Jump to content
  • Latest Donations

  • Advertisemnt

  • 14 Questions about VA Disability Compensation Benefits Claims

    questions-001@3x.png

    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
    Continue Reading
     
  • Ads

  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

    tinnitus-005.pngptsd-005.pnglumbosacral-005.pngscars-005.pnglimitation-flexion-knee-005.pngdiabetes-005.pnglimitation-motion-ankle-005.pngparalysis-005.pngdegenerative-arthitis-spine-005.pngtbi-traumatic-brain-injury-005.png

  • Advertisemnt

  • Advertisemnt

  • Ads

  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

    employment 2.jpeg

    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

Sponsored Ads

  • Searches Community Forums, Blog and more

  • Donation Box

    Please donate to support the community.
    We appreciate all donations!
  • Available Subscriptions

allan

Exposure To Jet Fuels ....repost

Recommended Posts

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry ToxFAQs August 1999

JET FUELS JP-5 and JP-8

CAS # 8008-20-6

This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8. For

more information, call the ATSDR Information Center at 1-888-422-8737. This fact sheet is one in a series

of summaries about hazardous substances and their health effects. It’s important you understand this

information because this substance may harm you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are present.

HIGHLIGHTS: Exposure to jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8 occurs mainly in the

workplace or from accidents or spills. Breathing in large amounts of JP-5 and

JP-8 may result in headaches, difficulty in concentrating, coordination problems,

and fatigue. These chemicals have been found in at least 22 of the 1,445 National

Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency.

What are jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8?

(Pronounced jµt fy...lz JP-5 and JP-8)

Jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8 are substances used as aircraft fuels

by the military. JP-5 and JP-8 is shorthand for jet propellants

5 and 8. JP-5 is the U.S. Navy’s primary jet fuel, and JP-8 is

one of the jet fuels used by the U.S. Air Force.

Both of the substances are composed of a large number of

chemicals, and both are colorless liquids that may change into

gas vapor. They smell like kerosene, since kerosene is the

primary component of both JP-5 and JP-8. They are made by

refining either crude petroleum oil deposits found underground

or shale oil found in rock.

What happens to jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8 when

they enter the environment?

q Some chemicals in JP-5 and JP-8 will evaporate into air

from open containers or when they are spilled into water

or soil.

q JP-5 and JP-8 in air may break down by reacting with

sunlight or chemicals in air.

q Chemicals in JP-5 and JP-8 may slowly move from the

soil into groundwater.

q Other chemicals in JP-5 and JP-8 will attach to particles in

water and may sink to the bottom sediments.

q Chemicals in JP-5 and JP-8 may be broken down by bacteria

and other organisms in soil and water.

q JP-5 and JP-8 may stay in the soil for more than 10 years.

How might I be exposed to jet fuels JP-5 and

JP-8?

q Most people would not be exposed to jet fuels JP-5 and

JP-8 unless they work with these substances or live very

close to where they are used or spilled.

q Breathing air in an area where an accident or leak of jet

fuels JP-5 and JP-8 has occurred.

q Drinking water contaminated with JP-5 or JP-8.

q Touching soil contaminated with jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8.

q Working refueling military aircraft or transporting jet

fuels.

q Living near a hazardous waste site where jet fuels JP-5

and JP-8 are disposed of.

How can jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8 affect my

health?

Little is known about the effects of jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8

on people’s health. Breathing large amounts of JP-5 and JP-8

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, Public Health Service

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Page 2

Federal Recycling Program Printed on Recycled Paper

ToxFAQs Internet address via WWW is http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaq.html

Where can I get more information? For more information, contact the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease

Registry, Division of Toxicology, 1600 Clifton Road NE, Mailstop F-32, Atlanta, GA 30333. Phone: 1-888-422-8737,

FAX: 770-488-4178. ToxFAQs Internet address via WWW is http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaq.html ATSDR can tell you

where to find occupational and environmental health clinics. Their specialists can recognize, evaluate, and treat illnesses

resulting from exposure to hazardous substances. You can also contact your community or state health or environmental

quality department if you have any more questions or concerns.

JET FUELS JP-5 AND JP-8

CAS # 8008-20-6

for a short period may result in headaches, difficulty in concentrating,

coordination problems, and fatigue. Breathing

lower levels of JP-5 and JP-8 for a longer period could result in

lack of initiative, sleep disturbances, and dizziness.

Much information is available on accidental poisonings

in children from drinking kerosene. Effects seen include vomiting,

diarrhea, stomach cramps, coughing, drowsiness, and

loss of consciousness. Drinking very large amounts can result

in death. Skin exposure to kerosene results in skin irritation,

consisting of itchy, red, peeling, and sore skin.

It is not known whether jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8 can affect

reproduction or cause birth defects in people or animals.

