Jump to content
Ads Keep HadIt.com Online. Consider Turning Off Ad Blockers to Keep HadIt.com Online! ×
  • 0

Oil Fires, Dsm-iv,


yelloownumber5

Question

Hello everyone,

I'm not sure if this site has been posted but anyone that was in the PGW can get a print out of their locations and what the army says odds of any toxins and what not with oil fires....just go to

https://usachppm.apgea.army.mil/gwf/entry.asp

I had a interview with the VA Neuropsyc

he wrote "Thus, he meets criteria for cognitive disorder not otherwise specified (DSM-IV)." Is this considered a diagnosis? This was during the CCEP PGW Registry. If this is a diag do I claim it from the PGW or just as a claim?

My Vetern Service Officer did not want to help me on this.

Second question. I had the VA's PGW Registry phyical and all he did was take my paperwork that they sent me to fill out. He did explain about the mess with Agent Orange and said the VA is working on stuff. He as well did review my blood test, chest xray and urine. I was never given a "physical" or even looked at physically or asked about any conditions that I may have concerns with or anything that I may think had happened from the PGW. I do have a VA doctor and he did say address any issues with them and that is obvious but I thought this (VA Registry) was a way of connecting these conditions.....One of the scary things is I have had two miscarriages with different women and I do know that is another of the PGW "symptoms/effects" which were one of the questions on the form I filled out

I did complete the CCEP (DOD PGW Registry) while on active duty and they were staight forward and asked for our complaints.....that is how I was set up with the Neuropysch, neurologist and all others.

Thanks in advance and have a wonderful week!

Y#5

Edited by yelloownumber5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Answers 22
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters For This Question

Recommended Posts

This claim might help you- the claim does not state if the veteran was claiming under the Persian Gulf regs but he receives 30% for cognitive disorder.

http://www.va.gov/vetapp04/files/0406275.txt

Did the Neuro doctor directly associate this to your service as the etiology? Did he make a clear "more than likely or as likely as not" statement?

This BVA decision states the gamut of ratings for cognitive disorders.

http://www.va.gov/vetapp03/files/0307261.txt

I suggest you read the entire regs regarding Persian Gulf vets in 38 USC 1117 (38 CFR 3.317)

to see if you fall into any criteria in those regs as to "qualifying chronic disabilities" but also

certainly pursue a claim for direct service connection

also -in addition to 38 CFR 3.317- regarding "undiagnosed" illnesses.

In an effort to help Persian Gulf veterans with claims of disabilities that were 'undiagnosable'-Congress passed 38 USC 1117 which in my opinion made things even more difficult for Persian Gulf veterans-in some ways.

If a PGW vet hinges solely on the Persian Gulf regs for Chronic qualifying disability" they could overlook pursuing the claim on a direct service connected basis in a different way.

If VA denies a PGW vet saying they do not have a "chronic qualifying disability " as defined in 38 CFR 3.317-

and the vet has not raised the issue of direct service connection due to documentation in their SMRs for direct service connection- the vet has overlooked one avenue of SC to pursue another when they could use both.

In Gutierrez the CAVC held that Section 1117 eliminated the need for a service nexus.

But claims that can provide service nexus in addition to raising the presumptive regs for PGW vets- have two bases on which to succeed.

If the Neuro in any way associated this cognitive problem to your service this establishes a valid SC claim under direct SC regs yet I cannot determine if this would fall into the 1117 regs at all.

If you have any service nexus for this whatsoever that will override the 1117 regs.

Did you ever had any head trauma in your service, or any documented severe infection or cold or anything whatsoever that could be the nexus for the cognitive disorder?

Did the Neuro give any etiology or cause for it?

Edited by Berta
Link to comment
Share on other sites

PS- I did a little more research and found "oil fires" were mentioned -as you did in this topic as cause of disability in many PGW veterans.

Many however could not prove a direct linkage to their exposure to the smoke even though they had significant lung problems.

This veteran did.She proved her unit was exposed to the oil fire smoke many times and her SMRs revealed that she had sought treatment many times for for allergic rhinitis/sinusitis.

The BVA awarded her claim.http://www.va.gov/vetapp00/files1/0008428.txt

If you were exposed to the oil fires and smoke and have any disability that you can prove is due to that-that too is a way to attain service connection.

These claims usually need -as well as very strong nexus to SMRs - solid medical prove that the disability is a direct result of the smoke exposure from the oil fires of Desert Storm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Berta,

The eitology was "Circumscribed deficits in verbal memory and visuoconstruction remains unclear; there are no clear antecedents or risk factors to which they can be easily attributed. The findings also do not appear attributable to motivational factors. Such deficits have at times been reported in Gulf War veterans, and even though (the member) does not appear to have been exposed to a high number of potential neurotoxins, this hypothesis remains viable. The presense of other apparently neurological symptoms, such as the numbness reported by (the member), has also been reported in some samples of Gulf War veterans"

My VA voc rehab Counselor was concerned about this and me going on with school, I did suck on their Visuo spatial test as well. Kind of funny that the voc rehab brought all this to my attention, I never received this report from the VA, after she said this I went to get this copy.

