Jump to content
Using an Ad Blocker? Consider adding HadIt.com as an exception. Hadit.com is funded through advertising, ad free memberships, contributions and out of pocket. ×
  • 0

Do I Need Conformation By Neurologist?


Rockhound
This thread is over 365 days old and has been closed.

Please post your question as a New Topic by clicking this link and choosing which forum to post in.

For almost everything you are going to want to post in VA Claims Research.

If this is your first time posting. Take a moment and read our Guidelines. It will inform you of what is and isn't acceptable and tips on getting your questions answered. 

 

Remember, everyone who comes here is a volunteer. At one point, they went to the forums looking for information. They liked it here and decided to stay and help other veterans. They share their personal experience, providing links to the law and reference materials and support because working on your claim can be exhausting and beyond frustrating. 

 

This thread may still provide value to you and is worth at least skimming through the responses to see if any of them answer your question. Knowledge Is Power, and there is a lot of knowledge in older threads.

 

spacer.png

Question

Below is a couple of excerps from the Summery & Recommendations of a Neuropsychiatric test I took and wonder if I need conformation from a Neurologist that their is brain damage consistant with these test results? That is, his findings are consistant with the test results and that the TBI I sustained while in the service is more likely than not or as likely as not the cause for my current problems listed in the stated excerps

1. "Mr. XXXX 's attention and memory abilities are basically intact. Test scores show significant executive dysfunction.

2. "Given the course of history, it is possible that the deficits found represent the sequaelae of the brain injury he sustained during the military service. Changes in mood and personality functioning may represent an Organic Personality Disorder stemming from the brain injury. Military records show that his performance prior to the injury was satisfactory.

Also, would I need I a, "as likely as not" or better statement from this neurologist, that the Personality disorder, inadequate type, that was used to deny my original claim for a psychiatric disorder were one and the same and had no relationship to the psychiatric disorder, since it developt from the TBI as a organic personality disorder, and not as the VA Examiner opinioned it to be nor how the VA Rater later used it as his basis to deny my original claim?

I'm just trying to get input so I can reopen my claim so that I can, first get my TBI SC and then possibly later, get my psychological problems from service also SC.

Rockhound Rider :P

p.s. sorry for the spelling errors. LoL :P

Edited by Rockhound
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Answers 4
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters For This Question

Top Posters For This Question

4 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • HadIt.com Elder

Below are excerpts from the Summary & Recommendations of a Neuropsychiatric test. I wonder if I need conformation from a Neurologist that there is brain damage consistant with these test results? That is, his findings are consistant with the test results, and that the TBI I sustained while in the service is more likely than not or as likely as not the cause for my current problems listed in the stated excerpts . . .

PART I

1. "Mr. XXXX 's attention and memory abilities are basically intact. Test scores show significant executive dysfunction. Defined as cognative deficits.

2. "Given the course of history, it is possible that the deficits found represent the sequaelae of the brain injury he sustained during the military service. Changes in mood and personality functioning may represent an Organic Personality Disorder stemming from the brain injury. Military records show that his performance prior to the injury was satisfactory.

PART II

As likely as not, Organic Personality Disorder (cite DSM diagnosis) developed as a consequence of in-service traumatic brain injury, and does not represent Personality Disorder as defined by CFR ____.

Comments:

PART I. On it's face, the Summary is good evidence in support of claim. The weight of evidence would increase with an "as likely as not" standard, for VA purposes.

PART II. I re-wrote for conciseness. A statement similar to this effect by a Neurologist would probably seal the deal. ~Wings

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

x

x

x

Axis I and II Psychiatric Disorders After Traumatic Brain Injury: A 30-Year Follow-Up Study http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/conten...ract/159/8/1315

This article has been cited by other articles:

S. Paradiso, J. Vaidya, D. Tranel, T. Kosier, and R. G. Robinson

Nondysphoric Depression Following Stroke

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci, February 1, 2008; 20(1): 52 - 61.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

J.-K. Chen, K. M. Johnston, M. Petrides, and A. Ptito

Neural Substrates of Symptoms of Depression Following Concussion in Male Athletes With Persisting Postconcussion Symptoms

Arch Gen Psychiatry, January 1, 2008; 65(1): 81 - 89.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

E. Kim, E. C. Lauterbach, A. Reeve, D. B. Arciniegas, K. L. Coburn, M. F. Mendez, T. A. Rummans, and E. C. Coffey

Neuropsychiatric Complications of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Critical Review of the Literature (A Report by the ANPA Committee on Research)

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci, May 1, 2007; 19(2): 106 - 127.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. C. Ruocco and T. Swirsky-Sacchetti

Personality Disorder Symptomatology and Neuropsychological Functioning in Closed Head Injury

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci, February 1, 2007; 19(1): 27 - 35.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

H. Isoniemi, T. Kurki, O. Tenovuo, V. Kairisto, and R. Portin

Hippocampal volume, brain atrophy, and APOE genotype after traumatic brain injury.

Neurology, September 12, 2006; 67(5): 756 - 760.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

H M Tiesman, C Peek-Asa, P Whitten, N L Sprince, A Stromquist, and C Zwerling

Depressive symptoms as a risk factor for unintentional injury: a cohort study in a rural county.

Inj. Prev., June 1, 2006; 12(3): 172 - 177.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A.-L. Siren, K. Radyushkin, S. Boretius, D. Kammer, C.-C. Riechers, O. Natt, D. Sargin, T. Watanabe, S. Sperling, T. Michaelis, et al.

