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Marijuana Legal For Medicinal Purposes


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:unsure: I use it and it works great. I dont know what will happen next time I piss for the VA if I do, but I have had two positives already for thc.Once when admitted to pysch ward and once in a ER room visit. NOTE DONT GO TO VA ER IF YOU WILL P DIRTY !!! No buddy never said crap to me about it, none of the docs or anyone? Funny thing is that in Ann Arbor where the VAMC is Marijuana is legal for medicinal purposes with a note from a medical professional which I have (VA doesnt know I have it). And I get my narcs every month. I think there will be a big conflict with my case in the future but if I could grow my own quality smoke and use it by consumption even though it doesn't cause cancer (read on my friends it fights cancer)I can quit the NARCS the herb works so much better and for you skepticals read below and check it out b4 you jump to any conclusions

US Government Holds Patent For Medical Marijuana, Shows Hypocrisy

On the one hand, United States federal government officials have consistently denied that marijuana has any medical benefits. On the other, the government actually holds patents for the medical use of the plant. Just check out US Patent 6630507 titled "Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants" which is assigned to The United States of America, as represented by the Department of Health and Human Services. The patent was obtained in October of 2003. Read the rest of the article

Marijuana and Lung Cancer: Another Marijuana Myth Goes Up in Smoke

by Paul Armentano ________________________________________

Epidemiological data presented last May at the International Conference of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) concluding that smoking marijuana, even long-term, is not positively associated with increased incidence of lung-cancer, is just the latest in a long line of government claims regarding the alleged dangers of pot to go - pardon the pun - up in smoke. Investigators from the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California assessed the possible association between cannabis use and the risk of lung cancer in middle-aged adults (ages 18-59) living in Los Angeles. Three Links to substaniate this: FOX NEWS Medical Website Antineoplastic activity of cannabinoids A.E. Munson, L.S. Harris, M.A. Friedman, W.L. Dewey, and R.A. Carchman Journal of the National Cancer Institute,

Study fails to find link between marijuana use and cancer

By Karl Leif Bates News Service http://www.ur.umich.edu/0607/Oct16_06/01.shtml

Although marijuana smoke is known to contain carcinogenic agents, and many studies in humans, animals and cell cultures have indicated that marijuana smoking may predispose a person to cancer, a large epidemiologic study of cancer patients and cancer-free controls in Los Angeles has found no clear association between pot-smoking and cancer.

New Data Find No Lung Cancer Link for Marijuana

http://www.oncology-times.com Oncology Times:Volume 28(12)25 June 2006p 30-31

[AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING] Fuerst, Mark L. Large Population-Based Case-Control Study SAN DIEGO-Despite previous evidence suggesting that smoking marijuana predisposes users to lung cancer, a new large, population-based, case-control study shows no such association even among long-term, heavy users. The rest of the story: Word, or Text Documents.

Cannabis Eases Post Traumatic Stress

By Tod Mikuriya, MD (HIS BIO)

Originally published in O'Shaughnessy's, Spring 2006

William Woodward, MD, of the American Medical Association, testifying before Congress in 1937 against the Prohibition of cannabis, paraphrased a French author (F. Pascal, 1934) to the effect that "Indian hemp has remarkable properties in revealing the subconscious." A Congressman asked, "Are there any substitutes for that latter psychological use?" Woodward replied, "I know of none. That use, by the way, was recognized by John Stuart Mill in his work on psychology, where he referred to the ability of Cannabis or Indian hemp to revive old memories -and psychoanalysis depends on revivivification of hidden memories." The rest of the story Word document or text document

