Jump to content
  • veteranscrisisline-badge-chat-1.gif

  • Advertisemnt

  • Trouble Remembering? This helped me.

    I have memory problems and as some of you may know I highly recommend Evernote and have for years. Though I've found that writing helps me remember more. I ran across Tom's videos on youtube, I'm a bit geeky and I also use an IPad so if you take notes on your IPad or you are thinking of going paperless check it out. I'm really happy with it, I use it with a program called Noteshelf 2.

    Click here to purchase your digital journal. HadIt.com receives a commission on each purchase.

  • 14 Questions about VA Disability Compensation Benefits Claims

    questions-001@3x.png

    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
    Continue Reading
     
  • Ads

  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

    tinnitus-005.pngptsd-005.pnglumbosacral-005.pngscars-005.pnglimitation-flexion-knee-005.pngdiabetes-005.pnglimitation-motion-ankle-005.pngparalysis-005.pngdegenerative-arthitis-spine-005.pngtbi-traumatic-brain-injury-005.png

  • Advertisemnt

  • VA Watchdog

  • Advertisemnt

  • Ads

  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

    employment 2.jpeg

    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

Sign in to follow this  
Tbird

State-by-state Look At Vets' Benefits

Recommended Posts

State-by-state look at vets' benefits In addition to benefits offered by the The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, military veterans and their families may also qualify for a variety of other perks offered by every state and the District of Columbia.

Link to Article

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-0...ts-states_N.htm

LIAISONS: Vets miss out on benefits, liaisons say

By Judy Keen, USA TODAY

CHICAGO — Many veterans never receive the federal and state benefits to which they're entitled because they're unaware they qualify for health care, tax breaks and other compensation, local liaisons to former troops say. "They're entitled to these benefits. They just don't know they exist," says veterans service officer Darlene McMartin, who works in a county-funded office in Council Bluffs, Iowa. McMartin says she encounters veterans every day who don't know about her office and the services they provide.

There are 25 million veterans, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs says. In fiscal year 2006, it provided disability pay to 2.6 million of them, pensions to 320,000, education benefits to 500,000, guaranteed home loans to 180,000 and health care to 5.5 million. It provided insurance to 4.5 million veterans and active-duty personnel.

The VA gives briefings and booklets about benefits to military personnel before they are discharged and sends each a "welcome home" packet with reminders and toll-free numbers. Still, veterans often don't know they can get financial or medical help or increases in disability pay, says Jim Golgart, a veterans service officer in Le Center, Minn.

"A lot of veterans from all eras do not understand or know about their benefits," says John Scocos, secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs. He wishes the federal VA would give outreach grants to state agencies.

Thirty states have county veterans service officers to provide information and help fill out applications; the rest have state or regional officers. Those advocates say reaching veterans is difficult:

•Many men and women who leave military service "put the green suit away and that's it," says Jim Lynch, veterans service officer in Valparaiso, Ind. Decades later, many develop health issues "and wonder what help they're entitled to." Long gaps can make it difficult to find records documenting injuries and illnesses during their service, he says.

•Ray Carroll, service officer in Panama City, Fla., says there are at least 22,000 veterans in Bay County. In 2007, his office saw 5,353 of them, including 441 new clients. Many more could qualify for benefits, he says. He runs ads in local media and holds an open house every Tuesday at a fire station.

•American Legion Post 266 in Tea, S.D., held its annual benefits forum Monday. "We're getting to some of the people … but not all," says district commander Richard Sievert.

•Mike Beaird, service officer in Huntsville, Ala., hosted a "supermarket of benefits" at a shopping mall last month. Many widows of veterans of earlier wars never seek help, he says.

•In Fall River, Mass., Nagali Bouchard of the Veterans' Association of Bristol County says most of the 15 new clients she sees each month have never sought medical care through the VA. "Sometimes," she says, "I guess they just fall through the cracks."

Legislation pending in the Senate would create a separate budget for VA outreach. The House of Representatives has passed a similar bill. "VA is conducting a very active outreach effort to recently returning veterans," says federal VA spokesman Matt Smith.

ALABAMA: Free tuition at state colleges and technical schools for disabled veterans and dependents.

ALASKA: One-time 25% discounts for some veterans on the purchase of residential or recreational land.