How likely are jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8 to cause

cancer?

The International Agency for Research on Cancer has

concluded that jet fuels are not classifiable as to their carcinogenicity

to humans.

No carcinogenicity studies on jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8 are

available in people. A study on the use of kerosene stoves

found no association between their use and bronchial cancer,

while another study found an increase in oral cancer in men

who used kerosene stoves. Other studies in people are inconclusive.

An animal study showed no increase in kidney tumors

when rats breathed air containing high levels of JP-5 or JP-8

for 90 days. Skin tumors were seen in mice when their skin was

exposed to jet fuel JP-5 for 60 weeks.

Is there a medical test to show whether I’ve been

exposed to jet fuels JP-5 and JP-8?

No test shows if you have been exposed to JP-5 or JP-8.

However, tests can determine if your blood contains some of

the chemicals found in JP-5 and JP-8. However, the concentrations

of these chemicals in JP-5 and JP-8 are very low, and if

they were detected in your blood, it would not necessarily

mean that you were exposed to JP-5 or JP-8.

Has the federal government made

recommendations to protect human health?

Very few regulations or advisories are specific to jet

fuels JP-5 and JP-8. The following is a recommendation

for petroleum products, which are similar to jet fuels JP-5

and JP-8.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration and

the Air Force Office of Safety and Health have set an exposure

limit of 400 milligrams of petroleum products per cubic meter

of air (400 mg/m3) for an 8-hour workday, 40-hour workweek.

Glossary

Carcinogenicity: Ability to cause cancer.

CAS: Chemical Abstracts Service.

Milligram (mg): One thousandth of a gram.

References

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

(ATSDR). 1998. Toxicological profile for jet fuels (JP-5 and

JP-8). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human

Services, Public Health Service.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ad

Thanks for the repost. I tried doing a search, but I don't know what is going wrong.....didn't find it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Same happened to me.

I searched for "fuel" and it pulled up everthing.

Hope this is what you were looking for. If your a jet turbine machanic or boilerman, you might want to check out the post on Vanadium Pentoxide. It's the black ash left behind by the fuel. "Highly" toxic, DNA altering chemical.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No I was a "fueler", I fueled and defueled aircraft, generators and just about everything else. I remember when we had to change the filters out on the trailers....took a full day and usually spent the day soaked in JP5.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Ads

  • Ad

  • Latest News
  • Our picks

    • SHOW YOUR SUPPORT: Ad Free Subscriptions to the Forum available
      Ad free subscriptions are available for the forum. Subscriptions give you the forums ad free and help support the forum and site. Monthly $5 Annually $50 https://community.hadit.com/subscriptions/

      Every bit helps - Thank you.

       
      • 0 replies
    • Choosing a VA Disability Attorney Means Learning What Questions to Ask
      Choosing a VA Disability Attorney Means Learning What Questions to Ask. Chris Attig - Veterans Law Blog 

      <br style="color:#000000; text-align:start">How to Hire an Attorney For Your VA Claim or Appeal Free Guidebook available on the Veterans Law Blog

      I got an email the other day from a Veteran.  It had 2 or 3 sentences about his claim, and then closed at the end: “Please call me. So-and-so told me you were the best and I want your help.”

      While I appreciate the compliments, I shudder a little at emails like this.  For 2 reasons.

      First, I get a lot of emails like this.  And while I diligently represent my clients – I often tell them we will pursue their claim until we have no more appeals or until we win – I am most assuredly not the best.

      There are a LOT of damn good VA Disability attorneys out there.  (Most, if not all, of the best are members of the National Organization of Veterans Advocates…read about one of them, here)

      Second, I don’t want Veterans to choose their attorney based on who their friend thought was the best.  I want Veterans to choose the VA Disability attorney who is BEST for their case.

      In some situations, that may be the Attig Law Firm.

      But it may also be be Hill and Ponton, or Chisholm-Kilpatrick, or Bergman Moore.  Or any one of the dozens of other attorneys who have made the representation of Veterans their professional life’s work.

      There are hundreds of attorneys that are out there representing Veterans, and I’m here to tell you that who is best for your friend’s case may not be the best for your case.

      How do you Find the Best VA Disability Attorney for your Claim?

      First, you have to answer the question: do you NEED an attorney?

      Some of you don’t...
      • 1 reply
    • VA Emergency Medical Care
      VA Emergency Medical Care
      • 3 replies
    • Veterans Appeals Improvement and Modernization Act
      Veterans Appeals Improvement and Modernization Act
      • 0 replies
    • Thanks Berta for your help. I did receive my 100% today for my IU claim on 6/20/2018. It only took 64 days to complete and it is p&t. Thanks for your words of wisdom. 
×

Important Information

{terms] and Guidelines