With the allergic rhinitis/sinusitis. "You were seen multiple times for sinus infections while you were on active duty, primarily as a result of the allergic rhinitis. A CT Scan conducted in November 2002 did not show Chronic sinusitis was the cause of the sinus infections. The main cause was the deviated septum" "disability has not been clinically diagnosed as sinusitis" So, when I went to claim for a deviated septum, I was told there was "no record of trama" which is what they said I need for a deviated septum. I did have septoplasty surgery to try and correct my deviated septum.

I did get a rating but at the big zero sc percent for Allergic Rhinitis.

I guess I need to get the sinusitis diagnosed, I did ask the ENT last time I seen him but I'm not sure if that will matter since I retired almost 4 years ago now.

Berta, also you said for the Cognitive claim you sent me, it did not say if the member filed under PGW regs or not.....I don't know what difference it would make for me but I was going to try to claim with the PGW but not sure of what advantages/disadvantages.

Thanks much for your knowledge.

Y#5

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also.........

How can the VA say this.

I enter the service and not have a deviated septum (not annotated on my physical and medical records) and then some how while on active duty I have a deviated septum but not being able to service connect it?

I did have a record of some minor face trauma but both examples I submitted they said would not have caused this. My only other trauma was a car accident which I was on duty driving from Pensacola, FL to Hurlburt Field, FL......which is where it probably came from but I do not have anything in my record stating any trauma just blood tests and something else. The cause of the accident was I fell asleep while driving.

Thanks again,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"The cause of the accident was I fell asleep while driving."

Could you support -with medical evidence-a claim of chronic fatigue syndrome?

This is a PGW presumptive condition as explained in the 38 CFR 3.317 regs.

There are many chronic fatigue syndrome claims at the BVA.

This vet succeeded in higher rating for CFS but I cant determine if the original award was PGW presumptive or not-

http://www.va.gov/vetapp98/files1/9801156.txt

Still the evidence of CFS in service or diagnosed now and claimed under 38 CFR 3.317 could produce service connection if the medical evidence warrants this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Berta,

I do have Sleep Apnea but I have not filed a claim for this yet. I am looking to get some statements from friends and shipmates. I do have in my record about day time fatigue often but never was diagnosed until 31 Oct 2006 and retired 31 Dec 2003. While on active duty and doing the CCEP Persian Gulf War physical this was one of my complaints but I never was sent to see anyone along those lines. I do get confused......Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is one of those undiag that have been related to PGW as presumptive for PGW but after I retired Sleep Apnea I was diagnosed so that cancels out the claim for PGW. correct?

But would not the cognitive/memory issues qualify me to make a claim as undiag for the pgw or is this not good enough........The eitology was "Circumscribed deficits in verbal memory and visuoconstruction remains unclear; there are no clear antecedents or risk factors to which they can be easily attributed. The findings also do not appear attributable to motivational factors. Such deficits have at times been reported in Gulf War veterans, and even though (the member) does not appear to have been exposed to a high number of potential neurotoxins, this hypothesis remains viable. The presense of other apparently neurological symptoms, such as the numbness reported by (the member), has also been reported in some samples of Gulf War veterans"

I just get told no no and no by the vso on everything but my vocational rehab counselor was extremely concerned from the neurophsyc remarks and thought I should file a claim for it...

Thanks again,

.

"The cause of the accident was I fell asleep while driving."

Could you support -with medical evidence-a claim of chronic fatigue syndrome?

This is a PGW presumptive condition as explained in the 38 CFR 3.317 regs.

There are many chronic fatigue syndrome claims at the BVA.

This vet succeeded in higher rating for CFS but I cant determine if the original award was PGW presumptive or not-

http://www.va.gov/vetapp98/files1/9801156.txt

Still the evidence of CFS in service or diagnosed now and claimed under 38 CFR 3.317 could produce service connection if the medical evidence warrants this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would file for CFS as well as sleep apnea-

I suggest you read over the Persian Gulf Vet regs very carefully-38 USc 1117

and also read PGW claims at the BVA.

The Persian Gulf regs provide a way a PGW vet can gain service connection in addition to direct service connection.In other words-say a PGW vet has insercvice nexus that supports PTSD claim.But the vet also from physical symptoms that are found in the regs as a "multisymptom illess" that is undiagnosed or chronic.

The veteran can also file a claim for this disorder requesting service connection under 38 USC 1117 for the multisymptom illness as well as service connection for the PTSD under the regular SC regs.

The medical statement you posted-

But would not the cognitive/memory issues qualify me to make a claim as undiag for the pgw or is this not good enough........The eitology was "Circumscribed deficits in verbal memory and visuoconstruction remains unclear; there are no clear antecedents or risk factors to which they can be easily attributed. The findings also do not appear attributable to motivational factors. Such deficits have at times been reported in Gulf War veterans, and even though (the member) does not appear to have been exposed to a high number of potential neurotoxins, this hypothesis remains viable. The presense of other apparently neurological symptoms, such as the numbness reported by (the member), has also been reported in some samples of Gulf War veterans"

Was this from your private doctor or a VA doctor?

Did the VA opine on this statement in any denial?

When you say VSO- do you mean your vet rep or a VSO who works for the VA?

If you are obtaining an independent medical opinion -please read my post called "Getting an Independent Medical Opinion" under the search feature.

If I were you I would raise the sleep apnea issue for direct SC as well as pursue CFS under the PGW regs.

