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Ssa For Disable Veterans


Maurice

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Disable Veteran didn't pay enough in SSA to get SSA or SSDI that what SSA told him on the phone to get benefits. Is that true? What should he do? He need help to get SSA

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Yes, it's probably true. Even a SS lawyer can't help with that...it's the law.

I'm sure there are a number of vets in the same boat: They haven't worked for years -- or they worked only marginally -- so they haven't put in the quarters (SS $$) during the 10 years previous to getting TDIU from the VA (which has no such requirement)...so they don't qualify for any SSD (I guess SSA is the same).

I'm one of them.

It's a Catch-22: You can't work due to your disabilities -- so naturally you aren't putting in any SS $$/quarters -- so you don't get the required quarters in to qualify for SSD, but you couldn't get the quarters to qualify because you couldn't work due to your disabilities...what SSD is supposed to compensate you for.

So, you have to have been able to work ENOUGH quarters (putting SS $$ in) for the previous 10 year period to qualify for SSD, but if you work TOO MUCH you won't get SSD or even TDIU.

Gotcha.

He might try for TDIU (if qualified), get his VA disability rating increased if he is already rated, or GET a rating if he doesn't have one yet (along with getting SCed for it of course)...but SS is probably out of the question.

- John D.

Edited by cloudcroft
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  • HadIt.com Elder

There are a couple of things you can do when denied for Social Security. But the first thing is to remember that Social Security is usually much more helpful than the VA

Ask SS to help amend the forms that probably state that the disability is actually the date that the application was made changing this to the date that was the last work day usually helps secure the quarters needed. Also Most Veterans are entitled to a credit for each quarter worked when they served. This credit can also help the Veteran.

Good Luck

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...Also Most Veterans are entitled to a credit for each quarter worked when they served. This credit can also help the Veteran.

Good Luck

The credit I received for active service bumped my social security (begins Dec07) by $120 a month. However, I was on active duty for a substantial amount of time.

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Pete,

"Also Most Veterans are entitled to a credit for each quarter worked when they served."

Even if that service was 30 years ago?

-- John D.

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From Social Security web site:

Extra earnings

Your Social Security benefit depends on your earnings, averaged over your working lifetime. Generally, the higher your earnings, the higher your Social Security benefit. Under certain circumstances, special earnings can be credited to your military pay record for Social Security purposes. The extra earnings are for periods of active duty or active duty for training. These extra earnings may help you qualify for Social Security or increase the amount of your Social Security benefit. Social Security will add these extra earnings to your earnings record when you file for benefits.

If you served in the military from 1940 through 1956, including attendance at a service academy, you did not pay Social Security taxes. However, we will credit you with $160 a month in earnings for military service from September 16, 1940, through December 31, 1956, if:

  • You were honorably discharged after 90 or more days of service, or you were released because of a disability or injury received in the line of duty; or
  • You are applying for survivors benefits based on a veteran’s work and the veteran died while on active duty.

You cannot receive these special credits if you are receiving a federal ­benefit based on the same years of service, unless you were on active duty after 1956. If you were on active duty after 1956, you can get the special credit for 1951 through 1956, even if you are receiving a military retirement based on service during that period.

If you served in the military from 1957 through 1977, you are credited with $300 in additional earnings for each calendar quarter in which you received active duty basic pay.

If you served in the military from 1978 through 2001, you are credited with an additional $100 in earnings, up to a maximum of $1,200 a year, for every $300 in active duty basic pay. After 2001, additional earnings are no longer credited.

If you began your service after September 7, 1980, and did not complete at least 24 months of active duty or your full tour, you may not be able to receive the additional earnings. Check with us for more information. NOTE: In all cases, the additional earnings are credited to the earnings that we average over your working lifetime, not directly to your monthly benefit amount

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Thanks for the info...

That helps you over your working life re: your SS earnings, but how does military service 30 years ago help if the SS people only look at your prevous 10 years? I'm still not getting it.

As I said, I was turned down for SSDI when I applied for it a few years ago because they said I hadn't enough quarters the previous 10 years. So I didn't pursue it further. My last military service ended in 1978.

-- John D.

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If your service ended in 1978 and you havent been able to work since then, the question becomes why havent you applied? Not nosey, just trying to help sort it out here on the board. Have you at least worked intermittently at a job that paid some social security? or health issues? or?

I too have been trying to get my quarters up to 20 in last few years before my body and brain go kaput. SSI isnt an option for me. I believe SSDI is correct, but I still have to qualify. I am not TDIU at teh VA yet, for you that may be a "help", though I'm not sure.Keep posting,cg

"As I said, I was turned down for SSDI when I applied for it a few years ago because they said I hadn't enough quarters the previous 10 years. So I didn't pursue it further. My last military service ended in 1978."

-- John D.

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i've seen this also, this brings up a good point to remember if you are totally disabled for over 6 months and the doctor doesn't expect you to improve enough to be able to work. apply for social security, so many veterans wait - personally i couldn't do the paperwork i was in pretty bad shape i let them sit in a drawer for over a year before a friend found out and took me through it step by step, i got my social security pretty quickly the first time, but i did loose about a years worth of pay.

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http://www.ssa.gov/dibplan/dqualify.htm

There is a lot of info here at hadit on SSA as well as many SSA web sites and forums.

I believe that someone has to have worked within 5 years of applying for SSA and they are strict on the credit criteria.

Then again SSI is also something that they will consider as part of any SSA application-

the disability requirements are the same as SSA but this is benefit is limited by any other income and might have the same credit reqirements too.

The SSA regs are all on line.

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Thanks for the info...

That helps you over your working life re: your SS earnings, but how does military service 30 years ago help if the SS people only look at your prevous 10 years? I'm still not getting it.

As I said, I was turned down for SSDI when I applied for it a few years ago because they said I hadn't enough quarters the previous 10 years. So I didn't pursue it further. My last military service ended in 1978.

-- John D.

Sorry, I was just looking at the social security increase (added "earnings") that is applicable to military service. Obviously it doesn't add the quarters you need.

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Cowgirl,

No, 1978 is just the date I was medically-retired (with 30%) from the USCG, not the date when I worked last. I had been in undergrad and then grad school for the early part of the previous 10-year period the SS people looked at, and "working marginally" after I graduated from grad school for the latter part of that 10-year period, so I just didn't have enough SS quarters to qualify for SSDI. Being in school full-time I wasn't working at all and when I got out, I only worked "marginally." That "dry spell" ate up most all of that "rolling" 10-year period SS looks at.

So I guess my original response to the OP in that other thread stands: "Yes, it is true." :-(

Thanks all,

-- John D.

If your service ended in 1978 and you havent been able to work since then, the question becomes why havent you applied? Not nosey, just trying to help sort it out here on the board. Have you at least worked intermittently at a job that paid some social security? or health issues? or?

I too have been trying to get my quarters up to 20 in last few years before my body and brain go kaput. SSI isnt an option for me. I believe SSDI is correct, but I still have to qualify. I am not TDIU at teh VA yet, for you that may be a "help", though I'm not sure.Keep posting,cg

"As I said, I was turned down for SSDI when I applied for it a few years ago because they said I hadn't enough quarters the previous 10 years. So I didn't pursue it further. My last military service ended in 1978."

-- John D.

Edited by cloudcroft
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