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World News, Va Theft Of Data Included 2.5m Active Duty


RockyA1911

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Why or how would the VA have the records of active duty personnel. Active Duty personnel are not VETERANS! From my almost 11 years in the Corps I do know that HQ Marine Corps holds the records for all active duty Marines and those records stay with the Corps until such time the Marine is discharged. Same for Army, Navy, and Air Force except their records are held by their respective proponent service.

After discharge from service the records/file is sent to the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis and archived.

At this time the VA has no knowledge of your file or records unless you filed a claim, requested your records from St. Louis and sent them to the VA.

So the question is "What in the hell is the VA doing with active military personnel data in the first place, and how in the hell or what policy allows them to have and keep data on active duty personnel?"

This just doesn't jive with me.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Makes you wonder doesn't it?

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Guest morgan
So the question is "What in the hell is the VA doing with active military personnel data in the first place, and how in the hell or what policy allows them to have and keep data on active duty personnel?"

This just doesn't jive with me.

This was my first thought when I heard the news. What is going on!

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Active duty members use the MGIB and VA guarantees for home loans. Many of the 2.5 mill were reservists and national guard.

Why or how would the VA have the records of active duty personnel. Active Duty personnel are not VETERANS! From my almost 11 years in the Corps I do know that HQ Marine Corps holds the records for all active duty Marines and those records stay with the Corps until such time the Marine is discharged. Same for Army, Navy, and Air Force except their records are held by their respective proponent service.

After discharge from service the records/file is sent to the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis and archived.

At this time the VA has no knowledge of your file or records unless you filed a claim, requested your records from St. Louis and sent them to the VA.

So the question is "What in the hell is the VA doing with active military personnel data in the first place, and how in the hell or what policy allows them to have and keep data on active duty personnel?"

This just doesn't jive with me.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

You know active duty are being treated at VA hospitals. In Tampa there is a special ward for severely wounded active duty. I see active duty coming and going at the Tampa VAMC. That kind of grabs me since I cannot go to the base five miles from my house my medical treatment. I have seen active duty getting physical therapy at the VAMC.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

I have less of a problem with active duty as opposed to Tri Care Family membgers going to the VA so that they don't have to pay co pays

You know active duty are being treated at VA hospitals. In Tampa there is a special ward for severely wounded active duty. I see active duty coming and going at the Tampa VAMC. That kind of grabs me since I cannot go to the base five miles from my house my medical treatment. I have seen active duty getting physical therapy at the VAMC.
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I have less of a problem with active duty as opposed to Tri Care Family membgers going to the VA so that they don't have to pay co pays

This is misinformation. Family members of retired Veterans, tricare or otherwise, are not entitled to med care at VAMC's. If Retired military yes. They must meet the means test and pay co-pays like all Veterans unless being seen for service connected medical problems.

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Guest frank
Why or how would the VA have the records of active duty personnel. Active Duty personnel are not VETERANS! From my almost 11 years in the Corps I do know that HQ Marine Corps holds the records for all active duty Marines and those records stay with the Corps until such time the Marine is discharged. Same for Army, Navy, and Air Force except their records are held by their respective proponent service.

After discharge from service the records/file is sent to the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis and archived.

At this time the VA has no knowledge of your file or records unless you filed a claim, requested your records from St. Louis and sent them to the VA.

So the question is "What in the hell is the VA doing with active military personnel data in the first place, and how in the hell or what policy allows them to have and keep data on active duty personnel?"

This just doesn't jive with me.

I WOULDSTATE THERE IS NO LOST DATA EACH DAY THERE IS MORE ADDED TO THE LIST. LETS THINK ABOUT THIS, IF SOMEONE DID STEAL THE DATA , AND VA KEPT THIS FROM US CREIT CARDS