Global brain atrophy after unilateral parietal lesion and its prevention by erythropoietin

Brain, February 1, 2006; 129(2): 480 - 489.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

J. S. Paulsen, C. Nehl, K. F. Hoth, J. E. Kanz, M. Benjamin, R. Conybeare, B. McDowell, and B. Turner

Depression and Stages of Huntington's Disease

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci, November 1, 2005; 17(4): 496 - 502.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

S. Koponen, T. Taiminen, K. Honkalampi, M. Joukamaa, H. Viinamaki, T. Kurki, R. Portin, L. Himanen, H. Isoniemi, S. Hinkka, et al.

Alexithymia After Traumatic Brain Injury: Its Relation to Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and Psychiatric Disorders

Psychosom Med, September 1, 2005; 67(5): 807 - 812.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

H. S. Levin, S. R. McCauley, C. P. Josic, C. Boake, S. A. Brown, H. S. Goodman, S. G. Merritt, and S. I. Brundage

Predicting Depression Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Arch Gen Psychiatry, May 1, 2005; 62(5): 523 - 528.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

S. Koponen, T. Taiminen, V. Kairisto, R. Portin, H. Isoniemi, S. Hinkka, and O. Tenovuo

APOE-{epsilon}4 predicts dementia but not other psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury

Neurology, August 24, 2004; 63(4): 749 - 750.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

R. E. Jorge, R. G. Robinson, D. Moser, A. Tateno, B. Crespo-Facorro, and S. Arndt

Major Depression Following Traumatic Brain Injury

Arch Gen Psychiatry, January 1, 2004; 61(1): 42 - 50.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

J. R. Fann, B. Burington, A. Leonetti, K. Jaffe, W. J. Katon, and R. S. Thompson

Psychiatric Illness Following Traumatic Brain Injury in an Adult Health Maintenance Organization Population

Arch Gen Psychiatry, January 1, 2004; 61(1): 53 - 61.

[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

S. Deb

Almost half of people suffering traumatic brain injury may later be diagnosed with axis I disorders

Evid. Based Ment. Health, May 1, 2003; 6(2): 59 - 59.

[Full Text] [PDF]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wings: I could just kiss you for this find, but since I can't, I'll just have to say thank you very much. I think and feel if I presented this study to a neurologist, it might be the supporting information he would need to confirm the organic brain sysdrome Dx for depression and personality disorder and maybe even a basis for my adjustment disorder as well, although the study doesn't list or quantify it. But at least this is a big step in the right direction, each of the points in my neurological test results are covered in this study which would give definite support to any opinion by a neurologist and the neuropsychiatric test results.

Thank you once again.

Rockhound Rider :P :P B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • HadIt.com Elder

Rockhound, You did all the work! Sometimes one can over-analyze (like me)! You might consider "volunteering" as "research subject" to neuropsyche residents, in exchange for an Independent Medical Opinion. For example, University of Nevada School of Medicine http://www.medicine.nevada.edu/residency/reno/psychiatry/

Edited by Wings
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • veterans-crisis-line.jpg
    The Veterans Crisis Line can help even if you’re not enrolled in VA benefits or health care.

    CHAT NOW

  • Advertisemnt

  • question-001.jpegLooking for Answers? Here are tips for finding the answers you seek.

     

    All VA Claims questions should be posted on our forums. To post, you must register. Registration is free. You can register for a free account here.

     

    You can read the forums without registering.

     

    Tips on posting on the forums.
     

    1. Post a clear title like ‘Need help preparing PTSD claim’ or “VA med center won’t schedule my surgery” instead of ‘I have a question.
    2. Knowledgeable people who don’t have time to read all posts may skip yours if your need isn’t clear in the title. I don’t read all posts every login and will gravitate towards those I have more info on.
    3. Use paragraphs instead of one massive, rambling introduction or story. Again – You want to make it easy for others to help. If your question is buried in a monster paragraph, there are fewer who will investigate to dig it out.

     

    Leading to:

     

    Post straightforward questions and then post background information.

     

    Examples:
     
    • A. I was previously denied for apnea – Should I refile a claim?
      • Adding Background information in your post will help members understand what information you are looking for so they can assist you in finding it.
    • I was diagnosed with apnea in service and received a CPAP machine, but the claim was denied in 2008. Should I refile?
       
    • B. I may have PTSD- how can I be sure?
      • See how the details below give us a better understanding of what you’re claiming.
        • I was involved in a traumatic incident on base in 1974 and have had nightmares ever since, but I did not go to mental health while enlisted. How can I get help?

     

    This gives members a starting point to ask clarifying questions like “Can you post the Reasons for Denial from your claim?” etc.

     

    Note:

     

    • Your first posts on the board may be delayed before they appear as they are reviewed.
    • This process does not take long.
    • Your first posts on the board may be delayed before they appear as they are reviewed. The review requirement will usually be removed by the 6th post. However, we reserve the right to keep anyone on moderator preview.
    • This process allows us to remove spam and other junk posts before hitting the board. We want to keep the focus on VA Claims, and this helps us do that.
  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

    tinnitus-005.pngptsd-005.pnglumbosacral-005.pngscars-005.pnglimitation-flexion-knee-005.pngdiabetes-005.pnglimitation-motion-ankle-005.pngparalysis-005.pngdegenerative-arthitis-spine-005.pngtbi-traumatic-brain-injury-005.png

  • Advertisemnt

  • VA Watchdog

  • Advertisemnt

  • Ads

  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

    employment 2.jpeg

    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

{terms] and Guidelines

<——>