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Does Anyone Feel The Way I Do Ptsd?


yoggie2

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Please , understand first of all I really dig this message board and its not my intention to P.O anyone. I found out today why my increase for my injury and is being held up and was told they need my 201 file to see if I had any awards such as a Company log or a Purple Heart or a CIB or " just serve in the Gulf War 2" my thought was how dare the VA take this away from me I paid for it and still paying for it. here is part of the thred I wrote........

I filed for a increase been out of work for 2 years worked till I couldn't stand the pain any more now I'm crippled up, if I knew it would take so long I would have taken action lonnggg ago. I called the 1-800# today ask about some file type someone gave me and was informed after a year and a half, I'm waiting on my 201 file for the PTSD, looking for combat medals unit citations I got them but I sent them some pictures of my US ARMY Vacation experiences to Gulf war 1 and Restore Joke in Somalia anyways, YES THATS RIGHT! you too can stand up be shot at on a daily basis and enjoy an evening fire fight just about dinner time! and not be counted(just kidding about that last part). I hear now you have to be Purple Heart or have a CIB to even be considered or Just be a Gulf war 2 Vet. I personal Have friends never fired a shot and got the big prize the "CIB" just for being in a country where there was a war. I personally think this is way unfair specially to the guys who truly earned them, people getting purple hearts for accidents? And I have to prove I was in a hostile environment in Somalia. I can truly tell ya I can't sleep cant go to a 4 of July for over 15 or 16 years now I feel for these guys coming back its a life time deal you never forget or get over. Does that mean I'm untiled to a CIB, absolutely not. I am a soldier or was and we fought for each other, sorry getting carried away just feel as if I'm supposed to be so much more unholy and pay the same price anyways.......

This was a VA rep told me this today is this true I'l receive less care and not even consided unless I have a Purple Heart or a CIB or served in this fresh war? is blaspheming poop or the real deal?

Edited by yoggie2
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yoggie,

The same thing happened in the RVN 30+ years ago: "Base Camp Commandos" making uneventful perimeter sweeps around said base camp once a month and ending up with a CIB.

Outrageous.

"Endeavor to persevere" regardless.

-- John D.

Edited by cloudcroft
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Man looks that no one wants to touch this one.

RC

Edited by yoggie2
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  • HadIt.com Elder

Voggie, are you saying that the VA is actually requiring you to provide some sort of documentation of the fact that you were in a "combat situation"? Do they not have your service records?

"I'm waiting on my 201 file for the PTSD, looking for combat medals unit citations I got them but I sent them some pictures of my US ARMY Vacation experiences to Gulf war 1 and Restore Joke in Somalia anyways,"

I don't think that "pictures" are gonna do the job..............

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Yes, in the sense I have to have a CIB or Purple Heart or Company journal or just serve in Gulf war #2. My Combat time in Gulf war 1 and constant combat in Somalia means nothing no count period towards any PTSD at least this is what I was told by VA rep. No matter how long my 201 file says I was in either place. Thought it impossible to find journals so thought give'um some pic's anyways.

Regards, RC

Edited by yoggie2
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yog,

I to was in somalia, with the marines. I to never got a combat action ribbon for taking fire and returning fire. we were told that somalia was a humanitarian operation. witch we know is bullshit. but we never got a c.a.r. now i did get 70& and i.u for ptsd becuase of somalia. that being said it can be done the va never brought up my ribbons and dont think that they can deny your claim just becuase you dont have a cib. what wins claims is medical evidence. by the way i missed the gulf war i was in bootcamp. so you can be service connected for somalia. sounds like the va is just messing with you. they did the same thing to me denied me 2 times before i won a total of almost 3 years.

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Yes, in the sense I have to have a CIB or Purple Heart or Company journal or just serve in Gulf war #2. My Combat time in Gulf war 1 and constant combat in Somalia means nothing no count period towards any PTSD at least this is what I was told by VA rep. No matter how long my 201 file says I was in either place. Thought it impossible to find journals so thought give'um some pic's anyways.

I believe everything is completely out of context. First of all, those of us that have PTSD and are S/C and have received a rating can all confirm that you are not being singled out "Just because you do not have CIB, CAR, PH, or other combat medal or award."

