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C/p Tomorrow For Gerd


mountain tyme

Question

Hello..

I could use some insight into this matter. I am helping a fellow vet with his claim for S/C Gerds.

After reviewing his Service Medical Records I found these noted in his military medical records.

He is a 22 year Veteran retired Military 1994

Chronological record of Medical Care

10 Dec. 93 509th Medical Group, Whiteman AFB

Occupational Health Physical Examination

See Question H: Stomach pains; change in bowel habits? Yes

7H: He has a lot of acid Ind. Use's a lot of tums.

14Dec93: Pt in for follow-up on occupational PE

c/o reflux sis esp. when lying down supine

A-probable GER

Feb 22, 1994 509th Medical Group Whiteman AFB, MO.

*C/O acid indigestion and reflux

A-(2) Reflux/ GER

continue taking anacids.

retired in July 94

after retirement he continued using antiacids until it became intolable around 96 VA started treating him for GERDS with prescription medication.

He filed for GERDS in Mar 07 though the VA.

He will be having his c/p tomorrow...

question will the entries in his Service Medical records be enough to show the condition existed while in the military?

Thanks

MT

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if there is a diagnosis of gerd at VA examination, service connection should be awarded. a rater would have to reach pretty far to dismiss the evidence of treatment in service, even though it arguably doesn't strictly meet the six month chronicity standard.

the examiner will ask your vet about specific symptoms and the frequency of recurrence. an evaluation of 10 percent would be warranted if there are two or more recurrent symptoms of: heartburn, difficulty swallowing, reflux/regurgitation, and substernal pain. the next higher evaluation of 30 percent would require evidence of symptomatology together with impairment of health.

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Hello entropent,

When you said " even though it arguably doesn't strictly meet the six month chronicity standard."

as in 6 month of treatment while on active duty? He has been under treatment for about 13 years of medication therapy. He has a diagnois of Gerds doctumented in his VA medical records as well. But, after he has a scope done at the univeristy hospital about a year ago and they found a sliding hernia and some damage due to the reflux he decided to put in a VA claim. I checked his SMR and there are notations thoughout his 22 years of service that states he was having acid indigestion...but there was no Mention of GER or GERDS until 94. He stated that he ate tums like candy and then if that didn't do the job he would use Milanta or other over the counter medication for acid indigestion he stated he never heard the word Gerds used until 94 but when he went to the VA after he retired (he is 40% connected for his back) and has 0% for quite a few other conditions but he never thought about the Gerds...now if it was bothering him during the intake of information he would have said something then...as well as his hypertention which he has also applied for I looked over his SMR and found at least 3 area's where he was to have a 5 day testing for his high blood pressure but it was never done because when it was an issure it was screened at the time of deployment or TDY and when he would return after 90 days or so he forgot all about it...but his blood preassure did run high by his medical records a year after retiring a civilan doctor put him on high blood pressure medicine due to his blood pressure was out of control...

but anyways as always I got off the subject at hand.

MT

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MT, yes, i was talking about chronicity measured by symptoms persisting for a period of six months or more on active duty. i would be very surprised if a rater did backflips trying to argue that the condition was acute and resolved on active duty. raters like a "quick hit," they have to move cases, after all.

with his 40 percent back, a 10 percent for gerd should get him to the 50 percent threshold, which will entitle him to concurrent receipt. he should be quite sure the doctor knows about the specific symptoms (check my last post).

i am less sanguine about your vet's hypertension claim. it is a pretty significant thing that he never went for a five-day blood pressure check while on active duty. does he have the treatment records showing that the condition manifest to a compensable degree within one year of service? by that, i mean did he have diastolic pressures (the second number) repeatedly measured at 100 or more? just getting put on meds within a year is not enough.

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entropent,

actully on the high blood pressure...they did do a three day right before he was deployed...and the flight doctor recommended in his record a Low sodium diet and to restrict caffine...but on the other two occassions when he came back from TDY his blood pressue would border line...as everyone know's it is not uncommon to see a differnt doctor everytime you go in...and being that this vet did not know that this could be a serious problem...also to...by looking at his records...I notice that BP was not done that often back in the 70's, 80's but by the 90's it was more common place in his records...so the only conclusion I can gather by what he has said that it wasn't a big issue...blind trust is what I say...

but it is a moot point now...he is on medication to control the BP so it will be up to the VA call to that.

The Gerds I feel will be a given...and when the other items he has 0% become worse I told him he can put in for an increase at that time...

well thank you so much for your insight..on this matter.

I created a timeline for him to bring with him outlining dates on his smr so he can give it to the C/p doctor to make it easier for him along with a copy of the medical record that it pretains to...I know they already have his medical records but it is always nice to have it outlined for easy review...that is what I think

have a great evening

MT

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