ok from cardiologist. I will call Monday to start the appointments. My Lap Band Doc made the news a couple of weeks ago offering a free procedure for a man who weighed 500 lbs and a Judge denied him the right to adopt a kid. The Judge told the man he could not place a child whoes father was going to die soon.

Congrats on your success and confirmation that I can do it. My goal is 60 to 100 and even 40 would be better. I have lost 22 lbs on my own and it is hell.

Edited by Pete53

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By L2dee2
      I was diagnosed with Diabetes type 2 on 2 Mar 10,  my last day on active duty was 28 Feb 09. I was denied service connection when I filed since I was officially diagnosed 3 days outside the 1 year window.  I never appealed this claim.  I was rated 60% in 2010 and never looked back.
      I recently happened across this site and realized, I might be able to reopen the case and submit a nexus letter stating that the diabetes manifested within the one year of me leaving active duty if not before.  Lab test taken on 25 Feb 09 show a Glucose reading of 324.  For some reason HB A1C test wasn't take until 2 Mar 10.  My HB A1C was 12.5.  The 2 Mar 10 date puts me inside the 1 year window.  There is no way my diabetes appeared in 3 days after the 1 year window.
      I am also service connected with Hypothyrodism (Hashimotos) which caused weight gain and slows the metabolism.  I was diagnosed in 1998.  Some medical evidence also shows slow thyroid can cause Diabetes.  Due to weight gain from my underactive thyroid, I was clinically obese on active duty.    If I can't get Diabetes added by showing it is service connected, maybe I can add it as a secondary to my Hypothyrodisim.  What are your thoughts?
       
    • By clynch726
      I am looking for anyone who was on Kadena AFB, Okinawa or .Chanute AFB, IL. My dad was there from Oct. 68-April 70. He has ichemic heart disease, diabetes which has resulted in the amputation of his right leg below the knee and peripheral neuropathy. We were denied in 2002 AMVETS filed a claim on his behalf for heart condition, diabetes and back problems. I refiled in December 2011 and have just received the claim statements and medical release forms. I am familiar with filling out this paper work because my husband is a combat veteran of Iraqi Freedom. I have been reading articles from the Japan times and I am a member of the Agent Orange Okinawa facebook page. Another thing that helps make my dad's case is that he was on Chanute AFB, IL and it is on the EPA Superfund list and has PCBs/Pesticides and Dioxins/Furans listed as ground and water contaminants. I welcome any advice, tips or articles that I may have missed in my own research.
    • By pctinc2001
      I suffered a back injury while in the ARMY years ago. My back has continuously given me problems. I am SC for DDD and was wondering how can i go about service connecting Diabetes 2? Any information or case studies will be of great help. 
    • By VETOVET
      Please, welcome new VET2VET podcast episode:
      https://youtu.be/waV5t0HPtbM
      Today we are joined by Thomas Wendel, DAV National area supervisor for West Cost Region.
      Thomas E. Wendel served in the U. S. Marine Corps from 1983 until 1997.
      Since 1999, Tom has worked assisting veterans in processing various entitlement claims on the local, state and federal levels; first in Clare County as a county service officer and then when he came to work for the Disabled American Veterans in 2000. In 2008 he was promoted to the position of supervisor of the DAV Service Office in Detroit and later he was promoted to the position of supervisor of the DAV National area for West Cost Region.
      DAV is America’s largest, most effective veterans service organizations dedicated to the needs of those injured, ill or wounded in service. We have more than 1,300 Chapters in communities nationwide to help make sure veterans from all generations and their families get the benefits and support they deserve. Today, nearly 1.3 million veterans belong to DAV, and we encourage you to add your voice to the cause. Our programs and free services help all veterans get the health, disability and financial benefits they earned. Take advantage of our benefits claims assistance, medical transportation and employment resources. Your local DAV Chapter is a great way to connect with fellow veterans in your area.
      ★ JOIN US IN OUR COMMITMENT TO YOU AND OUR FELLOW VETERANS ★
      ▶ facebook.com/VETOVET2
      ▶ itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/vet2vet/id1077206523?mt=2
      ▶ twitter.com/VETOVET2
      ▶ youtube.com/c/VETOVET2
      ▶ plus.google.com/u/0/+VETOVET2
      ▶ goo.gl/app/playmusic?ibi=com.google.PlayMusic&isi=691797987&ius=googleplaymusic&link=https://play.google.com/music/m/Iiqawbuzg7eviiyqm6xz7kju62m?t%3DVET2VET
      ▶ feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:198832065/sounds.rss
      ▶ soundcloud.com/vet2vet
      ▶ stitcher.com/s?fid=80842&refid=stpr
       
      ★ LIMITED LIABILITY CLAUSE ★
       
      THE INFORMATION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE VET2VET MAY INCLUDE INACCURACIES OR ERRORS. CHANGES ARE PERIODICALLY ADDED TO THE INFORMATION HEREIN. VET2VET MAY MAKE IMPROVEMENTS AND/OR CHANGES OF THE CONTENT AT ANY TIME. ADVICE RECEIVED VIA VET2VET SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON FOR PERSONAL, MEDICAL, LEGAL OR FINANCIAL DECISIONS AND YOU SHOULD CONSULT AN APPROPRIATE PROFESSIONAL FOR SPECIFIC ADVICE TAILORED TO YOUR SITUATION.
       
      IF YOU ARE DISSATISFIED WITH ANY PORTION OF VET2VET, YOUR SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY IS TO DISCONTINUE CONSULTING VET2VET.
       