BILLS WOULD GO OUT OF SIGHT. BEFORE HOLDERS WOULD KNOW CARS HOMES MONEY ECT . WOULD HAPPEN WHY DID THIS NOT HAPPER? ALSO WHO WOULD WANT TO STEAL A COMPUTER? THEY ARE CHEAP SO WHY STEAL. ALSO WHY WERE FINGERPRINTS NOY TAKEN? BECAUSE THE DATA ISN,T MISSING. PLEASE GO ON WEB PAGE CALLED AGENTA READ THE ST LOUIS FIRE PAGE. MEDICAL RECORDS WERE NEVER BURNTED THEY WERE TAKEN OUT BEFORE THE FIRE. IF WE WRITE FOR THEM THEY WILL ONLY STATE RECORDS BURNED IN FIRE WHAT FIRE? ALSO IN FIRE LIST THE TIME OF MY SERVICE SHOULD OF BEEN BURNDED FOR MY LAST NAME IS P.. I GOT THOSE RECORDS FRON VA, BEFORE I ASKED FOR THEM I WROTE VA 4 TIMES ON SMR NAVY STATE MEDICAL RECORDS ARE BURNTER IN FIRE .I HEAR THERE IS A VA UUDERGROUND,I KNOW I GOT ONE CALL FROM A VA PERSON STATING RECORDS WERE ON THE WAY THAT IS HOW I GOT EVERYTHING OUT BEFORE VA HAD A CHANCE TO DISTORY MY RECORDS,VA WILL BE SURPRISED OF WHAT I HAVE CHESK OUT AGENDA

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Good start! Pass the word!

Release No. 6-05-06

June 12, 2006

VA data theft: airmen may check status on AFPC web site

RANDOLPH AIR FORCE BASE, Texas - All active duty, Guard and Reserve Airmen can check the Air Force Personnel Center Web site at http://www.afpc.randolph.af.mil to see if their personal data was compromised in the Veterans Administration data theft.

AFPC officials stress, however, the data base contains only active, Guard and Reserve members. Retired members and dependents who enter their Social Security number in the search block will receive the notice "You have not been identified as an affected member" simply because the file does not include those categories.

Members of the retiree community should read previously released Air Force Retiree News Service articles and also the information on how to protect against identity theft at http://www.firstgov.gov.

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Now it's VA Medical Records.....

June 15, 2006

Government investigators warned Wednesday that medical records maintained by the Veterans Affairs Department are vulnerable to theft because they are being transmitted over communications lines that are not secure.

Testifying before the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee about whether there had been warning signs before personal information on 26.5 million veterans and 2.2 million service members was stolen in a theft from a VA employee’s Maryland home, an assistant VA inspector general said contractors providing medical transcription services appear to not have followed basic security requirements. One contractor using offshore employees even allowed up to 30,000 records to go outside the United States, the official said.

Auditors found the majority of contracts and the majority of VA facilities did not require a patient’s personal identifiers — name, birth date and Social Security number — to be removed before contractors received the records, and many transcribers were allowed to work at home without direct supervision and without having background investigations completed on them.

There is no evidence medical records have been compromised, said Michael Staley, assistant inspector general for auditing, who added that information security problems are nothing new at VA. Over the years, the same problems have kept reappearing in terms of controlling who has access to records, terminating access for people who have left VA and with controlling passwords, he said.

“These conditions place sensitive information, including financial data and sensitive veterans, military and benefit information, at risk, possibly without detection of inadvertent or deliberate misuse, fraudulent use, improper disclosure or destruction,” Staley said.

“We continue to identify instances where out-based employees send veterans’ medical information to the VA regional office via unencrypted e-mail,” he said.

Committee members are showing increasing frustration with VA because the department’s inspector general and the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress, have been complaining for years that better security is needed. Rep. Bob Filner of California, the acting ranking Democrat on the committee, said the theft of personnel records from the VA employee’s home shows security issues have not been taken seriously. The current problem, he said, “was born of a culture of indifference.”

Rep. Steve Buyer, R-Ind., the committee chairman, said VA has received lots of warnings but it does not appear anyone took action. For example, the VA inspector general issued a report in 2004 that included 16 recommendations for improvements in information security. None has been fully followed two years later, he said.

The findings about vulnerable medical reports is “yet another example of why the administration and Congress, in a bipartisan manner, must come together to address long-standing data security vulnerabilities and take aggressive action to provide protections for veterans’ personal and sensitive information,” said Rep. Michael Michaud of Maine, ranking Democrat on the veterans’ health subcommittee.

“I do not support veterans’ private medical information being handled by third-party contractors operating overseas, especially offshore contractors who the VA has less control over,” he said.

Buyer said VA needs an overhaul because its “internal controls and information program security have been grossly inadequate for years.”

Both the VA inspector general and GAO have indicated that VA’s decentralized management and lack of accountability have resulted in major shortcomings, leading to 16 “recurring, unmitigated vulnerabilities over the past five to eight years.”

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  • HadIt.com Elder

If our medical records get out that would mean we might not be able to get medical insurance, life insurance or even credit. If this happens there should be a major lawsuit. Plus they are violating HIPPA. If my medical records are released illegally I will file a personal lawsuit, you bet under HIPPA.

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