ARIZONA: Exemptions from vehicle license taxes and registration fees for fully disabled veterans and surviving spouses.

ARKANSAS: Income tax exemption of the first $6,000 of service or retirement pay.

CALIFORNIA: Home loans below market interest rates with low or no down payments.

COLORADO: Free hunting and fishing licenses for fully disabled veterans.

CONNECTICUT: $1,500 property-tax exemptions for wartime veterans.

DELAWARE: High-school diplomas for World War II veterans who didn't graduate because of military service.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA: Assistance applying for federal benefits.

FLORIDA: Homestead tax exemptions for veterans with service-connected permanent and total disabilities.

GEORGIA: Free driver's licenses for some veterans.

HAWAII: Payments of up to $5,000 to totally disabled veterans to help buy or remodel homes to improve handicapped accessibility.

IDAHO: Advocates to help seek federal benefits.

ILLINOIS: Each county grants one four-year scholarship annually for free tuition at the University of Illinois to veterans' children.

INDIANA: Emergency grants for families of National Guard and reservists for food, housing, utilities, medical services or transportation.

IOWA: Grants up to $10,000 to help family members be with injured veterans during recovery and rehabilitation.

KANSAS: Helps veterans prepare for, find and keep jobs.

KENTUCKY: Tuition waivers at state schools for children and spouses of disabled or deceased veterans.

LOUISIANA: Employment preferences in civil service jobs and layoffs.

MAINE: State guarantees for a percentage of small-business loans.

MARYLAND: Exemptions from 5% excise tax on the sale or transfer of boats by active-duty military.

MASSACHUSETTS: $2,000 annuities to some veterans and their spouses as well as Gold Star Parents.

MICHIGAN: Annual tuition grants of up to $2,800 for eligible children of some deceased or permanently disabled veterans.

MINNESOTA: Cash assistance for rent, mortgages, utilities for veterans unable to work because of temporary disabilities.

MISSISSIPPI: Professional licenses don't expire while military personnel are on active duty or for 90 days afterward.

MISSOURI: State tax exemptions for payments from the Agent Orange compensation fund to veterans or dependents.

MONTANA: $250 death payments made by counties.

NEBRASKA: Temporary emergency aid for food, fuel, shelter, clothing, funeral and medical costs for veterans, spouses and dependents.

NEVADA: Free hunting and fishing licenses for disabled veterans.

NEW HAMPSHIRE: $100 bonuses for discharged or deceased veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan after 9/11.

NEW JERSEY: Readjustment counseling for veterans and their famiilies.

NEW MEXICO: $4,000 reduction in the taxable value of real estate.

NEW YORK: Burial allowance of up to $6,000 for some military personnel killed in combat or while on active duty in hostile locations since Sept. 29, 2003.

NORTH CAROLINA: Income-tax exemptions for federal grants for veterans who are blind or lost the use of limbs.

NORTH DAKOTA: Loans of up to $5,000 for temporary financial emergencies. Half the interest is refunded if the loan is repaid on time.

OHIO: Free legal help for military personnel and their families.

OKLAHOMA: Exemption from sales, excise and some other taxes for totally disabled veterans.

OREGON: No loan fees on home improvement loans.

PENNSYLVANIA: $150 monthly pensions for totally disabled veterans who are paralyzed or blind.

RHODE ISLAND: Free license plates for former prisoners of war.

SOUTH CAROLINA: Exemption from parking meter fees when a veteran's vehicle has disabled veteran, Purple Heart or Medal of Honor license plates.

SOUTH DAKOTA: $40 toward the cost of installing a government headstone or marker at veterans' graves.

TENNESSEE: Free license plates for veterans with total service-connected disabilities.

TEXAS: Credit in state retirement system for active-duty military time.

UTAH: Discounted mass-transit fares for disabled and elderly veterans.

VERMONT: A "war bonus" of up to $120 for Vietnam veterans.

VIRGINIA: Job referral and placement assistance.

WASHINGTON: Estate-management services for veterans and family members who can't manage their finances.

WEST VIRGINIA: Tuition assistance to veterans who need new vocations and have exhausted the G.I. Bill.

WISCONSIN: Job training, counseling and alcohol and drug abuse treatment for homeless veterans and those at risk of becoming homeless.