All of us and the VA requires in claim for PTSD based on a combat stressor is the stressor event must be furnished and the VA must be able to verify the stressor event took place via Buddy Statements, Unit diaries, journals, and/or from personnel and medical records. This is true for every veteran that files a claim for PTSD. That is called the "Stressor". The VA can contact the Center for Unit Records Research (CURR) when the stressor furnished is not documented in the vets records or documented by receipt of specific combat awards on DD-214.

As far as the PH, CIB, SS, BS, CIB, and CAR they are CONCEEDED stressor that is verification up front and automatically conceeded that the vet was exposed to a stressor event. If you have one or more of the listed combat awards you are not required to prove that a stressor event occurred nor provide a stressor letter that is verifiable.

There are only two ways to go to get the VA to accept a verifiable stressor event and that is if you don't have a "Conceeded stressor" then you must provide a detailed description of the stressor event or events, if you have one of the medals or awards then those are your proof of stressor event.

There are three things that are needed to be successful in a claim for PTSD and they are:

1) Verifiable Stressor Event

2) Diagnosis of PTSD

3) Nexus of service connection

If you have all three of these the VA cannot and will not deny your claim for PTSD.

You are not being singled out nor treated any differently than any other vet that is claiming service connected PTSD.

And your VSO is full of mumble jumble. He in fact lied to you. Whether you furnished a stressor event or the conceeded stressor medals is immaterial as far as VA treatment and benefits are concerned. A stressor is a stressor be it documented handwritten letter or documented receipt of combat award or medal. That's all they are used for period......to document the stressor.

You don't get any higher rating for the stressor or stressor events or even if you have twenty medals. All they the VA are looking for is just ONE stressor event. Your rating is based on your CURRENT (Today)occupational and relationship impairment and ratings are based on the severity of those alone.

Don't be cornfused! :^D

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Calnight, you have know idea how happy it is for me to hear this. I just figure I get treatment and no % for PTSD. I went through my 201 file and I had received a Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal(Somalia) probably don't mean crap . You are right there was nothing humanitarian about it. Where you stay our Company was at the US Embassy for week or two the moved out to the old tank factory. Man you guy's really caught hell in that circle of death down town, you could see it most of the time and at night the sky lit up like it was on fire.

Glad you made it. Rich

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Rocya1911, here's what I mean I'm not speaking for just my self here. I Had a friend had his leg nearly blow off with a AK47 on a humanitarian mission lot Soldiers got there asses handed to them and killed for their help, absolutely no infrastructure no stores completely bairn what you had is what you brang we all eat, sleep and fought like animals all of us. I come from a company of 220 Soldiers. We were under intense fighting at times my 201 file says's Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal(Somalia) that it. Now yes there's a stresser it will probably take me years to proove. I don't know about you I gave close to 9 years of service, I got a broke back can hardly walk along with mental crap I'll have for the rest of my life cause if it isn't gone it isn't gonna. I can't get in a car drive 1 1/2 hour with no money no gas and no job. So I try to get approved so I can see a doctor locally. Just seems it has gotten harder for me this is not about pity or money.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Yoggie. Read your discussion and efforts here. In proving up A stressor, along with your medal, you need facts and factors.

Questions to consider. Do you have your company name, dates, commanders, buddy names etc? Can you, a family member or close freind help write out your events that you experienced? Names, dates, places as best at possible. How these affected you then and now. Do you have a current medical diagnosis supporting the same from IMO? Can you "Tell your story" back it up with medical and military facts? Does your story describe issues that impact or limit (or other more specific words...) your daily relationships and employment?

....da best to ya,cg

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Yoggie. Read your discussion and efforts here. In proving up A stressor, along with your medal, you need facts and factors.

Questions to consider. Do you have your company name, dates, commanders, buddy names etc? Can you, a family member or close freind help write out your events that you experienced? Names, dates, places as best at possible. How these affected you then and now. Do you have a current medical diagnosis supporting the same from IMO? Can you "Tell your story" back it up with medical and military facts? Does your story describe issues that impact or limit (or other more specific words...) your daily relationships and employment?

....da best to ya,cg

This make it easier to understand

I get it.

