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100% Disability & Work


david walker

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Depends on the disability-if IU definatley not. Otherwise yes but with considerations depending on the disability.

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WHATS THE NATURE OF THE DISIBILITY. IF HE IS IU I WOULD SAY NO AND IF IT IS A MENTAL CONDITION NO WAY.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

This question appears on this site every other week. Each time I have only one reply-WHY?WHY?WHY?

Why in the hell would I take a chance of losing over $4000 a month, tax free, for a chance to get back into the rat race & work again? Just me, but if you are 100% & can work are you really 100%?

Just venting,

Don

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This question appears on this site every other week. Each time I have only one reply-WHY?WHY?WHY?

Why in the hell would I take a chance of losing over $4000 a month, tax free, for a chance to get back into the rat race & work again? Just me, but if you are 100% & can work are you really 100%?

Just venting,

Don

I understand this point of view but don't share it. I didn't want out of the "rat race". I would love to do something. If someone is able to overcome their disability then I applaud them.

For certain, I don't recieve $4,000 a month at 100%. But even at $4000 I could make more when I was able to work. I had the opportunity to make much more. And enjoy what I was doing.

I wish I could do it, cause I would.

That's the short answer to "why".

Time

Edited by timetowinarace
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There is a 100% rating where one is unemployable and a schedular 100% where a person's disabilities add up to 100%. If a person is able to work, then what is the big deal? Nine times out of ten, a person that is 100% has a few serious disabilities that could potentially kill them. Why not applaud someone that is able to overcome their disabilities and work instead of assuming they shouldn't be 100%? I'm too tired of people complaining about the same ish every week........ Just my two cents........

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I understand this point of view but don't share it. I didn't want out of the "rat race". I would love to do something. If someone is able to overcome their disability then I applaud them.

For certain, I don't recieve $4,000 a month at 100%. But even at $4000 I could make more when I was able to work. I had the opportunity to make much more. And enjoy what I was doing.

I wish I could do it, cause I would.

That's the short answer to "why".

Time

I agree with you, Time. I was off work for a year for cancer and another year for back surgery and almost any thing is better than not being productive if you can be.

HM2 Doc John

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Guess my view is kind of one sided. I'm am 100% (70% PTSD, 30% TDIU) & 100% for Cancer. I understand the 100% unemployable and a 100% schedular process. In my case, I will do nothing that risks the VA taking the % away. I understand all the pros & cons, but I can't work, so guess it's a moot subject for me.

Take care,

Don

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I agree with everybody BUT why of all places Corrections? Been there done that and forget it, there is too much stress. On point had a vet go to work makeing 1,000 a week almost, great money!! Two months after he lost the VA award he fell off the equipment, hurt his back etc. and now is getting almost $200 a week workmans comp. So far VA is not very sympathetic in helping him regain his award. Is it worh it? Depends on your age the disability etc. If you are making it leave it alone. There is no way money will improve your health. :lol:

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Provided the 100% is not for a mental disorder or TDIU he can go back and work.

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Provided the 100% is not for a mental disorder or TDIU he can go back and work.

great example of a 100% veteran working former senator max cleland, but if you are being paid because you are unemployable then if you get employment you not unemployable.

if you are 100% for mental disorders including ptsd well it just won't add up for the va, if you are so mentally disabled as to be 100% it would not be possible to hold a job.

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Here are the regs-

http://72.14.205.104/custom?q=cache:NH78zl...326217334650925

The key is marginal employment.

Any vet getting a check at the 100% rate whether for TDIU or for 100%who also has an income-that is above marginal guidlines-

in my opinion-can possibly have their income checked by VA as matching their IRS or SSA payments to their compensation.

There was a topic here some time ago where a paid service officer received 100% VA comp yet was still able to work as a paid SO.

I dont know if he was legally able to work as an SO or not-

very possibly he was-I think his disabilities were all physical ones.

A TDIU vet is a vet has been declared as unemployable due to total service connection.

If a TDIU vet starts to make substantial wages-the VA will certainly find out.

The VA forms that we all file state that VA can access and share info with other fed departments such as SSA ,IRS etc.

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if you are 100% for mental disorders including ptsd well it just won't add up for the va, if you are so mentally disabled as to be 100% it would not be possible to hold a job.

I know I hold a minorty view on this and will only state it once here so as not to cause a fuss. I understand the thoughts about it but don't neccisarily agree. I also know the VA will take the majority view also.

