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Personality Disorder Dd214 & The Border Patrol


Air Force Loco
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Dear friends.

I crossed paths with a leutant and he didnt like it so he took me to the psych in panama canal. "Gorgas" ended up with 3 different diagnosis. I hired a Air Force lawyer and he mentioned my concerns about these claims. The leutanant was furius and went to the top and recieve permission by the base commander with a signiture to discharge me. The discharge came about as honorable but not under general but with a personality disorder. Will this slim down my chances to not making it in as a border patrol agent?

Really need an answer. I assume no but I would like to hear each persons true stories.

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Dear friends.

I crossed paths with a leutant and he didnt like it so he took me to the psych in panama canal. "Gorgas" ended up with 3 different diagnosis. I hired a Air Force lawyer and he mentioned my concerns about these claims. The leutanant was furius and went to the top and recieve permission by the base commander with a signiture to discharge me. The discharge came about as honorable but not under general but with a personality disorder. Will this slim down my chances to not making it in as a border patrol agent?

Really need an answer. I assume no but I would like to hear each persons true stories.

I can not answer for your particular case, it may depend on what the other mentioned diagnosis's were. Have you had a IMO on the outside concerning your PD diagnosis? You may only learn the answer if you make your application, law inforcement have psych evaluations as part of their application process, at least those I am acquainted with. Job history since getting out and recommendations from past employers or prominent people in the community, will help considerably.

Personaly, I don't think a PD is a bar from a job in Law Enforcement, but if you had brig time while in-service, they may consider the circomstances that got you put in the brig. Just because the service found you unsuitabe for further service doesn't mean you are not suited for a civilain job, even one in law inforcement.

You won't know for sure until you try, if you don't get in, then it would well be for other reasons. If you don't get in, try to find out why, you may have other discrepancies that you could improve on for next time, if you are really serious in becoming a Border Patrol Officer.

Like I said, go ahead an try it, you'll never know for sure unless you do. Everyones PD is in someways different from others and more severe and/or debilitating than others.

a.k.a. Jim B)

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Air Force,

Welcome.

You would more likely than not need to locate and study the

requirements to become a Border Patrol Agent.

We don't really have Border Partol Agent Information here.

carlie

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Did you have other discipline problems to justify a PD discharge? Usually, the vet had gotten into some kind of trouble and then because the military is looking to avoid the expense of court martial more discipline they offer a discharge. I don't think I ever heard of a person being discharge just because someone says they have a PD, unless their is a deficiency in work or discipline problem or the person is obviously mentally ill and the military wants to avoid paying a medical pension.

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Did you have other discipline problems to justify a PD discharge? Usually, the vet had gotten into some kind of trouble and then because the military is looking to avoid the expense of court martial more discipline they offer a discharge. I don't think I ever heard of a person being discharge just because someone says they have a PD, unless their is a deficiency in work or discipline problem or the person is obviously mentally ill and the military wants to avoid paying a medical pension.

Re: "Usually, the vet had gotten into some kind of trouble and then because the military is looking to avoid the expense of court martial more discipline they offer a discharge."

I don't know what the circumstances were for the vet who started this thread, but the comment you posted above is 100 percent accurate. Three soldiers from my battalion were put out under these circumstances during Desert Storm. They were lucky they weren't tried by court martial.

On the other hand, I was never asked for my DD 214 after I left the Army; I wonder if that is a job requirement in this case...

Ron

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BORDER PATROL AGENT


Must be a U.S. citizen. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) also has requirements that apply to all applicants other than current CBP employees. If you are not a current CBP employee, CBP requires that for the three (3) years prior to filing an application for employment, individuals must meet one or more of the following criteria:

Applicant resided in the United States or its protectorates or territories (short trips abroad, such as vacations, will not necessarily disqualify an applicant.)
Applicant worked for the U.S. government as an employee overseas in a federal or military capacity.
Applicant was a dependent of a U.S. federal or military employee serving overseas.
Must possess a valid state driver’s license at the time of appointment.
Must be under age 40 to register for the written test. This position is covered under law enforcement retirement provisions. Therefore, candidates must be referred for selection prior to their 40th birthday unless they presently serve or have previously served in a position covered by federal civilian law enforcement retirement.
Pre-employment Requirements consist of a thorough background investigation, medical examination, fitness test, and drug test. If your background includes past or present arrests, convictions, dismissals from previous jobs, debts and financial issues, excessive use of alcohol, use of illegal drugs, and/or the sale and distribution of illegal drugs, you may not pass the pre-employment requirements for this position. You may also be subject to a polygraph examination.
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What is your SPN code on the old DD214.

That is the one that they will look at.

J

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