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unclejoe1

Bilateral Factor/hips

Question

Can anyone please tell me what would rating be for two hips with severe oa got c@p exam back stating hip flexion 90 degrees, hip abduction 5 degrees. Will neeed total hip replacments in left and right hip in near future.

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4 answers to this question

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This is assuming that your hips are service connected, and this is nothing but a claim for increase.

Normal hip flexion is to 125 degrees. You have 90 degrees of flexion. As long as you've got at least 45 degrees that's noncompensable, but for the 10 percent that we offer for painful or limited motion. A separate evaluation for the loss of abduction would be warranted. Normal is to 45 degrees. Limitation to ten degrees warrants a 20 percent (the maximum). You don't even have ten degrees of abduction.

So, you'd wind up with two 20s and two 10s. Ignoring bilateral factors, that's 48.16 percent disabled, which rounds up to 50 percent. The bilateral factors add just a couple of percentage points; sometimes it's enough to make a difference in rounding up, but I doubt it in this case.

If you're going to get each hip replaced, you need to be aware that for a prosthetic implant gives an automatic 100 percent for one year, after which your hip is rated on residuals with a minimum rating of 30 percent. I've seen veterans get a knee done, convalesce for a year with a temporary 100 percent rating, and then get the other knee done and have another year at 100 percent. I don't know whether I'd want to spend two years of my (remaining) life recovering from major surgeries, but I don't know if I'd want to have BOTH hips done at the same time either.

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In 1991 I was awarded 30% for flat feet but bilateral was not used. If both feet were flat shouldn't it be bilateral and what would that mean as far as a rating. Bilateral completely mystifies me.

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In 1991 I was awarded 30% for flat feet but bilateral was not used. If both feet were flat shouldn't it be bilateral and what would that mean as far as a rating. Bilateral completely mystifies me.

I agree Pete.

Looked up flat feet. Bilateral appears to be set in the ratings. Hope this helps you figure it out:

Per VBA 38 CFR Book C:

5276 Flatfoot, acquired:

Pronounced; marked pronation, extreme tenderness of plantar surfaces of the feet, marked inward displacement and severe spasm of the tendo achillis on manipulation, not improved by orthopedic shoes or appliances:

Bilateral 50

Unilateral 30

Severe; objective evidence of marked deformity (pronation, abduction, etc.), pain on manipulation and use accentuated, indication of swelling on use, characteristic callosities:

Bilateral 30

Unilateral 20

Moderate; weight-bearing line over or medial to great toe, inward bowing of the tendo achillis, pain on manipulation and use of the feet, bilateral or unilateral 10

Mild: symptoms relieved by built-up shoe or arch support 0

Edited by chr49

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I sort of understand bi-lateral defintion, but what about when a problems exists for both arms and both legs (neuro). is there a quad lateral type of rating? My condition(s) are so confusing so baffling, so screwed up... (in case you haven't noticed through my forum postings..)..

:wacko:

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