    • By VETOVET
      Please, welcome new VET2VET podcast episode:
      https://youtu.be/9paX1-FyCaI
       
      Today we’re talking about SERVICE CONNECTION.
      When we talk about service-connecting a medical condition, disease, injury or illness to military service, we are talking about proving the relationship between the two.
      1) Direct Service Connection
      2) Service Connection by Aggravation
      3) Presumptive Service Connection
      4) Secondary Service Connection
      5) Service Connection due to Injury Caused by Treatment in the VA Healthcare System
      6) Special Service Connection Rules for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
      ★ JOIN US IN OUR COMMITMENT TO YOU AND OUR FELLOW VETERANS ★
      ▶ facebook.com/VETOVET2
      ▶ itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/vet2vet/id1077206523?mt=2
      ▶ twitter.com/VETOVET2
      ▶ youtube.com/c/VETOVET2
      ▶ plus.google.com/u/0/+VETOVET2
      ▶ goo.gl/app/playmusic?ibi=com.google.PlayMusic&isi=691797987&ius=googleplaymusic&link=https://play.google.com/music/m/Iiqawbuzg7eviiyqm6xz7kju62m?t%3DVET2VET
      ▶ feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:198832065/sounds.rss
      ▶ soundcloud.com/vet2vet
      ▶ stitcher.com/s?fid=80842&refid=stpr
       
      ★ LIMITED LIABILITY CLAUSE ★
       
      THE INFORMATION AVAILABLE THROUGH THE VET2VET MAY INCLUDE INACCURACIES OR ERRORS. CHANGES ARE PERIODICALLY ADDED TO THE INFORMATION HEREIN. VET2VET MAY MAKE IMPROVEMENTS AND/OR CHANGES OF THE CONTENT AT ANY TIME. ADVICE RECEIVED VIA VET2VET SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON FOR PERSONAL, MEDICAL, LEGAL OR FINANCIAL DECISIONS AND YOU SHOULD CONSULT AN APPROPRIATE PROFESSIONAL FOR SPECIFIC ADVICE TAILORED TO YOUR SITUATION.
       
      IF YOU ARE DISSATISFIED WITH ANY PORTION OF VET2VET, YOUR SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY IS TO DISCONTINUE CONSULTING VET2VET.
       
  • Ads

  • Our picks

    • Tinnitus comes in two forms: subjective and objective. In subjective tinnitus, only the sufferer will hear the ringing in their own ears. In objective tinnitus, the sound can be heard by a doctor who is examining the ear canals. Objective tinnitus is extremely rare, while subjective tinnitus is by far the most common form of the disorder.

      The sounds of tinnitus may vary with the person experiencing it. Some will hear a ringing, while others will hear a buzzing. At times people may hear a chirping or whistling sound. These sounds may be constant or intermittent. They may also vary in volume and are generally more obtrusive when the sufferer is in a quiet environment. Many tinnitus sufferers find their symptoms are at their worst when they’re trying to fall asleep.

      ...................Buck
        • Like
    • Precedent Setting CAVC cases cited in the M21-1
      A couple months back before I received my decision I started preparing for the appeal I knew I would be filing.  That is how little faith I had in the VA caring about we the veteran. 

      One of the things I did is I went through the entire M21-1 and documented every CAVC precedent case that the VA cited. I did this because I wanted to see what the rater was seeing.  I could not understand for the life of me why so many obviously bad decisions were being handed down.  I think the bottom line is that the wrong type of people are hired as raters.  I think raters should have some kind of legal background.  They do not need to be lawyers but I think paralegals would be a good idea.

      There have been more than 3500 precedent setting decisions from the CAVC since 1989.  Now we need to concede that all of them are not favorable to the veteran but I have learned that in a lot of cases even though the veteran lost a case it some rules were established that assisted other veterans.

      The document I created has about 200 or so decisions cited in the M21-1.   Considering the fact that there are more than 3500 precedent cases out there I think it is safe to assume the VA purposely left out decisions that would make it almost impossible to deny veteran claims.  Case in point. I know of 14 precedent setting decisions that state the VA cannot ignore or give no weight to outside doctors without providing valid medical reasons as to why.  Most of these decision are not cited by the M21.

      It is important that we do our due diligence to make sure we do not get screwed.  I think the M21-1 is incomplete because there is too much information we veterans are finding on our own to get the benefits we deserve

      M21-1 Precedent setting decisions .docx
        • Thanks
        • Like
      • 5 replies
    • Any one heard of this , I filed a claim for this secondary to hypertension, I had a echo cardiogram, that stated the diagnosis was this heart disease. my question is what is the rating for this. attached is the Echo.

      doc00580220191213082945.pdf
      • 7 replies
    • Need your support - T-shirts Available - Please buy a mug or a membership
      if you have been thinking about subscribing to an ad-free forum or buying a mug now would a very helpful time to do that.

      Thank you for your support
      • 18 replies
    • OK everyone thanks for all the advice I need your help I called VSO complained about length of time on Wednesday of this week today I checked my E benefits and my ratings are in for my ankles that they were denying me 10% for each bilateral which makes 21% I was originally 80% now they’re still saying I’m 80% 

      I’m 50% pes planus 30% migraine headaches 20% lumbar 10% tinnitus and now bilateral 21% so 10% left and right ankle Can someone else please do the math because I come up with 86% which makes me 90 what am I missing please help and thank you
  • Ads

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ad

  • Latest News
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

{terms] and Guidelines