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Berta

Ao Korea New Reg

Question

This is big for some vets denied because they didnt fit into the older time frame.

Source : VA Media email

WASHINGTON - Veterans exposed to herbicides while serving along the

demilitarized zone (DMZ) in Korea will have an easier path to access

quality health care and benefits under a Department of Veterans Affairs

(VA) final regulation that will expand the dates when illnesses caused

by herbicide exposure can be presumed to be related to Agent Orange.

"VA's primary mission is to be an advocate for Veterans," said Secretary

of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki "With this new regulation VA has

cleared a path for more Veterans who served in the demilitarized zone in

Korea to receive access to our quality health care and disability

benefits for exposure to Agent Orange."

Under the final regulation published today in the Federal Register, VA

will presume herbicide exposure for any Veteran who served between April

1, 1968, and Aug. 31, 1971, in a unit determined by VA and the

Department of Defense (DoD) to have operated in an area in or near the

Korean DMZ in which herbicides were applied.

Previously, VA recognized that Agent Orange exposure could only be

conceded to Veterans who served in certain units along the Korean DMZ

between April 1968 and July 1969.

In practical terms, eligible Veterans who have specific illnesses VA

presumes to be associated with herbicide exposure do not have to prove

an association between their illness and their military service. This

"presumption" simplifies and speeds up the application process for

benefits and ensures that Veterans receive the benefits they deserve.

Click on these links to learn about Veterans' diseases associated with

Agent Orange exposure

<http://www.publichealth.va.gov/PUBLICHEALTH/exposures/agentorange/disea

ses.asp> at

http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/diseases.asp and

birth defects in children of Vietnam-era Veterans

<http://www.publichealth.va.gov/PUBLICHEALTH/exposures/agentorange/birth

_defects.asp> at

http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/birth_defects.asp.

VA encourages Veterans with covered service in Korea who have medical

conditions that may be related to Agent Orange to submit their

applications for access to VA health care and compensation as soon as

possible so the agency can begin processing their claims.

Individuals can go to website

http://www.vba.va.gov/bln/21/AO/claimherbicide.htm

<http://www.vba.va.gov/bln/21/AO/claimherbicide.htm> to get a more

complete understanding of how to file a claim for presumptive conditions

related to herbicide exposure, as well as what evidence is needed by VA

to make a decision about disability compensation or survivors benefits.

Additional information about Agent Orange and VA's services for Veterans

exposed to the chemical is available at

www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange

<http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/> .

The regulation is available on the Office of the Federal Register

website at http://www.ofr.gov/.

# # #

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4 answers to this question

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Having just read today's VA news release and the final rule published this same day in the Federal Register, I wonder how many other locations will be added to the presumptive list in due time. I was stationed on Okinawa during the same time a former U.S. Marine was stationed there who was approved for comp by the BVA in a 1/13/98 decision based on his duties spraying toxic herbicides within the Marine Corp training area in the northern part of the island. The same Marine never saw duty in Vietnam, only Okinawa, but to my knowledge, he is the only veteran approved for comp based on exposure while assigned to Okinawa. My claim filed August 2009 is based on my TDY to Tan Son Nhut in 1962 even though I suspect I was also exposed while PCS to Kadena Okinawa. DOD continues to deny Agent Orange or its equivalent was ever used in Okinawa despite the BVA awarding comp based on exposure there. My claim is still pending almost 18 months later, but I did have a C&P exam two months ago. Not sure why it's taking so long since the VA has all of my medical records related to my prostate cancer and hairy cell leukemia, but I'll continue to be patient while waiting for a decision. I'd prefer to still be alive when that day arrives.

This is big for some vets denied because they didnt fit into the older time frame.

Source : VA Media email

WASHINGTON - Veterans exposed to herbicides while serving along the

demilitarized zone (DMZ) in Korea will have an easier path to access

quality health care and benefits under a Department of Veterans Affairs

(VA) final regulation that will expand the dates when illnesses caused

by herbicide exposure can be presumed to be related to Agent Orange.

"VA's primary mission is to be an advocate for Veterans," said Secretary

of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki "With this new regulation VA has

cleared a path for more Veterans who served in the demilitarized zone in

Korea to receive access to our quality health care and disability

benefits for exposure to Agent Orange."

Under the final regulation published today in the Federal Register, VA

will presume herbicide exposure for any Veteran who served between April

1, 1968, and Aug. 31, 1971, in a unit determined by VA and the

Department of Defense (DoD) to have operated in an area in or near the

Korean DMZ in which herbicides were applied.

Previously, VA recognized that Agent Orange exposure could only be

conceded to Veterans who served in certain units along the Korean DMZ

between April 1968 and July 1969.

In practical terms, eligible Veterans who have specific illnesses VA

presumes to be associated with herbicide exposure do not have to prove

an association between their illness and their military service. This

"presumption" simplifies and speeds up the application process for

benefits and ensures that Veterans receive the benefits they deserve.

Click on these links to learn about Veterans' diseases associated with

Agent Orange exposure

<http://www.publichealth.va.gov/PUBLICHEALTH/exposures/agentorange/disea

ses.asp> at

http://www.publichea...ge/diseases.asp and

birth defects in children of Vietnam-era Veterans

<http://www.publichealth.va.gov/PUBLICHEALTH/exposures/agentorange/birth

_defects.asp> at

http://www.publichea...th_defects.asp.

VA encourages Veterans with covered service in Korea who have medical

conditions that may be related to Agent Orange to submit their

applications for access to VA health care and compensation as soon as

possible so the agency can begin processing their claims.

Individuals can go to website

http://www.vba.va.go...imherbicide.htm

<http://www.vba.va.gov/bln/21/AO/claimherbicide.htm> to get a more

complete understanding of how to file a claim for presumptive conditions

related to herbicide exposure, as well as what evidence is needed by VA

to make a decision about disability compensation or survivors benefits.

Additional information about Agent Orange and VA's services for Veterans

exposed to the chemical is available at

www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange

<http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/> .

The regulation is available on the Office of the Federal Register

website at http://www.ofr.gov/.

# # #

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I have been working with an AF vet who was stationed at KIMPO airbase. He was there on April 1 1968. He has some AO related issues that the RO and has been denied.

I wonder how far the actual diameter will be extended.

This could be big time for him.

Thanks Berta.

J

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I don't expect them to change the older regs at all on that point John.

AO was confirmed by DOD as sprayed on the southside of the DMZ only within a 151 mile swath.

The unit list updates for Korean vets I try to post here as soon as they are updated as they include support units that VA will recognize.

The list is here in the AO forum and at NVLSP web site.

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Just to clarify what I stated as to the 151 mile long swath:

"In March 2003 VA Veterans Service Center Managers were

informed that significant information regarding Agent Orange

use in Korea along the DMZ had been made available by DOD.

That information indicates there were defoliated fields of

fire between the front line defensive positions and the south

barrier fence. The size of the treated area was a strip of

land 151 miles long and up to 350 yards wide from the fence

to north of the "civilian control line." There was no

indication that herbicide was sprayed in the DMZ itself.

Although restrictions were put in place to limit potential

for spray drift, run-off and damage to food crops, records

indicate that effects of spraying were sometimes observed as

far as 200 meters down wind."

http://www4.va.gov/vetapp10/files3/1024288.txt

In this older BVA decision the unit list is outdated and has grown.

However they give a concise explanation of the sprayed area.

I always assumed that many of the additional units could have been in down -wind area.

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