Depression/Mental Illness

The use of cannabis by people with mental illness has historically been associated with claims of both benefits and harms (1, 2). In its recent review, the Institute of Medicine (3) observed (p. 106), 'people with schizophrenia or with a family history of schizophrenia are likely to be at greater risk for adverse psychiatric effects from the use of cannabinoids,' and 'there is little evidence that marijuana alone produces a psychosis that persists after the period of intoxication.' In modern times, the suggestion that recreational cannabis use may be a risk factor for schizophrenia was first raised by Andreasson and collegeagues (4). Many of the other studies exploring this apparent association consist of retrospective analyses often relying on unreliable measures such as self-report, and are unable to distinguish association from causation. (5)(6)(7)(8). A recent retrospective and prospective examination of 232 newly diagnosed schizophrenic patients demonstrated no temporal correlation between substance abuse onset and that of psychosis (6). A recent review (7) concluded that cannabis may precipitate psychosis in vulnerable patients, increase relapse rates or produce dependency in those already affected. Similarly, in Italy (8), data supported a duality of experience such that some schizophrenics employ cannabis as self-treatment while in others it might be one factor predisposing to the disorder. It is noteworthy that endocan-nabinoid levels are elevated in the brains of schizophrenics (9), although the practical significance of this finding is not yet clear. The cannabis component cannabidiol may possess anti-psychotic activity The cannabis component cannabidiol may possess anti-psychotic activity (10), and a single case report was consistent with this (11). Benefits were noted in depression measures in cancer patients treated with THC (12), and this has been supported by anecdotal reports (13). Both cannabidiol and nabilone (THC analogue) have demonstrated apparent benefit in clinical and experimental anxiety (10, 14, 15, 16). Anecdotal reports suggest that cannabis may alleviate symptoms of bipolar disease (17). The recent discovery that endocan-nabinoids regulate extinction of aversive memories (18) has led some to suggest the use of phytocannabinoids in treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

References 1. Russo EB. Handbook of psychotropic herbs: A scientific analysis of herbal remedies for psychiatric conditions. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press; 2001. 2. Grinspoon L, Bakalar JB. Marihuana, the forbidden medicine. Rev. and exp. ed. New Haven: Yale University Press; 1997. 3. Joy JE, Watson SJ, Benson JA, Jr. Marijuana and medicine: Assessing the science base. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine; 1999. 4. Andreasson S, Allebeck P, Engstrom A, Rydberg U (1987). Cannabis and schizophrenia: a longitudinal study of Swedish conscripts. Lancet, ii, 1483 -86 5. Johns A. Psychiatric effects of cannabis. Br J Psychiatry 2001;178:116-22. 6. Buhler B, Hambrecht M, Loffler W, an der Heiden W, Hafner H. Precipitation and determination of the onset and course of schizophrenia by substance abuse-a retrospective and prospective study of 232 population-based first illness episodes. Schizophr Res 2002;54(3):243-51. 7. Degenhardt L, Hall W. Cannabis and psychosis. Curr Psychiatry Rep 2002; 4(3):191-6. 8. Bersani G, Orlandi V, Kotzalidis GD, Pancheri P. Cannabis and schizophrenia: impact on onset, course, psychopathology and outcomes. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 2002;252(2):86-92. 9. Leweke FM, Giuffrida A, Wurster U, Emrich HM, Piomelli D. Elevated endogenous cannabinoids in schizophrenia. Neuroreport 1999;10(8):1665-9. 10. Zuardi AW, Guimaraes FS. Cannabidiol as an anxiolytic and antipsychotic. In: Mathre ML, editor. Cannabis in medical practice: a legal, historical and pharmacological overview of the therapeutic use of marijuana. Jefferson, NC: McFarland; 1997. p. 133-141. 11. Zuardi AW, Morais SL, Guimaraes FS, Mechoulam R. Antipsychotic effect of cannabidiol. J Clin Psychiatry 1995; 56(10):485-6. 12. Regelson W, Butler JR, Schulz J, Kirk T, Peek L, Green ML, et al. Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol as an effective antidepressant and appetite- stimulating agent in advanced cancer patients. In: In: Braude MC, Szara S, ed. Pharmacology of marihuana. Vol 2. New York, Raven Press,; 1976. p. 763-776. 13. Russo EB, Mathre ML, Byrne A, Velin R, Bach PJ, Sanchez-Ramos J, et al. Chronic cannabis use in the Compassionate Investigational New Drug Program: An examination of benefits and adverse effects of legal clinical cannabis. Journal of Cannabis Therapeutics 2002;2(1):3-57. 14. Zuardi AW, Cosme RA, Graeff FG, Guimaraes FS. Effects of ipsapirone and cannabidiol on human experimental anxiety. Journal of Psychopharmacology 1993; 7(1):82-88. 15. Fabre LF, McLendon D (1981). The efficacy and safety of nabilone (a synthetic cannabinoid) in the treatment of anxiety. J Clin Pharm, 21, 377S-382S 16. Ilaria RL, Thornby JI, Fann WE (1981). Nabilone, a cannabinol derivative, in the treatment of anxiety neurosis. Current Therapeutic Research, 29, 943-917. Grinspoon L, Bakalar JB. The use of cannabis as a mood stabilizer in bipolar disorder: anecdotal evidence and the need for clinical research. J Psychoactive Drugs 1998;30(2):171-7. 18. Marsicano G, Wotjak CT, Azad SC, Bisogno T, Rammes G, Cascio MG, et al. The endogenous cannabinoid system controls extinction of aversive memories. Nature 2002;418(6897):530-4.