. I have been out of service for 12+ years, Just could not digest all rocky was saying. Just seem its just plane easy for some and hard for most and "I" being part of most. If I knew things would have turned out this way I'd have every thing. Yes I have most info on file 201 file and DD214. I guess the VA counselor got me going on something she didn't know much about, sorry get flustard and confuse my self even more. Just seem so wrong and unfair at the time when they (VA)to drop a bomb on me like that. ugh.... I know it will come but it sure would have helped to know this year and a half ago.

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yoggie,

The same thing happened in the RVN 30+ years ago: "Base Camp Commandos" making uneventful perimeter sweeps around said base camp once a month and ending up with a CIB.

Outrageous.

"Endeavor to persevere" regardless.

-- John D.

I was one of those "Base Camp Commandos" who made uneventful perimeter sweeps around our "base" in Vietnam. I did not deserve nor receive any combat-related award. Ohhh...by the way, we preferred to be referred to as REMFs, rather than Base Camp Commandos.

Cheers!

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Dear Yoggie2...here are the steps to filing for PTSD hope this helps...

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

RECEIVING DISABILITY FOR PTSD

There are two basic steps to receive a disability from the Veterans Administration for PTSD. The first step is filing a claim with the VA for PTSD. The second, and most Important, is submitting a stressor letter. Most combat veterans do not trust the government or the VA. This is understandable considering the treatment most veterans received during and after the Vietnam War. But the VA has improved in most places, and the benefits are there for the combat veterans. The VA does not go looking for the combat veteran with PTSD. You mush push aside any bad feelings and make the effort to receive the earned benefits.

FILING A CLAIM

As ridiculous at It may seem, ail combat veterans must not only prove that they were In combat, they must also prove that they were In the military. This process screens out the phony combat veterans. It is surprising how many combat veterans have surfaced who were on top secret missions, and of course, there is no record of their even being in the military because their missions were so secret.

You can file a claim on your own, but there are several veteran’s organizations who will represent you on a disability claim. The best of these is probably the American Veterans (AMVETS), since their primary purpose Is helping the veterans file claims for disability. It you do not have an AMVETS office in your area where you can meet with a service officer, you can call the nearest AMVETS office and tell them you want to file a claim for disability. The AMVETS, will send you a power of attorney. You sign this paper and send it back through the mail. This gives the AMVETS your permission to represent you in your claim. The AMVETS opens your claim and forwards it to the VA regional office in your area. Opening the claim is actually a simple process.

THE STRESSOR LETTER

This is the single most important factor In obtaining disability for the combat veteran. After your claim has been filed, usually within 30 to 60 days, you will receive a letter from the VA stating that they have received your claim for PTSD. Then you will be asked to submit a stressor letter. This is a written record of combat experiences which you felt were life threatening or have caused you to display symptoms of PTSD. They will also note that they understand how difficult this can be for some veterans (thinking about war experiences and writing them down). And for many this is difficult. Some can't write well. Some are to terrified to think in detail about their war experience.

Chances are the average veteran cannot write a stressor letter that will pass the rating board. Once a stressor letter has been rejected by the rating board, the process to receive disability can be long and discouraging. Many veterans give up and never receive the disability they deserve. The VA will tell-you how to write the letter or what details to include. If the letter is rejected, many combat veterans will give up before appealing the rating board decision. So a veteran must submit a solid stressor letter to pass the rating board. This is my area of expertise. I know what to put in the letter and how to present it so that the rating board will grant any where from 10% to 50% disability just from your stressor letter without rejection and VA appeal hearings. It will be impossible to receive a 100% rating from a stressor letter, but once the VA agrees you are disabled, you can appeal for a higher percentage.

PTSD IS A RECOGNIZED DISORDER WHICH DOES NOT GO AWAY. THE REACTIONS TO COMBAT STRESS OFTEN BECOMES A PERMANENT PART OF THE VETERAN'S PERSONALITY.

WHAT COMES NEXT: THE COMP EXAM

At some point after you file for disability, either before or after you have submitted your stressor letter, you will receive a letter asking you to come to the nearest VA Hospital in your area for a Compensation Examination. This just means that you are going to speak to a VA psychiatrist. The psychiatrist will ask you many questions about your background (including your childhood and current social life) and your war service. The meeting with the doctor will probably last anywhere from 20 to 45 minutes. The VA will also reimburse you with a small travel allowance for coming.