An IMO doctor would need to have-in addition to all of your medical records- the criteria I posted for an IMO and then the Regs for direct SC as well as PGW prersumtive illnesses.

The sleep apnea- as I understand your post, could be possibly directly attributed to your service by an inservice nexus- Therefore it could mean the CFS claim might not be found as a "qualifying chronic disability" or vice versa-

but one of the claims could succeed.It doesn't matter which one.And you can always challenge the rating if they award.

38 USC 1117 , the court has declared, can rest on buddy statements as competent objective evidence of your symptoms.

Dont overlook all the Gulf war sites that could have a "Looking for" section as well as Military.com and even your own unit might have a members site where you can find buddies.

I commend you for actively trying to obtain these buddy statements, because of the Gutierrez case, the court finds them as competent eye witness accounts of symptomology for PGW veterans.

Edited by Berta
Link to comment
Share on other sites

y#5,

Oil fires and nerve gas agents are two things we old RVN vets didn't really need to worry about, unlike newer vets and especialy Gulf War vets.

[EDIT: Oops...forgot about Dioxin...AKA: Agent Orange. But I think you guys had more serious chemicals used over there...I mean, I don't recall the VC or NVA using nerve gas on anyone or having such weapons to use. Besides, AO was "friendly fire" and not from the enemy!]

You also should be keeping up with forums such as this one:

http://www.gulfwarvets.com/ubb/ultimatebb....ic;f=4;t=000473

Berta has pointed out the necessity of having a strong nexus whereas this website's thread (above) talks more about symptoms.

Good luck,

-- John D.

Edited by cloudcroft
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Berta and Cloud,

Berta that statement on my cognitive status came from from the VA Neurophysc which I have the notes.....That was a quote and I guess how and why I get confused is I gave that paperwork to my county rep that files the claim for me (I know he isn't the final word but he can make it hard getting claims in) and he said "you don't have a case to claim this". I was also going to request the notes from my vocational Rehab counselor as she was concerned she also pointed out my twitching which for me became "normal".... I am getting statements for the sleep apnea from friends because again even though it is in my record my non va rep that files my paperwork said in both cases for the Sleep Apnea and Memory Issues "you do not have grounds for the claim". I took him the VA Neurophysc notes and let him read......now with the Sleep Apnea I did not have statements but I told him and showed him paperwork I had that repeatedly in my medical record talked about "day time fatigue" with 8-9 hours sleep. My current wife was in nursing and she said I stop breathing in my sleep.....and that is how I got it rolling with my primary care physican, however, that was not diag until almost 3 years after I retired but those statement will roll in. Won't the VA say that since I have sleep apnea that is a diag and no CFS? Honestly I have this CPAP and stil tired, however, and I been fighting for my thyroid to be looked at for over 7 years in which they finally say there is a nodule but I have not seen any specialist yet but of course I retired in late 2003. Should I file for the sleep apnea first or it does not matter?

Also due to my GERD/Hiatal Hernia I have now been diag with Barretts Esophgus, this is from the GERD, so do I just do a claim for secondary and what do I ask for.....my VSO Rep always handeled this......and I know if you don't ask for something the VA does not give it to you so I want to make sure I am asking for what I should ask for. Non of these have been claimed under the PGW but just regular claims. TY for ya guidance.

Is there any connection of Thyroid problems and PGW? I was reading the BVA claims last night.....I was getting tired but seen a few ideas.

I will look up those regs again.....my mind just does not function the best and I get confused, your words are my actions. Thanks.

Cloud,

Now, if I have these problems below I marked "yes" to but also diag with acid reflux (which is one below), won't they say the gas, naseua, and all that is related to acid reflux? My acid reflux s.c. was not claimed from the pgw but it should have been connected to that but I do not know how to do such......tks

Thanks for that website.....it gets confustion because I have looked for PGW symptoms, presumptive conditions and find different information and I'm not sure of what is the latest. I'm starting to think I need to say to hell with my county VSO and get in communications with someone with DAV or something that would be more helpful. By the way, when I just had my VA PGW Registry I put on the sheet that I did take the pyridostigmine bromide and also I had two miscarriages with different women ironically both age 27 but he did not say anything nor did he even look at this part of the answers.......am I supposed to know that now I went thru this "va pgw registry" I can file a claim for such or?

stomach cramps YES

gas YES YES YES

diarrhea YES

nausea YES

increased urge to urinate YES

drooling YES only on the left side of my mouth

sweating ?

headaches YES

dizziness YES

eye tearing YES

blurred vision YES YES YES

runny nose Yes but also stuffy which is more annoying

shortness of breath YES

acid stomach, including heartburn or reflux YES GERD that has developed into Barretts Esphogus

tingling of fingers, toes, arms, and legs YES but also Cervical and Lumbar supported DDD but it isn't all from DDD because my limbs will go numb without the rest going numb

muscle twitching, weakness, or cramping YES same as above

But like when I filed a claim for CTS which I have had sports medicine to an EMG which is bilateral positive and they did another test, well it was service connected granted at zero percent but they said most of my symptoms were due to my cervical damage.....

Yes, confusion for me. I understand the C&P is only a physical of those parts at that time but if you have other issues they might send either mixed signals or over shadow what you are there for.......wouldn't it make sense for the examiner to know your current ratings and problems so they can try a little bit harder to seperate this from that (i.e. I have cervical issues that when he does this test and that and he asks what do I feel I may feel only my cervical problems because that is worse than this other test).