WYOMING: Free tuition and fees for education to spouses and children of veterans whose deaths were service-connected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

State-by-state look at vets' benefits In addition to benefits offered by the The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, military veterans and their families may also qualify for a variety of other perks offered by every state and the District of Columbia.

Link to Article

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2008-0...ts-states_N.htm

This is a good list but it's incomplete. I live in California and know for a fact there are more veterans' State benefits available than this article proclaims. You have to go to the State's Laws and do the homework. ~Wings

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Ads

  • Our picks

    • Independent Medical Opinions by Your Private Physician

      If you spend any time reading VA case law you’ll come across the phrase less likely, more likely than not and so on. In the VA Clinicians Guide for Disability Examination it lays out how these are weighted.
      • 0 replies
    • Yes 

      After a PTSD/Unspecific MDD Diagnose From the VA Dr's

      The gold standard for diagnosing PTSD is a structured clinical interview such as the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS-5). When necessary, the PCL-5 can be scored to provide a provisional PTSD DSM 5 diagnosis.

      Any clinical clinician such as MD ,Psychiatrist even a L.C.S.W. (Certified)can perform the Diagnostics Evaluation Employed by the the VA

      ...They just need to figure out your symptoms and put together a list of your symptom's that you possess or show from the evaluation...I am not 100% Sure just how they do this ?

      being I am not a Dr or clinical clinician 

      Once a Diagnoses of PTSD is given they try to set you up with a Therapist to help with your New dx And how to adjust or cope with the Anxiety and Depression the PTSD can cause.

        you learn the tools to cope with and depending how severe your symptoms are ? 

       They test /screen you with phychoeducational type therapy treatment usually at first.

       Warning  some of this therapy can be very rough on a Veteran  from holding on to guilt  from the trauma its self or you maybe in a  ''stuck point''from memories and guilt or from the stressor's or anything that reminds you of the trauma you endured.

      The therapy works  even if we think it don't,  I recommend Therapy for all PTSD Veterans  it could very well save your life once the correct therapy is in place and the Veteran makes all his Clinical Appointments.

      I still have Combat PTSD it probably will never be cured completely but we can learn the tools it takes to cope with this horrible diseases 

      even learning breathing techniques  Helps tremendously during a panic attact.

      I have guilt from the war in Vietnam  ( I ask my self what could I have done to make a better outcome/difference?..and also I am in what the therapist calls stuck points. working on that at present once a week for 90 minutes.  I am very fortunate to have the help the VA gives me and I am lucky I have not turned to alcohol or drugs to mask my problem.

      But I have put my family through a living hell with my angers of burst.and they all stood by me the whole time years and years of my family life was disrupted because of me and my children &spouse  never deserved it one bit.

      That's all I want to say about that.

      At least I am still around. and plan to be tell my old age dying day.
    • No timeframe gotta love that answer it’s even better when you ask 1800 people or call the board directly they’ll say you’ll know sooner then later. I had mine advanced and it was about 2 months later until I had the decision in my hand which seems forever but in the present system in 2016 lightning fast...
        • Thanks
    • I am serviced connected for ankylosing spondylitis back in 1985. I had a C&P exam on 7-7-19 since I am asking for an increase in my cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral ratings. After speaking with the DAV to find out progress and info on my exam, the Rep. noted sort of what I expected. Radiculopathy was noted and ROM was 0-15 for cervical, and 0-25 for back. I am currently rated as Cervical 30%, Thoracic 10%, and Lumbosacral 40%. The main question that I have is relating to the thoracic 10% and lumbosacral 40%. I am confused on these two. Is Lumbosacral separate from the thoracic/others ? Since my back ROM is at 0-25, does this mean that my thoracic might increase from the 10% to a higher rating ? I am confused how they break down my ratings from cervical at 30%, Thoracic at 10%, and Lumbosacral at 40%. Also, with the radiculopathy, is this something that they will rate also ? I am currently at 90% total combined for all my disabilities. I hope this helps for someone to give me advice/answers.
      • 4 replies
    • Thank you @GeekySquid for your reply. 

       

      I have redacted personal information for my documents listed below. 

      I look forward to your reply. 

      HEADACHE STR 2006 copy_Redacted.pdf

      HEADACHE-DBQ.pdf

      Pages from Original Denial-Grant Reasons_Redacted.pdf
  • Ads

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ad

  • Latest News
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

{terms] and Guidelines