You must show up for this comp exam. If for some reason you can't make it, then call the VA and they will schedule you again. Most of all, relax. This psychiatrist is not your enemy, and ft is his or her job to send a report to the VA regional office as to whether you show symptoms of PTSD. The psychiatrist Is Impartial. If you show symptoms of PTSD, it will be reported without any favor toward the VA. So relax and answer questions to the best of your knowledge. Always stress the negative side of your life...never the positive. Just like at the close of the stressor letter. You can do this and still tell the truth just by avoiding the positive. Here are some things not to say at a Comp Exam.

1. My life is okay. Ifs not or you wouldn't be there.

2. I sometimes hear voices. Hearing voices can lead to a diagnosis of schizophrenia, and your PTSD claim may be rejected.

3. I am happily married. It has often been decided that having PTSD automatically means an unhappy marriage. It can but not always.

4. I love my job. I have been there twenty years. If you have managed to keep one job, it may be determined that you interact normally and do not have PTSD. You can have one job and still be miserable. It's a matter of survival.

5. I have lots of friends. Never admit you have lots of friends. Chances are you don't anyway. At least, not like the friends you made in combat situations who you can trust with your life.

6. Don't threaten the doctor. Some veterans scream, yell, and threaten to kill the doctor in an attempt to show symptoms of PTSD. 99% of the time this is an act and won't help your claim.

The main thing is to stress the negative side of your life, just as in the end of the stressor letter. If you have had a substance abuse problem since before your war service, it would be best not to mention it. Stress the fact that you are depressed and have nightmares and feel that the war has altered your life1. Just remember to stress the negative instead of anything positive in your life.

WHAT TO INCLUDE IN A STRESSOR LETTER

1. Name, Rank. Service Number, Dates of Time in War Zone:

Make sure your current correct address and claim number are at the top of your stressor letter. Begin by re-stating your name, rank, and service number. Then begin with your war service. Do not mention time spent in the United Slates. Many veterans ramble on about stateside service, and this has nothing to do with combat stress, if your MOS or specialty was something other than combat related (supply, motor transport, ate.) but you did not serve in your MOS or specialty, mention it here because the VA will turn you down unless you prove you were in combat If you were in Special Forces or Recon, etc., don't go into any detail about stateside training.

2. Were you wounded?:

If you were wounded Include dates, If possible, and number of times wounded. This refers only to wounds which ware treated by medics, corpsmen, or doctors for which you received a purple heart and are a matter of record. If you have malaria or any type malaria fever and were treated for it, mention it also, if you believe it may be in your records.

3. If you killed the enemy:

Include the times you actually saw the enemy and killed them. Be specific if possible. Don't say something like (my outfit killed 53 NVA in the fire fight). This is too general. State what you were doing when the enemy was killed and how it affected you. (I kept firing and I could see them falling as they ran toward us).

4. If you saw Americans die:

Most combat vets lost close friends in combat. For some vets remembering names is difficult, but this will definitely help your claim if you can remember the approximate date and names of men in your outfit killed while you were there. If someone killed was your best friend, mention it and how it affected you. The names will be checked by the VA against KIA lists. If friends were wounded bad enough to be shipped home, you may mention this and include their names if possible. (This is all verification that you were in combat. Try to use real names instead of nicknames at all times).

5. If you saw civilian dead:

In villages, the jungle, or other places. This was traumatic to many combat troops, especially if they had to handle the bodies. Seeing dead children often has long range effects on combat vets, particularly if the children or civilians were killed during fire fights or mistaken for the enemy.

6. If you were on body detail:

Or if you otherwise handled the bodies of dead Americans, either in the field or in the rear where the bodies were stripped for shipment home. This often causes extreme trauma to those who handled the bodies.

7. Times you did not think you would survive:

Incidents when you thought you would not be alive the next day help with a PTSD claim. When you had given up hope and thought for sure you would be killed with no chance of survival. (Describe in detail).

