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  • 14 Questions about VA Disability Compensation Benefits Claims

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    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
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  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

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  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

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    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

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TopSecretWrapper

Hello From Texas

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I served during the tail end of Desert Storm and throughout Restore Hope. When I ended my tour of duty, I did not ask for any help with my medical condition. I got a DVT, and PSVT during service, but never did anything about it after the fact. It has been 12 years now, and my leg has continued to get worse, to the point of severe pain when walking and standing, so my husband told me to put away my pride, and ask the VA for help. I feel so stupid at times, because I did not want to burden my country with my medical woes, and I did not want to be a whiner, but, I guess I have to suck it up and reach out. Any suggestions on what to do now? I just recieved my VA-Form 21-526, and I am already confused. Is there a place I need to go to or call for help with this thing?

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Hello there and thank you for your service. Hadit is 'proactive' towards claims and there is no reason to er; 'suck up'. Okay, its taken me years to get past all that and it sounds like you are making a good start. Now, do you have a Veteran Service Officer? or have you been to a Veteran Service Center? thats a good way to start, by connecting up with other veterans as you have done here. What do you mean you just recieved your 21-526? Have you filled out the form?

My first thoughts are if maybe you havent already, read the FAQs here, request a copy of your service medical records (also known as SMRs) and do tell us if you applied for any other service conditions as of yet. It helps to know where to start, with what you have done so far, if that makes sense. best to ya, cg

I served during the tail end of Desert Storm and throughout Restore Hope. When I ended my tour of duty, I did not ask for any help with my medical condition. I got a DVT, and PSVT during service, but never did anything about it after the fact. It has been 12 years now, and my leg has continued to get worse, to the point of severe pain when walking and standing, so my husband told me to put away my pride, and ask the VA for help. I feel so stupid at times, because I did not want to burden my country with my medical woes, and I did not want to be a whiner, but, I guess I have to suck it up and reach out. Any suggestions on what to do now? I just recieved my VA-Form 21-526, and I am already confused. Is there a place I need to go to or call for help with this thing?

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Hi, thank you for the warm welcome. I am just now starting on all of this. I am sad to say, I have not contacted anyone except the Veterans administration, and the sent me a book and a packet to fill out. I just recieved it this week. I don't want to mess it up, from my understanding, that can make the process take much longer. I already know it will take about a year. What is a VOS? How do I get one? I have not filed for anything, EVER. This truly is my first attempt at getting VA help. Who do I contact to request a copy of your service medical records? Thank you so much.

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Have you read the first page and FAQs here at Hadit? Dont worry, you'll do fine, we are all veterans and family members. You may want to find a fellow veteran to ask about claims where you live, it differs. Now, a veteran service officer would be a Power of Attorny, someone like Disabled American Veterans, or VFW, American Legion, etc. We each here have had our experiences with thier 'service officers', ok or not ok. A service officer should act as a guide through the VA system. I have had three different VSO's (one at a time) and my current VSO is nice, I have alot more experience having worked my claim for several years, so namely my service officer 'double checks' my paperwork and shares information from the VA when action on my claim occurs.

So read, ask questions and again, welcome. cg

p.s. you said your disability is 5%? whats that for?

Hi, thank you for the warm welcome. I am just now starting on all of this. I am sad to say, I have not contacted anyone except the Veterans administration, and the sent me a book and a packet to fill out. I just recieved it this week. I don't want to mess it up, from my understanding, that can make the process take much longer. I already know it will take about a year. What is a VOS? How do I get one? I have not filed for anything, EVER. This truly is my first attempt at getting VA help. Who do I contact to request a copy of your service medical records? Thank you so much.
Edited by cowgirl

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re-5%, I had no idea until I started to read the board what that number was for, so I just put it down as a place holder, until I actually get all of this stuff done. Am I able to change it to UNKNOWN until I get through the process of finding it out?

In order to get a VSO, do I go to the VA hospital? I did not go overseas, therefore the only action I saw was the flightline, so VFW is out, I really don't know about any other services. I am truly ignorant of any of the services offered for me. I will read more, and hopefully get a good start. I did just find the place to get my Medical Records, so I am mailing that request in today. Any Idea how long it takes to recieve them?

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