Thanks very much......I'm just fustrated with my "representative" and getting confused with different thing I read.

Love ya for all the assistance and patience with me.

I would file for CFS as well as sleep apnea-

I suggest you read over the Persian Gulf Vet regs very carefully-38 USc 1117

and also read PGW claims at the BVA.

The Persian Gulf regs provide a way a PGW vet can gain service connection in addition to direct service connection.In other words-say a PGW vet has insercvice nexus that supports PTSD claim.But the vet also from physical symptoms that are found in the regs as a "multisymptom illess" that is undiagnosed or chronic.

The veteran can also file a claim for this disorder requesting service connection under 38 USC 1117 for the multisymptom illness as well as service connection for the PTSD under the regular SC regs.

The medical statement you posted-

But would not the cognitive/memory issues qualify me to make a claim as undiag for the pgw or is this not good enough........The eitology was "Circumscribed deficits in verbal memory and visuoconstruction remains unclear; there are no clear antecedents or risk factors to which they can be easily attributed. The findings also do not appear attributable to motivational factors. Such deficits have at times been reported in Gulf War veterans, and even though (the member) does not appear to have been exposed to a high number of potential neurotoxins, this hypothesis remains viable. The presense of other apparently neurological symptoms, such as the numbness reported by (the member), has also been reported in some samples of Gulf War veterans"

Was this from your private doctor or a VA doctor?

Did the VA opine on this statement in any denial?

When you say VSO- do you mean your vet rep or a VSO who works for the VA?

If you are obtaining an independent medical opinion -please read my post called "Getting an Independent Medical Opinion" under the search feature.

If I were you I would raise the sleep apnea issue for direct SC as well as pursue CFS under the PGW regs.

An IMO doctor would need to have-in addition to all of your medical records- the criteria I posted for an IMO and then the Regs for direct SC as well as PGW prersumtive illnesses.

The sleep apnea- as I understand your post, could be possibly directly attributed to your service by an inservice nexus- Therefore it could mean the CFS claim might not be found as a "qualifying chronic disability" or vice versa-

but one of the claims could succeed.It doesn't matter which one.And you can always challenge the rating if they award.

38 USC 1117 , the court has declared, can rest on buddy statements as competent objective evidence of your symptoms.

Dont overlook all the Gulf war sites that could have a "Looking for" section as well as Military.com and even your own unit might have a members site where you can find buddies.

I commend you for actively trying to obtain these buddy statements, because of the Gutierrez case, the court finds them as competent eye witness accounts of symptomology for PGW veterans.

Edited by yelloownumber5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Won't the VA say that since I have sleep apnea that is a diag and no CFS"

With sleep problems documented- as I understood your post- in your SMRs-and along with buddy statements- and certainly the wife ,as a professional,who also can send the VA a statement to support what you told us-

I saw the sleep apnea as a potential way to get service connection if the CFS claim is denied.

A veteran or widow can raise any potential way to have their disabilit service connected.

I raised 2 issue in 1995 with VA as to my husband's death-

1.direct service connection of death -for SC PTSD contributing to heart.

2. death By VA.

I proved # 2- that VA caused his death.They denied the PTSD to heart claim.

The DIC comp was the same amount either way.

I have raised 3 issues in the last 4 years for direct SC death-

1. PTSD contributing to death under Section 1151.

2. Agent Orange diabetes as one of numerous misdiagnoses , causing the veterans death.

3. PTSD directly contributing to fatal heart disease

# 2 has 3 IMOs to support and is the strongest case.

The VA, by way of recent correspondence, wants to re-open the PTSD as contributing to Rod's fatal heart disease- this is the claim I filed originally in 1995 or 1996.

I also had re-opened the Sec 1151 PTSD contributing to death claim.

This component of the veterans original Sec 1151 claim which I re-opened after his death was never addressed either by the RO or Gen. COunsel when I filed FTCA death claim.

I have VA correspondence that I offered as evidence from the RO VSM herself-that says the PTSD WAS a component of my Section 1151 award.

If so- if a SC disability (PTSD) is part of a Section 1151 award that stated "multiple" medical errors occured yet did not state what they actually were-

my claim then asks where is the direct SC death award for PTSD contributing to death?

3 ways to go-

For a Direct SC death.

My long point here is-in my opinion- a vet should use any presumptive potentials as well as direct SC approach whatsoever to any claim whenever they can.

One more point-the DAV tried to tell me in 1995 I had no basis for my 2 claims. I won them both.

Some vet rep at the 800# , when I called for status years ago- told me, since I get DIC I have no basis for my AO death claim.

She was wrong.I didnt get angry.I filed a complaint on her.

I have 7 issues before the VA and proper decisions on 3 of them will render my other claims moot.

They could have awarded my AO death claim-my main issue, in 2005 but ignored my evidence.

I believe the wording of my recent response to their letter will get them straightened out.

I am making a long point here but a veteran should raise ANY potential reason for service connection whatsoever by direct or presumptive regs.

