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Sleep Study


jessie0054

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Ok, My husband had a sleep study done at the Va sleep lab last night.

He was up once for the bathroom and durning the time he was sleeping he awaken 30 times and heart stopped 11 times.[that's what the sleep lab tech said] I didn't know that your heart actually stops i thought it was you stopped breathing!!

I have counted his pulse sometimes at night when he's sleeping and i know that his heart rate has dropped down into the 30's and that's when i would give him a nudge to get him to move, I didn't know the heart stops!! Is this normal in Sleep Apnea??

Anyway she told my husband that she was concerned and had thought about coming in a waking him up to put somekind of machine on him. [ am i thinking it is the c-pac or what ever you call it]

He was fully awake at 4 am, [guess it's his internal alarm clock]They sent him home at that time.

He has to go back and do it again this time using the machine.

Jessie

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He might need some kind of device to make sure his heart rate does not go so low at night that it stops like a cardiac pacemaker. 30 beats a minute is not normal in any sense of the word. Maybe a cadiologist would be the first call I would make. What about his blood pressure? Can you go outside the VA to a cardiologist with these medical statistics and get some better explanation? Sleep apnea stops the breathing, but not the heart I think although it can eventually and permanently.

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Hi Jesse,

Please realize that a heart rate in the 30s is VERY serious, he can flatline at that rate! He needs cardiac follow up ASAP. Insist. And refresh yourself in CPR techniques.

Check the sleep study results for his oxygen level and heart rate, both should show on the printout. The VA oxygen guide I found online supports oxygen therapy if the oxygen level drops to 88%. If he also has a service-connected lung condition, the need and use of home oxygen meets one of the criteria for 100% rating.

Sleep apnea can become a very serious medical condition, so be sure to follow up on his next appointment if the VA fails to do so. VA says most veterans are getting appointments within 30 days, but the recent IG reports says VA is lying, rigging the data, so it's up to us to keep a watchful eye and speak up.

I wish you the best in caring for your husband, he is blessed to have you.

Please thank him for his service.

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A heart rate under 60 BPM is considered bradycardia and subnormal as indicated in the previous messages. Mine went to 20 bpm in 1997 and I had to have a cardiac pacemaker implanted.

I have sleep apena as does your husband apparently. A CPAC should allow him to sleep without interruption.

Your husband should see a cardiologist immediately.

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He might need some kind of device to make sure his heart rate does not go so low at night that it stops like a cardiac pacemaker. 30 beats a minute is not normal in any sense of the word. Maybe a cadiologist would be the first call I would make. What about his blood pressure? Can you go outside the VA to a cardiologist with these medical statistics and get some better explanation? Sleep apnea stops the breathing, but not the heart I think although it can eventually and permanently.

Hello John999

Thank you!! I'm not sure why they are not doing anything about his slow heart rate. He is on medication for this. Both the VA and his outside Cardiologist are aware of this.

He has had 2 heart attacks in 3 years and has 2 stents in place. His Blood presure is controlled with several different medications at this point. Sometimes i think it's too low. [ like 166/56] He takes his blood pressure every day and records it and takes it back to his Cariologist at his appointments. They finally told him he didn't need to bring the readings anymore!!

About 3-4 months ago we were back in the ER for what he thought was another heart attack and at that time he kept sounding off the monitor because his pulse rate was dropping. This was many times. Yet they just came in and reset the alarm and went back to what they were doing.

I guess at the time he was the least of their worries since they did have a full blown heart attack on one side of us and an elderly man in resp failure on the other side. They eventually came in and just turned off his alarm so that it didn't keep going off.

He wasn't having a heart attack so he was put on the back burner. When they did get back to him they sent him for another stress test which showed the second blockage resulting in the second stent. I mentioned to the nurse that day about his pulse rate dropping into the 40's 30's and i felt like i was being blown off and it was nothing new and the problem was being worked on.

Since then i check him myself at night [ yea, i've lost a lot of sleep] and yes i am certified in CPR and i have the Emergency numbers programmed into my phone at the bedside just incase i should need them.

I am surprized that if his heart did stop during the sleep study that he wasn't admitted right then into the Cardiac unit!!

I don't know how long it takes the DR to read the results of the study. But if his heart did stop and he's not confused between the heart stopping and the breathing stopping that we should be hearing something very soon!! If i don't hear tomorrow [Monday] I am going to call.

Jessie

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Morgan Please read my reply to John999.

Check the sleep study results for his oxygen level and heart rate, both should show on the printout. The VA oxygen guide I found online supports oxygen therapy if the oxygen level drops to 88%. If he also has a service-connected lung condition, the need and use of home oxygen meets one of the criteria for 100% rating.

How long before we get these reults?? He hasn't been diagnosed with a lung condition at this point, Although i have noticed wheezing from time to time and joking call him wheezer and tell him to cough. Proably due to his smoking. He is trying to quit but it has been a struggle for him.

Sleep apnea can become a very serious medical condition, so be sure to follow up on his next appointment if the VA fails to do so. VA says most veterans are getting appointments within 30 days, but the recent IG reports says VA is lying, rigging the data, so it's up to us to keep a watchful eye and speak up.

I wish you the best in caring for your husband, he is blessed to have you.

Please thank him for his service.

Thanks!! I will tell him!!

Jessie

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A heart rate under 60 BPM is considered bradycardia and subnormal as indicated in the previous messages. Mine went to 20 bpm in 1997 and I had to have a cardiac pacemaker implanted.

I have sleep apena as does your husband apparently. A CPAC should allow him to sleep without interruption.

Your husband should see a cardiologist immediately.

Monitou:

Thank you for your Comments. My Husband does have an outside the VA Cardiogist and one at the VA. I will follow up.

Thanks You

Jessie

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I should have made this part of an earlier comment. I was told that I stopped breathing many times during the two sleep studies I had. I was never told that my heart stopped--this is somewhat odd, but I think there is a difference between "stopped breathing" and "heart stopped."

Of course heart stopped is the eventual result if one doesn't resume breathing. :huh:

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