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Va Meds Caue Severe Gi Problems


jbasser

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I went to my Family Doc yesterday outside of the VA. ( Could not get in to the VA) with severe GI problems. He asked me to give him a med list and he examined me. He got really upset. A lot of my meds are taken together have no business of being taken together. He ordered blood work and gave me some powerful gi meds.

Can a person file an 1151 claim for this. I may have ruined my stomach lining.

J

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  • HadIt.com Elder

I know the feeling the meds I get are often very short of instructions on when to take.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

I'd kinda hold off on the 1151.

'cause they may want to take a look at your stomach lining.............

Trust me, there ain't nuttin like it, swallowing that 35mm Nikon........... B)

I'd wait a bit....see if things kinda calm down, down there.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

You might try to get SC'ed for any symptoms or diseases you have due to these drugs. Things like GERD are common result of pain meds. Will it net you any cash is the point.

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:) I will let it ride for a few weeks to see what the outcome is.

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Jbasser- if a vet's SC meds cause them additional ratable problems -these side affects can be rated as secondary.

But based on what your doctor said-

I would file a claim under both secondary SC due to that basis and also a claim under Sec 1151.

Your private doctor must have seen that VA was giving you meds that are contraindicated by other meds they are giving you or by your medical condition itself.

That is medical negligence and can have drastic long term affects.

It is one reason my husband is dead. He was on 2 meds. one contraindicated the other.

This was part of the OCG medical report when the VA settled with me for wrongful death.Sudafed -for a sinus condition he didnt even have- prescribed 4 times a day-aggravated his misdiagnosed heart disease and caused his HBP meds to be inaffective and was one factor in the VA's admission to causing his death.

If the private doc would put in writing what he found (and I am sure he made a definite change on your meds)-that is good evidence too- anything to document the change in meds-

or even if he won't write anything--

you have very valid basis for a claim under Sec 1151,38 USC-if you have problems that are attributable to these medical errors.

The evidence you can attach to the claim -if the doctor will not support it- is the printouts of all these meds- highlight the printputs as to what is contraindicated and send VA a copy of your medication profile.

The blood work he ordered might well reveal any damage this medical error caused.

Try to obtain that report too.

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