Edited by Berta
Link to comment
Share on other sites

y#5,

[DISCLAIMER: I have no medical background so I can't say what doctors may or not say. Sorry...I tried, but wasn't smart enough to go to medical school]

Well, the main thing you should be concerned with right now is not what anyone of us say here but what a VA doctor's (probably the C&P examiner...hopefully a doctor but might be a NP or PA instead) opinion is, I mean getting him/her to render a medical opinion that "as likely as not" (those magic words) your symptoms are caused by your GW service. Due to the lack of conclusive medical evidence re: "GW Syndrome," the opinion "as likely as not" may be the best you will get. If you do, consider yourself fortunate.

The doctor will, of course, have to give his/her rationale for that statement...hopefully, said doctor will be up on current medical-community opinion re: GW issues and can cite appropriate medical studies on GW ailments to support his/her words "as likely as not." Maybe all you can hope for is the balance tipping slightly in your favor, or at least relative equipoise.

[EDIT: Correction...For the record here, the correct phrase is "more likely than not" which would indicate the doctor thinks the evidence tips in the veterans favor even if only a little bit, i.e., greater than 50%. "As likely as not" would suggest a balance, 50-50, which technically-speaking still would be good since this may allow the Benefit of Doubt doctrine to be applied IF all the other evidence is also balanced. Although I found the phrase "as likely as not" used here (http://www.ejnet.org/rachel/rhwn212.htm), which seems to justify its use as I originally meant it, in the paragraph where it says:

"The conclusion that these illnesses are "at least as likely as not" to occur from Agent Orange exposure is important within the VA because the VA's rules for compensation require a finding that a disease is "as likely as not" to occur from a chemical exposure before that disease becomes compensable."

...I believe the usual phrase is "more likely than not" as it is found used much more often in VA cases and indicates a more than 50% chance in favor of the veteran rather than a 50-50 balance. It's still an educated guess though. Sorry for the confusion.]

Sometimes, especially when a disability is still in controversy -- as these "undiagnosed" GW issues are -- it comes down to an EDUCATED GUESS because doctors just don't know for sure.

As for some of your symptoms being related to GERD, some may be but others may not be: I have GERD myself and experience no nausea for example. And some ailments have similar/shared symptoms. So don't do the VA's work associating these symptoms to GERD instead of to GW service and deny your own claim -- the VA doesn't need your help in denying you but they will certainly appreciate your efforts and most likely will cite your comments as evidence against you in their denial letter -- do your research on BVA and CVA cases re: GW vets with these issues and see what the BVA/CVA say about them, and even though this "undiagnosed" GW medical issue is still controversial and the DOD /VA won't admit to anything about it except deny...until it has conclusive medical evidence to the contrary...which seems only fair if the VA is honest about also being fair to veterans.

Even if the BVA/CVA ruled against the vet (such as this case for example that I happened across accidentally: http://www.va.gov/vetapp03/Files/0314800.txt where the vet lost SC but there's STILL information in there re: these issues). Cases where a vet wins are the best of course, but you can learn much how the BVA/CVA reasons even if vets lose because the BVA/CVA will cite/analyze medical evidence and determine if it applies or not; you can judge your claim against these.

[DISCLAIMER: I am not nor have I ever been a VSO so this also is just IMO]

What VSO to go with? I don't know. I had a state VSO -- Texas Veterans Commission (TVC) -- they were next to useless. I had to go it on my own, mainly because once I had chosen a VSO, other VSOs would not accept my case because I had not gone with them right up front. How was I supposed to know all that when I started and being ignorant of the process, what VSOs were good, bad, indifferent, etc.? Go see a few VSOs in your local area...see if you like how they come across, if they seem competent or not, or even care about vets or not. Then choose the one you feel best about. Even the so-called "good" VSOs have some lazy jerks working for them sometimes...you can't really be sure, so just go on your gut feeling re: their competence and concern for you...or lack thereof. Even if they prove to be useless later on, you can dump them and go on your own...but likely no other vetorg will take you because you started with someone else.

As for your "GW Registry," I don't know what it is all about. Many years ago, I did the AO Registry myself which may be different nowadays. It was just a physical looking for then-known AO caused ailments (and I suppose more statistics for their AO database). None were found at that time. That's the last I have heard of it. The "registry" did nothing else for me and maybe it wasn't supposed to. I suspect your GW Registry is the same so don't expect much from it and you won't be disappointed.

Okay, so you have all these symptoms, still, you need a doctor to verify you HAVE said symptoms, their degree of severity, then to render a medical opinion such as they are "as likely as not" [EDIT: "More likely than not"] SCed. Especially the cervical issue. But you have to face the possibility this will not happen and you won't be able to get any doctor to state that the cervical issue, especially, is more GW related than to any previous injury. That may be a real tough one.

[but hopefully, you won't be like the guy who's wife had to provide pictures of her husband over in the Sand Box to prove he was actually there because his military records did not! Incredible! But that's another topic...]

So do you really think you have a good case or not? If so, go for it, if not, forget it...or wait until you DO have a good case...which may mean finding more persuasive medical evidence.

Basically, it's that simple...and true for the rest of us whether we are GW vets or not.

From your posts I think you tend to over-intellectualize over this, I mean you over-analyze everything to the point of almost inaction. Sure, it's good to speculate "what if the VA does this" or "what if the VA does that" -- as I have said earlier, you DO need to have Plan B, Plan C, etc., for whatever they VA does at any given stage of the process so you can react appropriately and continue your claim without delay -- but you can also "ruminate" yourself into inaction and contribute to your own confusion and complicate your own case. So take things simply, partly by taking them in simple steps.

