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    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
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  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

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    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

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gbachman

Please Help...ptsd Question

Question

I have just returned home from my 6th tour since 9/11 a few months ago(4 w/ USMC and 2 with Army). As time has gone on, I notice that stuff isnt right, and things have changed. I have alot on my mind about stuff I have done and seen.

I am currently employed in a civilian job, as I am in the National Guard for the military side, and my civilian job has good ins. So with that, my question is this. If I were to ever lose my job for whatever reason, and I was being treated for PTSD, what would be the best way to go about doing things right now, so I could make a service claim in the future if I had too?

Should I go to a civilian doctor first, get diagnosed, and then take that to the VA, or should I go to the VA, and get diagnosed by them? Would a civilian doctor's recommendations hold more weight?

Liked I said, I am not looking to get rich, or even use this until I needed it. I just want yall's opinion into the best way to go about this process.

Thanks for all of your input...

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Regarding the new PTSD regulations, you would need a PTSD diagnosis from a VA mental health provider.

The VA ,for all of it's downsides, does treat PTSD better than , in my opinion, any private psychiatrist could.

Their vet center programs (I was a Vet Center volunteer when the original PTSD diagnosis had developed in the early 1980s)have done a wonderful job in helping vets with PTSD realise they are not alone and they sure arent crazy.

I feel you should definitely get into the VA health care system for a proper diagnosis and treatment of your PTSD.

I have 2 very good friends who both denied PTSD for decades. They both get VA comp for it now. They also both have considerable other SC connected disabilities and the PTSD makes dealing with those disabilities worse sometimes than it would without it.

It is good that you realise now that something isn't quite right. My deceased husband said the same thing about his return from Vietnam.20 years later (thinking he was only veteran in the whole world who was having combat related problems)he got diagnosed with PTSD and then got a lot of support from the Vet Center (and a wife-me)and then he got great support from a VA shrink who also had served in Vietnam.

PTSD seems to get much worse as time goes by.He managed to work with a 30 % rating for years but by 1991 it was 100% SC for PTSD.

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Regarding the new PTSD regulations, you would need a PTSD diagnosis from a VA mental health provider.

The VA ,for all of it's downsides, does treat PTSD better than , in my opinion, any private psychiatrist could.

Their vet center programs (I was a Vet Center volunteer when the original PTSD diagnosis had developed in the early 1980s)have done a wonderful job in helping vets with PTSD realise they are not alone and they sure arent crazy.

I feel you should definitely get into the VA health care system for a proper diagnosis and treatment of your PTSD.

I have 2 very good friends who both denied PTSD for decades. They both get VA comp for it now. They also both have considerable other SC connected disabilities and the PTSD makes dealing with those disabilities worse sometimes than it would without it.

It is good that you realise now that something isn't quite right. My deceased husband said the same thing about his return from Vietnam.20 years later (thinking he was only veteran in the whole world who was having combat related problems)he got diagnosed with PTSD and then got a lot of support from the Vet Center (and a wife-me)and then he got great support from a VA shrink who also had served in Vietnam.

PTSD seems to get much worse as time goes by.He managed to work with a 30 % rating for years but by 1991 it was 100% SC for PTSD.

Excellent advice and insight, Berta.

Yes, for your PTSD to be "recognized" by the VA, a VA psychiatrist or psychologist MUST make that determination. As Berta said, the VA is about two light years ahead of the civilian population as a whole, and the civilian mental health providers as a group, in the diagnosis and treatment of PTSD. As such, they are much better at PROPER diagnosis of PTSD, right-off-the-bat.

To begin to receive VA care, regardless of whether it is for PTSD or whatever else may be problematic, you will need to become "enrolled" in the VA Healthcare System. Becoming "enrolled" has a couple of "primary" benefits, even if you do NOT seek any actual "medical care" from the VA Healthcare System at this time, which I won't go into right now.

HOW to become "enrolled":

Go to your nearest VA Medical Center or Community-Based Outpatient Clinic (all these facilities are listed on the VA.gov website, BTW) or look on the VA.gov website and either get or download the VA form #10-10EZ, which is the form for "enrollment" in the VA Health Care System. Fill it out and take it to your nearest VA Medical Center, to the "Eligibility Determination Office" (or mail it in to the same address, again available on the VA.gov website). I took mine in to the VA Medical Center (not far for me, just 50 miles) so that they could take my purty picture and place it on the equally purty card that they will issue you.

BINGO! YER ENROLLED.

Get them to set you up with a Primary Care Physician, if you wish to further your relationship with the VA at this time. They'll assign you a doctor, set up an appointment and get you started on your road to VA healthcare. If you wish, at this time, tell your PCP (Primary Care Physician) that you wish to be evaluated for PTSD and he/she will set up your initial "consult" with the PTSD team. I would do this, if I were you, if for no other reason than it starts you a "diagnosis" date, that will become VERY, VERY important on down the road, maybe not for years into the future, but, TRUST ME, you'll LOVE ME if you follow this advice! TRUST ME! OH, PLEASE, TRUST ME!

There are veterans that are seeing private care physicians and psychologists, for their PTSD, that are gonna KICK themselves in years to come over this very thing! I can see it coming, like a big old black smoke-belchin' steam locomotive and they are standing in the middle of the track, not KNOWING that they are in the WRONG PLACE!

Welcome, BTW!

Edited by LarryJ

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Guest Cliph

You need doNOTHING but file your claim. As of July 13, 2010 a new regulation was put in place by President Obama and Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Shinseki which says that a Combat Zone Vet is generally presumed to have experienced trauma. Now the C&P Examiner will diagnose the Veteran and if he/she finds that the Veteran has PTSD and that the Veteran's story is plausible the PTSD will be Service Connected. The staff in VA Regional Offices have been basically taken out of the loop. Now, if the Veteran claims disability for PTSD based upon the DI made him/her cry during Boot Camp or Basic Training, more exploration by the Regional Staff may be necessary(G). Basically, if you are a Combat Zone Veteran, you need prove or document NOTHING. This will speed the claims process by reducing the worlload on Regional Office Staff and the decision of the C&P Examiner is supreme. Before this there was no legal requirement that the Regional Office accept the Examining Psychiatrist's findings. Isn't that amazing, the Regional Office Adjudicators had all the power, now they have very little.

So don't worry, although I recognize the folly of telling someone with an Anxiety Disorder, "Don't worry."

President Obama has more to help Combat Veterans than any President since the VA began in 1930.

The VA Psychiatrist needs to see that you meet the APA Diagnostic Criteria for PTSD and opine that it is Service-Connected, if you are a Combat Veteran. That's all!

This new Reg applies to all PTSD Claims that are filed on or after 7/13/2010 OR are in process and have not received a decision from the Board of Veteran Appeals on or before that date.

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gbachman,

Thank you for your service, and welcome to Hadit!

Larryj & berta have given you great advise. Get enrolled in the VA Healthcare system, and let your newly assigned primary care doc, that you think you have PTSD, you'll be diagnosed and treated for your condition. I receive treatment from the VA for PTSD, and they are great!

BTW what is your 10% for?

AS far filing for a PTSD claim, I think that you should file right away! If you have PTSD from your military service, you are entitled to compensation. . . you've earned it.

Here is a link that explains the new PTSD regs http://www.va.gov/PTSD_QA.pdf

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Welcome to Hadit and thank you for your service to America. 6 tours since 2001 boggles my mind.

If you feel things are not right you should go to VA for help. Get enrolled and start the b all rolling.

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