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Tinnitus Claim.


Chazman1946

Question

I was a USMC Combat Engineer (tunnel rat) in Viet Nam and had both of my eardrums blown out while setting off a satchel charge on Operation Orange 1966.

I was medivaced for this to Okinawa for treatment.

I have had constant ringing in both of my ears from this for almost 40 years.

I had tried to make a claim on this back in the early 70's with the VA and they gave me zip, zero, nada.

I put in for another compensation claim for agent orange (Diabetes) about three years ago and was granted that one for 20%, at the same time I re-applied for the tinnitus and a hearing loss. Once again they gave me zip, zero, nada, even though I was told I had an 18% hearing loss.

I now understand that there IS compensation for tinnitus, and there has been for a long time.

I am reapplying through the Legion and I was told that since I have proof that I had made the claim back in the 70's, and it was blown off, I may be eligible for retroactive compensation back till then, is this true??

I know the original claim from the 70's is in my file, because I saw it there when I went through my application and testing three years ago.

Charlie Ford

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Chazman:

Welcome to Hadit and thank you for your Service. There is compensation for tinnitus the ringing in your ear but I would bet that you also have suffered hearing loss. I think that you have a plan and you should proceed with your claim.

Do you use a hearing aid or need one?

Good Luck

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I was a USMC Combat Engineer (tunnel rat) in Viet Nam and had both of my eardrums blown out while setting off a satchel charge on Operation Orange 1966.

I was medivaced for this to Okinawa for treatment.

I have had constant ringing in both of my ears from this for almost 40 years.

I had tried to make a claim on this back in the early 70's with the VA and they gave me zip, zero, nada.

I put in for another compensation claim for agent orange (Diabetes) about three years ago and was granted that one for 20%, at the same time I re-applied for the tinnitus and a hearing loss. Once again they gave me zip, zero, nada, even though I was told I had an 18% hearing loss.

I now understand that there IS compensation for tinnitus, and there has been for a long time.

I am reapplying through the Legion and I was told that since I have proof that I had made the claim back in the 70's, and it was blown off, I may be eligible for retroactive compensation back till then, is this true??

I know the original claim from the 70's is in my file, because I saw it there when I went through my application and testing three years ago.

Charlie Ford

The chance of you getting back to the 70's are slim and none. What you do is get your service medical file that shows the audio when you enlisted, then get the one when you were discharged, next get the medical file from the VA and whatever they have on hearing tests. You take them to a PRIVATE audiologist and tell him look When I went in my hearing was this. When I was discharged it was this. I go to the VAMC and it is this. Can you give me a hearing test, then compare all four and tell me whether I have hearing loss or not. That should be a conclusive test, and then you ask for a Clear and Unmistakeable Error (CUE) decision and try to see how far they will backdate. Your Service Officer will know about it. Good luck, Richard

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