File a claim for SC for all those symptoms as part of the GW illness or whatever it's called. When you see the C&P examining doctor, and since we don't know exactly what will take place -- exams done/questions asked -- just play it by ear. What you think the doctor needs to know/consider tell him/her.

[You must have been through this before since you already have a 50% rating so you know the ropes so I just restate them here]

Afterwards, get a copy of the C&P and note any mistakes and such. Wait for a decision from VARO because you really can't do anything until then...unless you want to ask for another C&P ASAP if the first one is really off-the-wall. But you can't file a NOD until after you get a decision and SOC.

While waiting for the decision from VARO, plan what you will do about any errors or misrepresentations you saw in the C&P -- or, how to rebut the C&P if it seems to be against you -- should you get a denial from VARO. If VARO grants your claim, game over (usually). If not, file an NOD, addressing the reasons why you were denied.

Basically, it's the same we ALL have to do, just our individual disabilities and what it takes to prove/SC them are different.

Good luck,

-- John D.

Edited by cloudcroft
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

>PS- I did a little more research and found "oil fires" were mentioned -as you did in this topic as cause of disability in many PGW veterans.

Many however could not prove a direct linkage to their exposure to the smoke even though they had significant lung problems.

This veteran did.She proved her unit was exposed to the oil fire smoke many times and her SMRs revealed that she had sought treatment many times for for allergic rhinitis/sinusitis.

1)crude oil fires

2)allergic rhinitis/sinusitis

3)significant lung problems

4)neuromuscular disorders

= exposures to high levels of VANADIUM in crude oil?

= Dioxins?

= DU?

or all the above.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

Health effects of vanadium (data sheet)

http://www.lenntech.com/Periodic-chart-elements/V-en.htm

The uptake of vanadium by humans mainly takes place through foodstuffs, such as buckwheat, soya beans, olive oil, sunflower oil, apples and eggs.

Vanadium can have a number of effects on human health, when the uptake is too high. When vanadium uptake takes places through air it can cause bronchitis and pneumonia.

The acute effects of vanadium are irritation of lungs, throat, eyes and nasal cavities.

Other health effects of vanadium uptake are:

- Cardiac and vascular disease

- Inflammation of stomach and intestines

- Damage to the nervous system

- Bleeding of livers and kidneys

- Skin rashes

- Severe trembling and paralyses

- Nose bleeds and throat pains

- Weakening

- Sickness and headaches

- Dizziness

- Behavioural changes

The health hazards associated with exposure to vanadium are dependent on its oxidation state. This product contains elemental vanadium. Elemental vanadium could be oxidized to vanadium pentoxide during welding. The pentoxide form is more toxic than the elemental form. Chronic exposure to vanadium pentoxide dust and fumes may cause severe irritation of the eyes, skin, upper respiratory tract, persistent inflammations of the trachea and bronchi, pulmonary edema, and systemic poisoning. Signs and symptoms of overexposure include; conjunctivitis, nasopharyngitis, cough, labored breathing, rapid heart beat, lung changes, chronic bronchitis, skin pallor, greenish-black tongue and an allergic skin rash.

Effects of vanadium on the environment

Vanadium can be found in the environment in algae, plants, invertebrates, fishes and many other species. In mussels and crabs vanadium strongly bioaccumulates, which can lead to concentrations of about 105 to 106 times greater than the concentrations that are found in seawater.

Vanadium causes the inhibition of certain enzymes with animals, which has several neurological effects. Next to the neurological effects vanadium can cause breathing disorders, paralyses and negative effects on the liver and kidneys.

Laboratory tests with test animals have shown, that vanadium can cause harm to the reproductive system of male animals, and that it accumulates in the female placenta.

Vanadium can cause DNA alteration in some cases, but it cannot cause cancer with animals.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

Acute, subchronic, or chronic exposures to particulate matter (PM) and pollutant gases affect people in urban areas and [b]those exposed to fires, disasters, and wars.

Search Terms: Vanadium AND Brain http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed

1: Neurochem Res. 2004 Jul;29(7):1365-9.

Nigrostriatal modifications after vanadium inhalation: an immunocytochemical and cytological approach.

National University of Mexico, Mexico City.

Vanadium (V) has increased in the air as a component of suspended particles originated from fuel combustion. In this report, a model of inhaled V in mice was implemented to identify the effect that V has in the corpus striatum and substantia nigra, structures with high concentrations of dopamine and scarce antioxidants burden. Mice inhaled 0.02 M V2O5 1 h twice a week and were sacrificed at points from 1 to 8 weeks after inhalation, perfused, and processed for Golgi method and for tyroxine hidroxylase (TH) inmunocytochemistry. Cytological analysis consisted in counting the number of dendritic spines in 20 medium-size spiny neurons and the number of TH immunoreactive neurons in the substatia nigra pars compacta. Dendritic spine density decreased drastically after V exposure; the same was observed with the TH-positive neurons, which decreased in a time-dependent mode. No previous morphological studies about V and nervous system have been reported. The decrease in spine density and in TH-positive neurons might have functional repercussions that should be studied because the trend of this element in the atmosphere is to increase.