8. All incidents of combat:

Small arms fire, fire fights, mortar and rocket attacks, booby traps, mines, artillery, etc. Each time you were in a life threatening situation whether you were able to return fire or not. (Walking through mine fields, walking point, etc.)

9. Names of operations or search and destroy:

Remembering names of specific field operations and sweeps can often be helpful because the military often left much Information out of service records. Some combat troops have very complete service records. Others have had their records lost or destroyed, or Information was never entered. Any Information you can remember about field operations Is verification of combat role.

10. How your life has changed because of the war:

State your problems today because of your war service. Divorce, substance abuse, nightmares, paranoia, trouble holding jobs, lack of feeling, etc. If you have been in therapy or other treatment, mention this. Stress the negative side of your life. Mention nothing good that has happened to you. Don’t say you get along great with people and you are happy most of the lime. Stress that life is a constant struggle due to your combat service, (You used to love fireworks but now when you hear them you hit the ground. You used to love to go to sporting events but now you can't cope with being in crowds, etc.)

NOTE: These ten points will help you write a stressor letter which will have a good chance of passing the VA rating board. When writing about combat, write how it affected you personally. Don't write stuff like…(We sat around and ate dinner and then the sergeant told us a story about his wife and then Joe tried to steal my bean and wieners). Too many vets go in to detail which Is not important. Begin each segment of combat with the combat and how it affected you. (You were scared. You thought you were going to die, etc.). Many veterans are afraid to mention certain situations when they killed people for fear of charges being brought against them. This will not happen. Killings during combat are for survival. The government would have to prove you killed on purpose without just cause, and in the case of enemy troops and civilians, this is not possible.

Many of these ten points overlap with each other. You must try to put them in some kind of order. Think about what you want to say for a few weeks before writing it down. Then try to arrange your thoughts in some kind of order. The best solution is to be brief and to the point. This is difficult for many veterans, which is why so many veterans with PTSD never follow through with a claim. The best average length for a stressor letter is not more than four pages single-spaced.

The % here is what the VA raters will assigned based on the results of your medical evidence...now once you are assigned a rating and you are not happy with it you can request an increase (that is another area best left after you are rated)

0%

Neurotic symptoms which may somewhat adversely affect relationships with others but which do not cause impairment of working ability.

10%

The psychoneurotic disorder produces mild social and Industrial Impairment.

30%

The symptoms result in such reduction in Initiative, flexibility, efficiency, and reliability levels as to produce definite Industrial Impairment There will be definite impairment in the ability to establish or maintain effective and wholesome relationships with people.

50%

The veteran’s ability to establish or maintain effective or favorable relationships with people is considerably impaired. By reason of psychoneurotic symptoms the reliability, flexibility, and efficiency levels are so reduced as to result in considerable industrial Impairment.

70%

The disability severely impairs the veteran’s ability to establish and maintain effective or favorable relationships with people. The psychoneurotic symptoms are of such severity and persistence that there is severe impairment in the ability to obtain and retain employment.

100%

The attitudes of all contacts except the most Intimate are so adversely affected as to result in virtual isolation in the community. Total Incapacitating psychoneurotic symptoms bordering on gross repudiation of reality with disturbed thought or behavioral processes associated with almost all daily activities such as fantasy, confusion, panic, and explosions of aggressive energy resulting in profound retreat from mature behavior will be present. He or she will be demonstrably unable to obtain or retain employment

After the C/P exam they will rate you with a GAF score...the following score relates to how you are functining in your life..the higher the GAF the better functioning you are.

100-91

Superior functioning in a wide range of activities. Life's problems never seem to get out of hand, is sought out by others because of his or her many positive qualities. No symptoms.

90-81

Absent or minimum symptoms (e.g. mild anxiety before an exam), good functioning in all areas, interested and involved in a wide range of activities, socially effective, generally satisfied with life, no more than everyday problems or concerns ("e.g.. an occasional argument with family members).

80-71

If symptoms are present, they are transient and expectable reactions to psychosocial stressors (e.g., difficulty concentrating after family argument); no more than slight impairment in social, occupational, or school functioning (e.g… temporarily failing behind in schoolwork).

70-61

Some mild symptoms (e.g., depressed mood and mild insomnia) OR some difficulty in social, occupational, or school functioning (e.g., occasional truancy, or theft within the household), but generally functioning pretty well, has some meaningful interpersonal relationships.