Pain

The analgesic or pain reducing properties of cannabis have been known for at least 4000 years, from the time of the Ancient Assyrians (1). The modern era of scientific study of cannabinoids and pain began in 1974 with the studies of Noyes et al. (2-4), in which it was noted that numerous types of pain were treatable with cannabis or THC, and that the latter produced analgesia equivalent to codeine in one small clinical trial. The historical and scientific aspects of cannabis and cannabinoids in pain management have been thoroughly reviewed (5, 6). Key areas of cannabis therapeutics revolve around its roles in neuropathic pain (7, 8), as an anti-inflammatory agent, and usage in musculoskeletal pain. THC is the main contributor of cannabis to control of pain, via its actions on the central nervous system cannabinoid receptors One of the primary functions of the endogenous cannabinoid system is modulation of pain control, in parallel with the endogenous opioid and vanilloid systems. THC is the main contributor of cannabis to control of pain, via its actions on CB1, the central nervous system cannabinoid receptors that occur in key pain-modulating areas of the spinal cord, and brainstem. Although a review of the analgesic effects of cannabinoids concluded that they have little demonstrated benefit to date (9), the controlled clinical studies available for analysis were few and most had design flaws. This review was itself the subject of a critical response (10, 11). The potential of various cannabis extracts in both nociceptive and neuropathic pain are currently being explored in several centres. Initial results are encouraging, including reduction of pain in MS patients in two studies (12, 13; see MS section of this article) and intractable pain unresponsive to standard treatment in 34 patients (14). Interim results have been presented at the The Pain Society Annual Scientific Meeting 2003 on THC and THC:CBD in brachial plexus avulsion, a condition that often follows traction injuries and that frequently produces a highly characteristic pain syndrome (15). Both CBME extracts decreased pain and improved sleep. Interim data was also presented at the 19th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (16). Significant mean reductions favouring CBME were found in both the primary outcome of pain and sleep disturbance, and patients treated with CBME were more likely to feel "much" or "very much improved" than those receiving placebo.

References 1. Thompson RC. A dictionary of Assyrian botany. London: British Academy; 1949. 2. Noyes R, Jr., Baram DA. Cannabis analgesia. Compr Psychiatry 1974;15(6):531-5. 3. Noyes R, Jr., Brunk SF, Baram DA, Canter A. Analgesic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. J Clin Pharmacol 1975;15(2-3):139-43. 4. Noyes R, Jr., Brunk SF, Avery DAH, Canter AC. The analgesic properties of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and codeine. Clin Pharmacol Ther 1975;18(1):84-9. 5. Russo EB. Role of cannabis and cannabinoids in pain management. In: Weiner RS, editor. Pain management: A practical guide for clinicians. 6th ed. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 2002. p. 357-375. http://www.montananorml.org/docs/Russo-AAPM_chapter.pdf 6. Pertwee RG. Cannabinoid receptors and pain. Prog Neuro-biol 2001;63(5): 569-611. 7. Russo EB. Hemp for headache: An in-depth historical and scientific review of cannabis in migraine treatment. Journal of Cannabis Therapeutics 2001;1(2):21-92. http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/hh.pdf 8. Russo EB. Clinical endocannabinoid deficiency (CECD): Can this concept explain therapeutic benefits of cannabis in migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and other treatment-resistant conditions? Neuroendocrinol Lett 2004;(in press). 9. Campbell FA, Tramber MR, Carroll D, Reynolds DJM, Moore RA, McQuay HJ. Are cannabinoids an effective and safe option in the management of pain? A qualitative systematic review. British Medical Journal 2001;323(7 July):1-6. 10. Russo E. Cannabinoids in pain management. Study was bound to conclude that cannabinoids had limited efficacy. BMJ 2001;323(7323):1249-50; discussion 1250-1. 11. Baker D, Pryce G, Giovannoni G, Thompson AJ. The therapeutic potential of cannabis. Lancet Neurology 2003;2(May):291-298. 12. Zajicek J, Fox P, Sanders H, Wright D, Vickery J, Nunn A, et al. Cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity and other symptoms related to multiple sclerosis (CAMS study): multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial. Lancet 2003;362(9395):1517-26. 13. Wade DT, Robson P, House H, Makela P, Aram J. A preliminary controlled study to determine whether whole-plant cannabis extracts can improve intractable neurogenic symptoms. Clinical Rehabilitation 2003;17:18-26. 14. Notcutt W, Price M, Sansom C, Simmons S, Phillips C. Medicinal cannabis extract in chronic pain: Overall results of 29 "N of 1" studies (CBME-1). In: Symposium on the Cannabinoids; 2002 July 13; Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, CA: International Cannabinoid Research Society; 2002. p. 55. 15. The Pain Society Annual Scientific Meeting 2003, Glasgow Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre: 1- 4 April 16. 19th Congress of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis Sept.17-20, 2003, Milan