PMID: 15202766 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Search Terms: vanadium AND brain http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=PubMed

1: Toxicol Pathol. 2003 Sep-Oct;31(5):524-38.

DNA damage in nasal and brain tissues of canines exposed to air pollutants is associated with evidence of chronic brain inflammation and neurodegeneration.

Environmental Pathology Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7310, USA. liliancalderon888@hotmail.com

Acute, subchronic, or chronic exposures to particulate matter (PM) and pollutant gases affect people in urban areas and those exposed to fires, disasters, and wars.

Respiratory tract inflammation, production of mediators of inflammation capable of reaching the brain, systemic circulation of PM, and disruption of the nasal respiratory and olfactory barriers are likely in these populations. DNA damage is crucial in aging and in age-associated diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

We evaluated ... healthy dogs naturally exposed to urban pollution in Mexico City.

Nickel (Ni) and vanadium (V) were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

Forty mongrel dogs, ages 7 days-10 years were studied (14 controls from Tlaxcala and 26 exposed to urban pollution in South West Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC)).

Nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium were found to be early pollutant targets.

Olfactory bulb and hippocampal AP sites were significantly higher in exposed than in control age matched animals. Ni and V[anadium] were present in a gradient from olfactory mucosa > olfactory bulb > frontal cortex.

Exposed dogs had (a) nuclear neuronal NFkappaB p65, (B) endothelial, glial and neuronal iNOS, © endothelial and glial COX2, (d) ApoE in neuronal, glial and vascular cells, and (e) APP and beta amyloid(1-42) in neurons, diffuse plaques (the earliest at age 11 months), and in subarachnoid blood vessels.

Increased AP sites and the inflammatory and stress protein brain responses were early and significant in dogs exposed to urban pollution.

Oil combustion PM-associated metals Ni and Vanadium were detected in the brain. There was an acceleration of Alzheimer's-type pathology in dogs chronically exposed to air pollutants. Respiratory tract inflammation and deteriorating olfactory and respiratory barriers may play a role in the observed neuropathology. These data suggest that Alzheimer's disease may be the sequela of air pollutant exposures and the resulting systemic inflammation.

PMID: 14692621 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Edited by allan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

Article

Acute respiratory symptoms in workers exposed to vanadium-rich fuel-oil ash

Mark A. Woodin, ScD, MS 1 2, Youcheng Liu, MD, ScD, MPH 1, Donna Neuberg, ScD 3, Russ Hauser, MD, ScD, MPH 1, Thomas J. Smith, PhD, MPH 1, David C. Christiani, MD, MPH 1 2 4 *

1Department of Environmental Health (Occupational Health Program), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115

2Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115

3Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115

4Pulmonary and Critical Care Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114

email: David C. Christiani (dchris@hohp.harvard.edu)

*Correspondence to David C. Christiani, Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115.

Funded by:

NIEHS; Grant Number: ES05947, ES07069, ES00002

NIOSH; Grant Number: OH02421, CCU109979

Keywords

vanadium; PM10; occupational epidemiology; occupational lung disease; boilermakers; industrial hygiene

Abstract

Background

Occupational exposure to fuel-oil ash, with its high vanadium content, may cause respiratory illness. It is unclear, however, what early acute health effects may occur on the pathway from normal to compromised respiratory function.

Methods

Using a repeated measures design, we studied prospectively 18 boilermakers overhauling an oil-fired boiler and 11 utility worker controls. Subjects completed a respiratory symptom diary five times per day by using a 0-3 scale where 0=symptom not present, 1=mild symptom, 2=moderate symptom, and 3=severe symptom. Daily symptom severity was calculated by using the highest reported score each day for upper and lower respiratory symptoms. Daily symptom frequency was calculated by summing all upper or lower airway symptom reports, then dividing by number of reporting times. Respiratory symptom frequency and severity were analyzed for dose-response relationships with estimated vanadium and PM10 doses to the lung and upper airway by using robust regression.

Results

During the overhaul, 72% of boilermakers reported lower airway symptoms, and 67% reported upper airway symptoms. These percentages were 27 and 36 for controls. Boilermakers had more frequent and more severe upper and lower respiratory symptoms compared to utility workers, and this difference was greatest during interior boiler work. A statistically significant dose-response pattern for frequency and severity of both upper and lower respiratory symptoms was seen with vanadium and PM10 in the three lower exposure quartiles. However, there was a reversal in the dose-response trend in the highest exposure quartile, reflecting a possible healthy worker effect.

Conclusions

Boilermakers experience more frequent and more severe respiratory symptoms than utility workers. This is most statistically significant during boiler work and is associated with increasing dose estimates of lung and nasal vanadium and PM10. Am. J. Ind. Med. 37:353-363, 2000. © 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

Even if the AO Registry Exam were to find conditions that are AO related you still have to file a claim. My AO exam discovered DMII and PN. I still had to file a claim and the VA still sent me for a C&P. They did not accept their own AO doctor's diagnosis and nexus statements. They even denied the PN the first time around although the AO exam had stated it was caused most likely by AO and that it was severe and debilitating. The VA agreed it was debilitating but said the etiology was unknown. Went to the DRO and got that fixed but I was still low balled. I guess I have a bad attitude about the VA benefits system since I have had to fight each and every claim for SC and for percentage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

TBI, Multiple Sclerosis, or VANADIUM penetrating the Blood Brain Barrior(BBB) via sinuses, from systemic fungal infection?