60-51

Moderate symptoms (e.g.. flat affect and circumstantial speech, occasional panic attacks) OR moderate difficulty in social, occupational, or school functioning (e.g., few friends, conflicts with peers or co-workers).

50-41

Serious symptoms (e.g., suicidal ideation, severe obsessional rituals, frequent shoplifting) OR any serious impairment in social, occupational, or school functioning (e.g., no friends, unable to keep a job).

40-31

Some impairment in reality testing or communication (e.g... speech is at times illogical, obscure, or irrelevant) OR major impairment in several areas, such as work or school, family relations, judgment, thinking, or mood (e.g… depressed man avoids friends, neglects family, and is unable to work: child frequently beats up younger children. Is defiant at home, and is failing at school).

30-21

Behavior is considerably influenced by delusions or hallucinations OR serious impairment in communication or judgment (e.g., sometimes incoherent, acts grossly inappropriately, suicidal preoccupation) OR inability to function in almost all areas. (e.g… stays in bed all day; no job, home, or friends).

20-11

Some danger of hurting self or others (e.g., suicide attempts without clear expectation of death, frequency violent; manic excitement) OR occasionally fails to maintain minimal personal hygiene (e.g… smears feces) OR gross impairment in communication (e.g., largely incoherent or mute.)

10-01

Persistent danger of severely hurting self or others. (e.g… recurrent violence) OR recurrent inability to maintain minimal personal hygiene OR Serious suicidal act with clear expectation of death.

0

Inadequate information

Are you ready to File a PTSD Claim?

Now that you have read about Stressors and Gaff scores and finding a service officer lets think about one other area you need to be prepared for. Your chances of getting a higher rating are diminished greatly if you have not been under the care of a shrink, have not had meds given to you for PTSD symptoms and also if you have not been going to the either the shrink, social worker or a PTSD group or all of these for at least 6 months on a regular basis. You must show that you have tried to have your illness treated. This carries allot of weight with your claim. I feel you need to do the following to strengthen you claim.

First get a complete copy of your VA records, you will have to sign for them and usually wait a few weeks, once you have these copies carry them with you Always when you go to the VA, especially your records con­cerning your PTSD claim. Remember the VA has the bad habit of losing your records. Have them updated at least quarterly.

Go to your Shrink, the Dr. that ordered your meds, any group leader you have had for PTSD group, any social worker and any civilian Dr. you have worked with and ask them all to write you a Personal Letter rating you with the severity of your PTSD and also have them include your Gaff score in the letter. They will not offer these letters and don't ask for a letter in front of others do it privately. You should never be refused. The letter may not say what you want but the chances of you getting a solid letter from them is highly likely. Once you have these letters have them included in your file by your Service Officer. Do not trust that the VA will include them. Always have them with you at all times also.

I would recommend that when possible that you do not subject yourself to a extended lock down for PTSD, Try using group or one on one counseling in lieu of this or PTSD group.

Remember if you don't show emotion and tears in your interviews or groups that you are probably going to go no where with your claim. 1 know it's hard and you have in many cases had your feelings hidden for years now, but you have to release them. This is not the time for you to be sucking up your pain as you have been doing for years. Don't try and be a hard ass and don't ever curse or threaten your Dr. or go there under the in­fluence of any drugs or alcohol other than what has been prescribed by the VA to you. You will find that not only will this benefit your claim but it will also benefit your personal well being by helping you expunge many of the horrors you experienced in combat.

When you go for your C & P. Take your records and these letters with you and offer them Before the C & P begins. Chances are they won't have this information. This same applies if you apply for Social Security.

Remember if you end up with a total disability rating of 70% or more for PTSD or a combination of Service Connected disabilities you are considered unemployable (that's assuming you are not working ) and you can get 100% from the VA and if you have worked enough quarters from Social Security also.

I encourage you to call me if I can assist you, If you like call me prior to a C & P maybe I can help you get a idea on what's going to occur in this very important meeting. Don't forget we did things by the numbers in the Military if you do them by the numbers for your claim your chances of being turned down the first time have been greatly decreased. The least that will happen is that out of the gate whatever rating you get will be higher than it would have been without this supportive information. You can always appeal a lower rating which is al­lot easier to appeal than a flat denial.