Which Conditions are Treatable With Cannabis

The historic medical marijuana initiative passed by California voters in 1996 authorizes physicians to approve the use of cannabis "in the treatment of cancer, anorexia, AIDS, chronic pain, spasticity, glaucoma, arthritis, migraine, or any other illness for which marijuana provides relief." Californians's implicit understanding that cannabis is a remarkably versatile medicine has been confirmed in recent years by researchers throughout the world. GW Pharmaceuticals, the British company that is developing cannabis-plant extracts to be marketed by Bayer, identifies the following conditions as likely targets for its products. The rest of the story:word doc or text doc

crap the links dont work, I will put this info up on my website and then provide a link back in this thread.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

I have always said if the big Pharma co could patent this it would have been leagle a very very long time ago.......its mother nature's alternative to presription drugs in a much broader context.

I will not attest that it fights cancer but it is medicaly proven to reduce the bad and unbearable effects that treatment causes, and the effects of cancer and many other diseases.

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My vote is for legalization - keeps nausea down and appetite up !

I'd much rather that if someone chooses to drive impaired that they

smoke a joint instead of drink alcohol.

jmho,

carlie

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I have always said if the big Pharma co could patent this it would have been leagle a very very long time ago.......its mother nature's alternative to presription drugs in a much broader context.

I will not attest that it fights cancer but it is medicaly proven to reduce the bad and unbearable effects that treatment causes, and the effects of cancer and many other diseases.

I have read that they think thc effects the blood supply to the cancer it wont let it grow, I think its amazing and let me make it clear up to 9 months ago that I smoked cigarettes for 31 years, and I know cigarettes cause cancer. My lungs are clean, due to me having a claim in for asbestosis a year ago I had high resolution CT scans of my lungs and I am LUCKY. But I have to wonder could using mj for the last 4 years have killed anything I may have had, we will never know. But AGAIN why does the US DEPT OF HEALTH have a patent on it as a ANTIOXIDANT...............

When I moved to MI in late 03 I lost my doctor from out of state and thus lost my monthly Oxycontin and tylox scripts. So I pretty much happen to drop that cold turkey after a few years on it, and it just so happens that at the same time I was passing the biggest kidney stone of my life and I had mj friend get me some mj, and I never looked back. The pain in my neck is so severe that I use the mj along with a fentanyl patch and 5mg pure oxycodone as many as 6 per day as needed. If I can be allowed to grow my own I can quit those drugs again, and I think thats much better for me. I also intend to eat this no smoke it.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

BETRAYED

When it comes to pain you treat it in the manner that is best for you, it is your pain.

When I left the service I was a mess and the VA made it worse by sending me bags full of the good stuff. One day I was going to work and stopped to get my mail , I woke up a few seconds later confused, I reached into the mail box to find another VA goddie bag, so there I was on the side of the road wondering what happened with the goodie bag in my hand, I turned around went home and threw it away along with everything else besides my stomach meds.......my life has been much better.

I have good days and bad days just as before but at least I am here,I am so glad I stopped at the box that day as I know if I continued I could have killed someone or myself if this would have happend while driving.

My father is going through Chemo now, and I am going to talk to him about this, but as a former cop it will not be easy but my mom can make some mean brownies.

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This thread is over 365 days old and has been closed.

Please post your question as a New Topic by clicking this link and choosing which forum to post in.

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Remember, everyone who comes here is a volunteer. At one point, they went to the forums looking for information. They liked it here and decided to stay and help other veterans. They share their personal experience, providing links to the law and reference materials and support because working on your claim can be exhausting and beyond frustrating. 

 

This thread may still provide value to you and is worth at least skimming through the responses to see if any of them answer your question. Knowledge Is Power, and there is a lot of knowledge in older threads.

 

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