#########################################################################

1: Mol Cell Biochem. 1988 Dec;84(2):199-216.

Active oxygen in neuromuscular disorders.

Davison A, Tibbits G, Shi ZG, Moon J.

Faculty of Applied Sciences, School of Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada.

Although muscle and nerve are reasonably well protected against active oxygen and related free radicals, environmental or inherited malfunctions can overpower their defences. Active oxygen is involved in many neuropathies and myopathies. In every case the damage is caused by agents which exert effects disproportionately greater than the quantities encountered, through a variety of amplification mechanisms. We can categorize these amplification mechanisms as follows: (a) non-replacement of targets (e.g. loss of genetic information, ataxia telangectasia being an hereditary ataxia in which an oxygen mediated chromosomal instability is apparent), (B) non-removal of unwanted materials (e.g. lipofuscin accumulation in brain and heart), © redox cycling, usually involving catalysis by trace-metal ions (e.g. some forms of Parkinsonism), (d) non-redox catalysis (e.g. toxicity in cardiac muscle or brain due to vanadium or aluminium respectively), (e) modification of ion transport (e.g. calcium ionophore or acrylamide induce histopathological changes in muscle, similar in some respects to those seen in Duchenne muscular dystrophy), (f) compromised defences (e.g. muscle and nerve become particularly susceptible to free radical damage after loss of the protective actions of vitamin E), and (g) amplification by inflammatory and immune responses (e.g. multiple sclerosis, reperfusion injury to brain and heart, and traumatic injury to nervous tissue). Unfortunately, a variety of therapeutic agents which might be expected to protect against almost every conceivable form of oxygen mediated damage have proved clinically ineffective in most of these disorders. The reasons for this will be explored with an emphasis on common features, differences, mechanisms, and potential therapeutic approaches.

Publication Types:

Review

Review, Tutorial

PMID: 3068522 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...&query_hl=4

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Allen,

Thanks for the information.........one day people will realize that individuals are not numbers and we will be given what is owed to us for our illnesses vs. you have a 1 in XXX of getting this illness.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

Hello yelloownumber5

I would try to get a Dr that specializes in neurotoxicities to provide a statement as to the relationship of exposure and your currant illnesses.

>one day people will realize that individuals are not numbers.

Maybe! Souls are not factored in as part of the bean counters math and I don't see that changing in this life.

We live in a society where torture is acceptable and Veterans don't deserve the rights of terrorists or illegals. I don't see that changing soon either.

I've spent allot of years trying to convince rating specialists, that a spit in the face and a slow, agonizing, lonely death is not compensation under the law.

It hasn't changed anything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Allan,

Thanks. I did look through my record and found a "brain MRI" from 2001 while on active duty and kind of confused with it I wanted to ask a few terms from the findings/impressions, I also did have another one today and will have a follow up with neuro in two weeks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.


  • veterans-crisis-line.jpg
    The Veterans Crisis Line can help even if you’re not enrolled in VA benefits or health care.

    CHAT NOW

  • question-001.jpeg

    Have Questions? Get Answers.

    Tips on posting on the forums.

    1. Post a clear title like ‘Need help preparing PTSD claim’ or “VA med center won’t schedule my surgery instead of ‘I have a question.
       
    2. Knowledgeable people who don’t have time to read all posts may skip yours if your need isn’t clear in the title.
      I don’t read all posts every login and will gravitate towards those I have more info on.
       
    3. Use paragraphs instead of one massive, rambling introduction or story.
       
      Again – You want to make it easy for others to help. If your question is buried in a monster paragraph, there are fewer who will investigate to dig it out.
     
    Leading too:

    exclamation-point.pngPost straightforward questions and then post background information.
     
    Examples:
     
    • Question A. I was previously denied for apnea – Should I refile a claim?
      • Adding Background information in your post will help members understand what information you are looking for so they can assist you in finding it.
    Rephrase the question: I was diagnosed with apnea in service and received a CPAP machine, but the claim was denied in 2008. Should I refile?
     
    • Question B. I may have PTSD- how can I be sure?
      • See how the details below give us a better understanding of what you’re claiming.
    Rephrase the question: I was involved in a traumatic incident on base in 1974 and have had nightmares ever since, but I did not go to mental health while enlisted. How can I get help?
     
    This gives members a starting point to ask clarifying questions like “Can you post the Reasons for Denial of your claim?”
     
    Note:
     
    • Your first posts on the board may be delayed before they appear as they are reviewed. This process does not take long.
    • Your first posts on the board may be delayed before they appear as they are reviewed. The review requirement will usually be removed by the 6th post. However, we reserve the right to keep anyone on moderator preview.
    • This process allows us to remove spam and other junk posts before hitting the board. We want to keep the focus on VA Claims, and this helps us do that.
  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

    tinnitus-005.pngptsd-005.pnglumbosacral-005.pngscars-005.pnglimitation-flexion-knee-005.pngdiabetes-005.pnglimitation-motion-ankle-005.pngparalysis-005.pngdegenerative-arthitis-spine-005.pngtbi-traumatic-brain-injury-005.png

  • VA Watchdog

  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

    employment 2.jpeg

    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

{terms] and Guidelines