That said, a physically disabled vet will endure a certain amount of hardship to overcome his/her disabilities to find a niche to work in. As such, should that vet not be penalized for doing so. If a mentally disabled vet can endure the same amount of hardship, in a different way, why should the vet be penalized for doing so?

As a mentally disabled vet, I find this discriminatory. I meet the requirements of the average person with my deficits for 100% schedualar. Because it is actuall brain damage it will never be repairable. The same for the physically disabled from some type of nerve damage.

I am allways hoping to come accross that niche that allows me to do something with the rest of my life. It is doubtfull that I ever will, but without that hope I may as well lay down and die. If I ever find it, I will take it. If I am discriminated against for doing so I will sue. I am no less a person than the physically disabled.

Enough said.

Time

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Agrees with Time. October is Disability Employment Awareness month. For some people, work and activity is a way of coping or dealing with lifes issues. I have too many freinds and family that I could use as examples, but a senior citizen who could stay depressed and alone in an apartment, finds volunteer work or a low paying job, thats part of living and dealing with issues, visible or not. Other individuals who have "mental health" issues result of substance abuse, alchoholl or drugs, auto accident TBI or a felony due to ADHD impulsiveness work all around, with and serve us daily, they just dont wear placards or tatoos! If one abides by the rules when it comes to disability compensation, some beneficial work or activity is fine and necessary! my nonmedical opinion,cg

October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month. This annual observance, designed to recognize the contributions of workers with disabilities, began in 1988 with the Presidential Proclamation of Public Law 100-630 (Title III, Sec 301a). This law replaced "National Employ the Handicapped Week," which had been celebrated annually since 1945 during the first week in October
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I am SC'd for MDD at 50%. It is extremely hard to maintain employment on a level that once was considered a "breeze". Being 100% P/T, not IU, I was able to work. But let me tell you that it did'nt last long, and I hated that because not only was it almost six figures that I was earning, it helped me cope with my mental issues. However, the Psy was right when she rated me in saying, "veteran will not be able to MAINTAIN gainful employment". I was out to prove her wrong because I wanted to WORK. Now I sit here because It eventually took its toll on me and I had to quit working because of my mental incapacity.

And as I am typing I have forgot what it is I am commenting on, go figure. Let me regroup and see why I was mad when I began typing this. Oh, probably time for my meds. Darnit. LOL, anyway I am with cowgirl, good luck!!

jmack

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JMACK

Please hang in there.

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Ex-Senator Bob Dole is 100% P&T. He was employed by the US Congress and Senate for a ton of years while 100% disabled and most recently was co-chairman of the Dole/Shalala committee making recommendations for the future of VA benefits. I doubt that even the most hardened VA employee questions the legality of him working while receiving VA compensation. Except for IU compensation and VA income-related pensions, the ability to be gainfully employed while concurrently considered by the VA to be 100% disabled is a non-issue.

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If you are 100% for a mental condition working is a big issue. If you are 100% for a mental condition and the VA finds out you are working you will be called in for a C&P exam. They will ask you if you are working. If you say yes, you will then get a rating decision a few months later telling you that you have been reduced to 30%. The main thing that kept me from getting a rating higher than 30% was the fact I worked full time at the post office. If you can maintain full employment then you probably are not 70-100% mentally disabled. It stands to reason although it may not be fair since they guys with physical injuries have an opportunity to have much better lives than a person who cannot get out of their chair for days due to depression.

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I was just asked to do an entire broadcast at SVR (Stardust Radio) on TDIU and 100% extraschedular-

It will be on Nov 14th at 6:30 PM EST.

The archives will be available and I will post a link to them at that time.

We need to discuss this issue because it can be a very confusing one.

The comp is the same but there is a big difference between TDIU and 100% extraschedular ratings.

I would think Max Clellan and Lewis Puller definitely could have received TDIU but maybe they got extraschedular-

or didnt even apply for VA comp at all.

Except for the fact that-Clellan Ran the VA as Secretary with catastrophic disability and Lewis Puller -also catastrophically disabled-(Chestys son) was a lawyer for VACO- VA Central Office) for many years.

They could not receive TDIU.They considered themselves employable and the VA sure did too.

Edited by Berta
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As hard as it is to get 100% in any form or matter from the VA it always surprises me how strongly Veterans still want to work. Maybe that is just part of our nature.

I am not sure but I think that the VA makes an exception on working for Veterans who are Service Officers cause I know a lot of them are Service Connected.

Anyway the more it is discussed the better cause if there is anything I hate is to see a Veteran have to deal with the VA on a reduction in their rating.

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