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Desert Storm Spouse & Children Sick


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Need to pick the brains of my fellow Hadit members. I've been contacted by a woman who is the ex-wife of a Desert Storm vet. She reports he has all of the classic symptoms of Gulf War Illness and he is indeed very ill. Additionally, she and her children also have all of the symptoms and are ill!

Has anyone heard of this being contagious somehow? She said that so far the VA has not been helpful at all (surprise, surprise).

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it may be similar to the first batch of asbestos workers who mined the stuff. They brought it home and the fibers were on the clothes, The Kids were hugging daddy and mommmy was washing the clothes.

It has a very deadly history.

J

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Heroic Dr. Nicolson Warns

GWI Is A Contagious Epidemic

By Stephen Thorne

Canadian Press

2-8-99

OTTAWA (CP) -- An American research scientist says some Gulf War vets, including Canadians, are suffering from man-made contagions that have spread to their spouses, children, even pets.

Garth Nicolson of the California-based Institute for Molecular Medicine, says scientists from the non-profit centre have discovered organisms in the blood of veterans and their families.

"What we're finding is that about half of the veterans and their symptomatic family members have evidence of chronic infections," Nicolson said in an interview from Huntington Beach.

"These can be infections with bacteria, like brucella, or mycoplasmas. They're airborne contagions and they can spread."

What's even more disturbing is that Nicolson believes the contagions are manufactured, the product of an insidious chemical weapon.

Some associated with the potentially lethal ailments allude to conspiracies of X-Files proportions. Sufferers and their families, many frustrated and desperate, contend officialdom knows more than it lets on.

Military researchers have expressed doubts about the institute's findings, saying they've found no signs the illnesses are contagious and that standard blood tests have failed to confirm claims of the presence of microscopic organisms.

But the evidence, say U.S. civilian researchers, is overwhelming that what's ailing Gulf War vets is not a natural phenomenon.

"They (the mycoplasma) contain retroviral DNA sequences ... suggesting that they have been modified to make them more pathogenic and more difficult to detect," said Nicolson.

Symptoms can include anxiety, depression, chronic fatigue, environmental illness and respiratory disease. Some sufferers have contracted problems similar to multiple sclerosis or ALS; others have died or committed suicide.

Nicolson's findings have been given the scrutiny of peer-reviewed journal publications and two commercial U.S. laboratories have backed his work. Now the U.S. Veterans Affairs Department is testing it in a year-long study involving hundreds of Gulf War veterans.

"From a scientific point of view, it's an interesting hypothesis," department spokesman Terry Jemison said from Washington. "We thought that veterans deserved to have the opportunity."

Canadian military officials maintain Gulf War illness -- actually at least 14 illnesses, say researchers -- is largely the result of post-traumatic stress.

"One of the possibilities to consider is that many of the complaints of Gulf War veterans, as a group, may be an expression of having participated in a unique war with unique stresses," said a consultant's report.

But the report, filed to the Canadian government last spring, also cites possible exposure to chemical and biological warfare agents, vaccines such as anthrax and botulinum toxoid, oil-well smoke and pesticides.

Many Gulf War troops were also given pyridostigmine bromide -- similar to a muscle relaxant, said Dr. Don Philbin, a Nicolson associate in Granby, Que.

"It's supposed to build up the defence system but I think what it did was overpower the neurological defence system."

The report noted the first rotation of the Canadian naval task force had a markedly different war experience from the second rotation and other units.

"The first rotation was prior to the air war, had no administration of pyridostigmine bromide, plague or anthrax vaccine and no other war-related exposures such as oil-well smoke, spent weapons, etc.," it said.

"A majority of the second rotation experienced all or most of the above."

Why then do so many vets from both rotations report similar illnesses?

Nicolson believes the mycoplasma was transmitted among soldiers, sailors and airmen. Nicolson's institute has found the organisms in scores of U.S. service staff and their families and he believes the problem is spreading.

