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Jerrel

Cbw Programs

Question

Category:US CBW Programs

From Eurêka

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Project 112

Project 112 Project so thoroughly classified that its scope was not known even to top department officials, its origins went back to defense secretary Robert McNamara ordering a series of tests to see if chemical and biological weapons could be effective, 1961.

Note Joint Chiefs of Staff set up a center at Fort Douglas, Utah, to manage the program June 1962.

Whistle Down Code name for experiment conducted between at Fort Greely, Alaska, that included these tests several Sarin and VX-filled artillery shells, rockets and land mines were remotely detonated near the Gerstle River, December 1962-February 1963.

Eager Belle Code designed to determine whether aerosols containing a biological agent could penetrate US warships, launched off the coast of the Hawaiian island of Oahu a series of tests, that included a Navy vessel sprayed from a tugboat with the non-lethal bacteria Bacillus globigii “to evaluate the effectiveness of selected protective devices,” January 1963.

Big Jack Code name for exercise to see how weapons of mass destruction could penetrated the jungle canopy involving aircraft spraying simulant agents over the Fort Sherman military reservation, Panama Canal Zone, early 1963.

Night Train Code name for Bacillus globigii program, Fort Greely, Alaska, November 1963-January 1964.

Elk Hunt I Code name for VX program, Fort Greely, Alaska, July-August 1964.

Project Shad

Project Ship board Hazard and Defense (Project Shad; SHAD) Outgrowth of Project 112, Department of Defense sprayed live nerve gas and biological agents on ships and sailors in tin various parts of the world, from the Marshall Islands to Panama, Canada and Britain, to gauge how quickly they could be detected and how rapidly they would disperse, as well as to test the effectiveness of protective gear and decontamination procedures, 1964-69.

1. Shad tests Some 113 secret Shad tests were planned, of the first reported, three used sarin or VX, one used straphylococcal enterotoxin B and one harmless stimulant later found to be dangerous and one used a nonpoisonous stimulant, 1964-69.

1. Flower Drum Phase I Code name for Shad test in which USS George Eastman was sprayed with sarin and a chemical simulant and into its ventilation system while the crew wore various levels of protection, conducted off the coast of Hawaii, 1964.

2. Flower Drum Phase II Code name for Shad test in which VX gas was sprayed onto a barge to examine the ship’s washdown system and other decontamination measures.

3. Fearless Johnny Code name for Shad test in which USS George Eastman was sprayed with VX nerve gas southwest of Honolulu to “evaluate the magnitude of exterior and interior contamination levels” under various conditions of readiness, as well as study “the shipboard washdown system,” August-September 1965.

4. Deseret Test Center Test 68-50 Code name for Shad test to determine the casualty levels from a F-4 Phantom jet spraying SEB, a crippling germ toxin, over part of Eniwetok Atoll and five Army light tugs, September-October 1968.

5. Deseret Test Center Test 68-32 Code name for Shad test done southwest of Hawaii using two germs thought to be harmless, Serratia marcescens and Escherichia coli, but the former turned out to be dangerous, April-June 1969.

6. Serratia marcescens Opportunistic pathogen causing infections of the endocardium, blood wounds, and urinary and respiratory tracts.

7. Deseret 69-75 Code name for program of unknown character.

West Side I Code name for Bacillus globigii program, Fort Greely, Alaska, January-February 1965.

West Side II Code name for Bacillus globigii program, southwestern Canada, January-March 1965.

Big Tom Code name for Bacillus globigii program, near Oahu, Hawaii, May-June 1965.

Devil Hole I Code name for sarin program, Fort Greely, Alaska, Summer 1965.

Elk Hunt II Code name for VX program, Fort Greely, Alaska, Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland and Canada, June-July 1965; October-December 1965.

High Low Code name for methylacetoacetate program, Pacific Ocean off San Diego, January-February 1966.

Sun Down Code name for sarin and methylacetoacetate programs, Fort Greely, Alaska, February and April 1966.

Swamp Oak Code name for sarin program, Fort Greely, Alaska, March-April 1966.

Tall Timber Code name for ester of benzilic acid program, Hawaii, April-June 1966.

Pine Ridge Code name for sarin and ester of benzilic acid program, Hawaii, May-June 1966.

Devil Hole II Code name for VX program, Fort Greely, Alaska, July-September 1966.

Half Note Code name for Bacillus globigii program, in Pacific Ocean off Hawaii, August-September 1966.

Red Cloud Code name for Bacillus globigii and E. coli program, Fort Greely, Alaska, November 1966-February 1967.

Green Mist Code name for sarin and methylacetoacetate programs, Hawaii, March-April 1967.

Dew Point Code name for sarin program, Fort Greely, Alaska, June-July 1967.

Watch Dog Code name for Bacillus globigii and E. coli program, Fort Greely, Alaska, summer 1967.

Blue Tango Code name for 20 experiments spraying live E.coli bacteria that could sometimes be deadly to humans over the Island of Hawaii between January-March 1968.

Folded Arrow Code name for series of tests from the submarine USS Carbonero which dumped Bacillus globigii into the ocean off Oahu “to demonstrate the submarine weapons system capability to carry out an effective biological attack against an island complex and a naval port facility,” 1968.

Rapid Tan Code name for series of tests whose goal was to determine how long the nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun and VX would maintain their killing capabilities in a wooded terrain and open grassland using, Porton Down, England and Ralston, Canada, July-August 1967; May-June 1968; August-September 1968.

69-31 Code number for Bacillus globigii program, Pacific Ocean off San Diego, August-September 1968.

69-12 Code number for sarin program, Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland, spring 1969.

Pacific germ test Germs sprayed from aircraft over barges packed with monkeys and guinea pigs anchored at sea a thousand miles southwest of Hawaii, 1968.

Biological-weapons abandoned Pres. Richard M. Nixon unilaterally abandoned all offensive biological and toxin weapon research and production, November 1969.

70-73 Code number for Bacillus globigii program, Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, July-December 1970.

Retrieved from "http://www.ultralingua.com/eureka/index.php/Category:US_CBW_Programs"

Category: Chemical, Biological Warfare

Jerrel svr

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I was also involved in Project Shad stationed on the Granville, from 1964 to 1966. The shabby way the government failed to acknowledge there mistakes, or should I say they are waiting to bury there mistakes.

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Ad

Fallout from nuclear tests leads to health crisis

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090906/ap_on_.../us_health_bomb

"The United States cannot wash its hands clear of this responsibility because the islands will still have that nuclear testing effect for the next 2,000 years,"

-----

My Father was in the US Navy and served in the Marshall Islands around 1953. He died around 20 years ago. he was sick with lung and intestinal problems.

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