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Vso,no,va Rep.


Phillies44

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Hello everyone, I am new and was trying to find out the difference between the three different reps. National Officer, Veterans Service Officer, of Veterans Representative.

Is there a difference? Do you think having one work on your claim is a good thing? Which on is the best out of the three? I hope this makes sense, but I am new and do not know which one to choose and if any? Thanks

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  • HadIt.com Elder

For me, it worked best to have a Service Officer, but I did

do all the leg work and turning in my own paper work to

my local R.O with a Date Stamp. This way, I knew they had it

and I had a copy of the date stamp of receipt.

For me, having one looked good on paper.

Betty

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Welcome to Hadit.

I hope that you are able to use the Board normally now.

Interview your Service Officer like you are hiring a Lawyer or Accountant. Make sure that you have confidence in them. Hadit can also help you with your claim but its mostly Veterans helping each other.

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Back when I started the process of filing a claim for IU, I used a VSO. What I found is that I was better off doing my own claims work. Some VSO's are more dedicated than others; none are as dedicated as you (if you vow to fight the good fight and don't take no for an answer).

Filing claims is a process. It takes time That's unavoidable. I use to say the VA works on the premise of attrition. Frustration or death being their targets. Having vowed to not let frustration get me down and outlived their resolve, I finally got my IU after seven years and two separate claims,without a VSO.

What was helpful was the support received from my doctor and from the VA's Voc Rehab folks.

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