Mycoplasma are about the same size as viruses but unlike viruses can reproduce outside living cells. Many are harmless but the most virulent -- mycoplasma fermentans -- is the one most commonly found in Gulf veterans.

"We have found so far that about half of the hundreds of patients tested have an invasive mycoplasma infection that can result in complex signs and symptoms that can be successfully treated with antibiotics," said Nicolson, who cured his own daughter of a Gulf War-like illness.

Nicolson and his wife Nancy say they have developed new testing procedures -- gene tracking -- to diagnose the mycoplasma. They say their treatment regime has also met success in cases of chronic fatigue and other ailments.

U.S. federal researchers have trained in the Nicolsons' techniques and U.S. Veterans Affairs is following Nicolson's treatment regime, giving hundreds of affected veterans the antibiotic doxycycline to gauge its effectiveness.

For individuals, the testing costs about $150 US for an initial diagnosis; $250 US for each test thereafter.

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HI PURPLE,ITS FUNNY YOU ASK THAT QUESTION.

I AM A DESERT STORM VET AND IM VERY SICK.

I HAVE ALOT OF DIFFERENT SYMPTOMS OF A MYSTERY ILLNESS (GWS).

MY SON SUFFERS FROM EXTREME LEG PAINS LIKE ME AND HE HAS BEEN ON NAPROXEN FOR THE LAST 7YRS.

THEY TRIED TO SAY IT WAS GROWING PAINS AT FIRST AND NOW NO ONE CAN DECIDE WHY HE HAS SUCH PAIN???

I WOULDNT DOUBT IT IF IT WAS SPREAD SOMEHOW.

WE WILL NEVER GET THAT TO BE PROVEN IN MY LIFE TIME.

WE CANT EVEN GET THE VETS FROM DESERT STORM WHO ARE SUFFERING RECOGNIZED AFTER 17 YRS??? GO FIGURE

TANKERJOE0

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There is significant amount of info on DSVs and illnesses in family members-

http://www.immed.org/illness/gulfwar_illness_research.html

http://www.tricare.mil/pgulf/arch/arch8.html

plenty more-

Also Denise Richards at ALLVETS site -if you get on her mailing list- has been relentless in pursuing at the DC levcel legislation that would properly cover all diseases/disabilities in Gulf War Vets.I dont have time to even read the wealth of material she sends to me and others on her list-as to the research she has done and urging GWVs to get involved in the legislation she has proposed.

I know the lawyer involved in the GWV leichimaniasis case-

another way family members can get infected with Gulf War diseases that are contagious.

VA will only move on this with pressure from ill veterans and family members who feel their problems stem from the Gulf War.

Just google Gulf War illness and family members and much should pop up.

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Need to pick the brains of my fellow Hadit members. I've been contacted by a woman who is the ex-wife of a Desert Storm vet. She reports he has all of the classic symptoms of Gulf War Illness and he is indeed very ill. Additionally, she and her children also have all of the symptoms and are ill!

Has anyone heard of this being contagious somehow? She said that so far the VA has not been helpful at all (surprise, surprise).

This reminds me of how little people actually know about GWS. Sick family members has been a complaint since the beginning. For a time, there was much more media attention for sick family members than for the vets. I have a box full of articles about it.

Contagious? There is no question that at least one facet of GWI is contagiuos. I'm nearing the end of a GW study for IBS. I was told we contracted a bacteria that was living in our digestive tract. Treatment has seemed to help me, but the study is not done yet. A prior study had already determined the bacteria as the culprit. Several of my family now have "stomach problems".

Ever since I met my wife, about a ten year span, she has become more like me. Tired, pain, memory problems, the list goes on. She now has more bad days than good. She is now disabled and recieves SSI. Who is she going to go to for help? GWI still does not exsist for the vast majority of the medical community. Very few indeed think it can be contagious. I feel responsible for her health and sometimes cry.

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