Welcome Home and Good Luck

Vietnam Veterans of America info on PTSD

Edited by mountain tyme
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ONe factor which I did not read in any responses, excuse me if I missed it was that ANY Veteran who attempts to file a claim nthout going through say the DAV is going to have a hard time. The DAV sole purpose is to work with you on your claim with the VA. Yes other organizations do well, but this is the DAV's job.

I tell any young Veteran today, contact the DAV, get that claim number. This can be done off the internet www.dav.org or contact the local office closest to you and tell them you would like assistance in putting in a claim for disability. They will set up your comp and pen.

Go to the VA, see a doctor, shrink etc what ever, make visits quarterly if possible. Let them see you are attending the hospital, clinic.

Do not go this alone.

Stresses are tremendously important, in my case I have a CIB, Purple Heart, Bronze Star with "v" device, Air Medal etc. with paper work to back them up.

Unfortunatley yes there are people who went above and beyound and never received a medal which they diserved, but stressers deffinatley count.

At the time of filing start on your stressor letters, have your family, friends, Veteran buddies who served with you etc can write letters also to be submitted. I would suggest having them noterized, this way they are official. Nothing like writing some bs letter. Don't even go there. Have these letters available when you turn in your paper work for final hearing.

And for those who have received their compensation, a smart move is to continue to go to see you pc, shrink take your mneds, make every appointment, if not your fooling yourself. A lot of Vets got or get their checks then disappear, Uncle will grab your check and stop sending them.

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"A lot of Vets got or get their checks then disappear, Uncle will grab your check and stop sending them."

SSGMike.Ivy

That sounds illegal, let alone sidestepping "due process"...if the vet is still alive and entitled to receive his/her checks, even if he/she "disappeared" to live in another country as some vets do.

Can you cite some cases where this has happened?

-- John D.

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What I meant first to get a reaction from the members here, who knew what I meant.

The statement should read if your supposed to see doctors, shrinks, take medications and follow ups with the VA and you do not, you can be called in for re-evaluation. With all the changes going on within the VA involving benfits, shortages, delays, cutbacks etc it is extrememly important to follow the rules.

"A lot of Vets got or get their checks then disappear, Uncle will grab your check and stop sending them."

SSGMike.Ivy

That sounds illegal, let alone sidestepping "due process"...if the vet is still alive and entitled to receive his/her checks, even if he/she "disappeared" to live in another country as some vets do.

Can you cite some cases where this has happened?

-- John D.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Non Combat PTSD?

For Veterans who suffer from PTSD symptoms due to toxic or physical trauma, would submitting scientific evidence supporting the nexus, along with history of treatment for PTSD and exposures to toxins/trauma, be the same as a stressor letter?

Thanks for any replies.

Allan

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Mountain, I too use this VVA template style for organizng my thoughts and deeds! Good addition, collect and file all the info all in a notebook. Personally, I work on keeping my things indexed and use those fancy see through page protectors. cg

Edited by cowgirl
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Hello

Allan wrote:

Non Combat PTSD?

For Veterans who suffer from PTSD symptoms due to toxic or physical trauma, would submitting scientific evidence supporting the nexus, along with history of treatment for PTSD and exposures to toxins/trauma, be the same as a stressor letter?

Thanks for any replies.

Allan

Hello Allan...

A stressor letter....should contain in detail what event or exposure caused the emotional trauma in your life, that was life altering to you. Which would include "would submitting scientific evidence supporting the nexus, along with history of treatment for PTSD and exposures to toxins/trauma" in your letter. For example...a very good friend of mine that I was stationed with while in the AF worked for CE as a plumber...he use to have to work around toxic chemicals that were used as coolant for missles...at the time PPE, OSHA, MSDS were not implemented at that time now we are talking early 70's...to make a long story short some of his coworkers developed liver cancer which caused great stress to him due to his exposure...he became paranoid to even go near any of the chemical's...so yes your stressor letter can point out that being exposed to toxic chemicals and the result of your friends or commrades dying from that expose she can cause PTSD exp. if it was not treated early on...PTS is stress and aniexty and if not treated early on it will develop into PTSD (d as in disorder). Personnal Truma in a stressor letter involving Personnal Truma it could be based on sexual harrasement, emotional trauma from working in a protential dangerous area...you could be a dental hygenist and have the task of identifying bodies through dental records...everyone has a threshold of what there individual emotional level can handle...based on there life experiance or beliefs...it is not uncommon for non-combat vets to develop PTSD...no matter what war or conflict one has been exposed to...not knowing what the outcome will be...the feeling of impending doom triggers something in the mind...that can not process that nagging feeling..

