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  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

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    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

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*Bergie*

C&p Exam Advice

Question

I have read quite a large number of posts from everyone regarding horror stories at c&p exams, especially PTSD exams. I know first hand as I was told during my exam for a NOD that I "have not played the game long enough" and that "I needed to wait a few years, then I'll get it". Anyway, I just thought of this, maybe someone else has mentioned it I don't know. I think that everytime we have these exams we should bring a small tape recorder and record the BS, don't mention the recorder until after the exam and see how their attitude changes. This would sure turn heads if the public could see what we go through. Another sad misconseption, the doctors at the VAMC and clinics sure don't have a clue with regard to the c&p doc's and the VARO. Ok I'm through venting, thanks for listening!!!

Have a nice day,

Bergie

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Instead, why don't you let them know upfront that you're recording and I think you have to get their permission to do it anyway. If you do it without their knowledge you best NOT tell them afterwords unless you want to set yourself up with legal issues.

Jay

I have read quite a large number of posts from everyone regarding horror stories at c&p exams, especially PTSD exams. I know first hand as I was told during my exam for a NOD that I "have not played the game long enough" and that "I needed to wait a few years, then I'll get it". Anyway, I just thought of this, maybe someone else has mentioned it I don't know. I think that everytime we have these exams we should bring a small tape recorder and record the BS, don't mention the recorder until after the exam and see how their attitude changes. This would sure turn heads if the public could see what we go through. Another sad misconseption, the doctors at the VAMC and clinics sure don't have a clue with regard to the c&p doc's and the VARO. Ok I'm through venting, thanks for listening!!!

Have a nice day,

Bergie

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It is true that, legally, you're not allowed to record a C&P exam. That's why it's a good idea to take someone with you.

It's just how the VA CYA's because they know they are screwing vets over.

I'm not sure how the reg reads though. Does it say the vet cannot record the exam? Or does it say that anyone cannot record the exam? If it's the first....well then, there's your out.

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I'm not saying "don't do it."

I'm just saying legally you're binded to inform "anyone" when you are recording a conversation.

Heck, I'd do it. I just wouldn't let the examiner know. I definetely wouldn't do it then let the examiner know I did it after the fact. That would not play into the Veterans favor. Might piss the examiner off and that's the last thing you want to do.

Even if the examiner states something in the exam that's off a little what are you accomplishing? You can't use the tape against the VA if you didn't inform the examiner you were recording it. If you did let them know before hand then "YES" you could come back with the tape and use it as evidence.

Jay

It is true that, legally, you're not allowed to record a C&P exam. That's why it's a good idea to take someone with you.

It's just how the VA CYA's because they know they are screwing vets over.

I'm not sure how the reg reads though. Does it say the vet cannot record the exam? Or does it say that anyone cannot record the exam? If it's the first....well then, there's your out.

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Here are the states that require 2-person consent.

Twelve states currently require that BOTH or ALL parties consent to the recording. These states are:

California

Connecticut

Florida

Illinois

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Montana

Nevada

New Hampshire

Pennsylvania

Washington

I have read quite a large number of posts from everyone regarding horror stories at c&p exams, especially PTSD exams. I know first hand as I was told during my exam for a NOD that I "have not played the game long enough" and that "I needed to wait a few years, then I'll get it". Anyway, I just thought of this, maybe someone else has mentioned it I don't know. I think that everytime we have these exams we should bring a small tape recorder and record the BS, don't mention the recorder until after the exam and see how their attitude changes. This would sure turn heads if the public could see what we go through. Another sad misconseption, the doctors at the VAMC and clinics sure don't have a clue with regard to the c&p doc's and the VARO. Ok I'm through venting, thanks for listening!!!

Have a nice day,

Bergie

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Jay, your list is nice. But, when dealing with the VA you are dealing with a Federal institution. When you step onto VA property, the only "state" that you are in is the United States, and you are, the minute you drive off the city street and into the VA parking lot, dealing with Federal rules and regs. Heck, the doctor's don't even have to be licensed in the state in which they practice, nor do the nurses.

And, I would not advise recording anything.

Have y'all seen the little signs as you stroll around the VA Hospital......something about recording devices and cameras and how ya ain't suppose to.

The notices ARE there. You may have to look for them, but they are there. Has something to do with HIPPA, also, and the fact that some people's presence and treatment at a medical facility are no one else's bidness.

just sayin'

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