So if you are going to file for PTSD as S/C...you need to write a letter explaining the events of exposure that has caused emotional harm to you.

Even in non combat situlations buddy statements is a plus because then can support the general feeling at that time...what they observed...they can attest to how YOU handled everyday events...if you were anixious...weepy...uptight...arugmentive...they can bring out that you changed...

keep in mind...as the VET you have to piece it together like a time line...so the VA can understand who, where, what, and when this was all going on.

hope this helps

MT

Edited by mountain tyme
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  • HadIt.com Elder

Hello Mountain tyme,

thank you for the reply.

I understand if PTSD is due to emotional trauma stresser letter is needed defining the event.

But, if the PTSD is due to physical trauma, than what.

Allan

Hello

Allan wrote:

Non Combat PTSD?

For Veterans who suffer from PTSD symptoms due to toxic or physical trauma, would submitting scientific evidence supporting the nexus, along with history of treatment for PTSD and exposures to toxins/trauma, be the same as a stressor letter?

Thanks for any replies.

Allan

Hello Allan...

A stressor letter....should contain in detail what event or exposure caused the emotional trauma in your life, that was life altering to you. Which would include "would submitting scientific evidence supporting the nexus, along with history of treatment for PTSD and exposures to toxins/trauma" in your letter. For example...a very good friend of mine that I was stationed with while in the AF worked for CE as a plumber...he use to have to work around toxic chemicals that were used as coolant for missles...at the time PPE, OSHA, MSDS were not implemented at that time now we are talking early 70's...to make a long story short some of his coworkers developed liver cancer which caused great stress to him due to his exposure...he became paranoid to even go near any of the chemical's...so yes your stressor letter can point out that being exposed to toxic chemicals and the result of your friends or commrades dying from that expose she can cause PTSD exp. if it was not treated early on...PTS is stress and aniexty and if not treated early on it will develop into PTSD (d as in disorder). Personnal Truma in a stressor letter involving Personnal Truma it could be based on sexual harrasement, emotional trauma from working in a protential dangerous area...you could be a dental hygenist and have the task of identifying bodies through dental records...everyone has a threshold of what there individual emotional level can handle...based on there life experiance or beliefs...it is not uncommon for non-combat vets to develop PTSD...no matter what war or conflict one has been exposed to...not knowing what the outcome will be...the feeling of impending doom triggers something in the mind...that can not process that nagging feeling..

So if you are going to file for PTSD as S/C...you need to write a letter explaining the events of exposure that has caused emotional harm to you.

Even in non combat situlations buddy statements is a plus because then can support the general feeling at that time...what they observed...they can attest to how YOU handled everyday events...if you were anixious...weepy...uptight...arugmentive...they can bring out that you changed...

keep in mind...as the VET you have to piece it together like a time line...so the VA can understand who, where, what, and when this was all going on.

hope this helps

MT

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"A lot of Vets got or get their checks then disappear, Uncle will grab your check and stop sending them."

SSGMike.Ivy

That sounds illegal, let alone sidestepping "due process"...if the vet is still alive and entitled to receive his/her checks, even if he/she "disappeared" to live in another country as some vets do.

Can you cite some cases where this has happened?

-- John D.

well i moved to the philippines and of course the VA here is a plane ride away for me so i started to see a private doctor 2 times a month and a year goes by and the VA sends me a letter saying they are setting up a CP for me ... i am over 55 70% IU and PT so i had my doctor write up a report and i brought it with me and i was in and out .. but if i did not have a report or did not see a doctor i am pretty sure i would of be looking at,,,,,,,,,,,,,, oh your cured no need to keep sending you a check..

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