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Vaccines May Have Caused A Soldiers' Death


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Guest allanopie

Vaccines May Have Caused a Soldiers' Death

Press Release

Department of Defense

Jun 23, 2006

A panel of military physician experts has concluded that vaccinations may have caused the death of a 26-year-old Army soldier.

The soldier, Pfc. Christopher "Justin" Abston, received smallpox and injectable influenza vaccines in Nov. 18, 2005, at Fort Bragg, N.C., 16 days before suffering sudden death in his barracks room.

Following evaluation of multiple specialized test results, the panel considered a cause-and-effect relationship to be "possible." The smallpox vaccine received by Abston is known to cause an inflammation of the heart muscle or myocarditis, a condition found at his autopsy.

Evidence of the vaccinia virus, the main ingredient of smallpox vaccine, was not found in his heart muscle, but evidence of a different virus, parvovirus B19, was found. Natural infection with parvovirus B19 is another known cause of heart inflammation and death. The expert panel cautioned that the findings pointing to vaccinations were neither probable nor unlikely, but they do suggest the possibility that the vaccines may have caused Abston's death.

Among the one million military personnel given smallpox vaccine since December 2002, 120 developed myocarditis or similar conditions, but none of them died. DoD screens all personnel to be given smallpox vaccinations and about eight percent are excluded due to screening criteria. It also advises all smallpox vaccine recipients, who develop chest pain after smallpox vaccination to seek medical care without delay. In the 120 cases mentioned above, such chest pain most often occurred in the first three weeks after smallpox vaccination.

The DoD conducts its smallpox vaccination program to protect troops assigned to U.S. Central Command, U.S. Forces Korea, or designated units with homeland defense missions.

Source:

http://www.veteransforamerica.org/index.cfm/Page/Article/ID/7408

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  • HadIt.com Elder
Vaccines May Have Caused a Soldiers' Death

Press Release

Department of Defense

Jun 23, 2006

A panel of military physician experts has concluded that vaccinations may have caused the death of a 26-year-old Army soldier.

The soldier, Pfc. Christopher "Justin" Abston, received smallpox and injectable influenza vaccines in Nov. 18, 2005, at Fort Bragg, N.C., 16 days before suffering sudden death in his barracks room.

Following evaluation of multiple specialized test results, the panel considered a cause-and-effect relationship to be "possible." The smallpox vaccine received by Abston is known to cause an inflammation of the heart muscle or myocarditis, a condition found at his autopsy.

Evidence of the vaccinia virus, the main ingredient of smallpox vaccine, was not found in his heart muscle, but evidence of a different virus, parvovirus B19, was found. Natural infection with parvovirus B19 is another known cause of heart inflammation and death. The expert panel cautioned that the findings pointing to vaccinations were neither probable nor unlikely, but they do suggest the possibility that the vaccines may have caused Abston's death.

Among the one million military personnel given smallpox vaccine since December 2002, 120 developed myocarditis or similar conditions, but none of them died [immediately] . DoD screens all personnel to be given smallpox vaccinations and about eight percent are excluded due to screening criteria. It also advises all smallpox vaccine recipients, who develop chest pain after smallpox vaccination to seek medical care without delay. In the 120 cases mentioned above, such chest pain most often occurred in the first three weeks after smallpox vaccination.

The DoD conducts its smallpox vaccination program to protect troops assigned to U.S. Central Command, U.S. Forces Korea, or designated units with homeland defense missions.

Source:

http://www.veteransforamerica.org/index.cfm/Page/Article/ID/7408

Allan, Thanks for reporting this! I boldfaced certain statements that seems loaded with double-speak . . . I'm sure there's more to this story, and I'm already doubting any further investigation would be turned over to an independed "panel".

Allan, have you heard anything about other DoD immunizations being tainted with "parvovirus B19"? What the hell is it?! ~Wings

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Allan, Thanks for reporting this! I boldfaced certain statements that seems loaded with double-speak . . . I'm sure there's more to this story, and I'm already doubting any further investigation would be turned over to an independed "panel".

Allan, have you heard anything about other DoD immunizations being tainted with "parvovirus B19"? What the hell is it?! ~Wings

********************************************************************************

******

Hello Wings,

"parvovirus B19"?

I don't recall coming across anything prior to this article.

Will this help get you started?

##########################

1: Curr Top Microbiol Immunol, 2006;299:349-70.Related Articles, Links

Parvovirus variation for disease: a difference with RNA viruses?

Lopez-Bueno A, Villarreal LP, Almendral JM.

Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas-Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid, Spain.

The Parvoviridae, a family of viruses with single-stranded DNA genomes widely spread from invertebrates to mammal and human hosts, display a remarkable evolutionary capacity uncommon in DNA genomes. Parvovirus populations show high genetic heterogeneity and large population sizes resembling the quasispecies found in RNA viruses. These viruses multiply in proliferating cells, causing acute, persistent or latent infections relying in the immunocompetence and developmental stage of the hosts. Some parvovirus populations in natural settings, such as carnivore autonomous parvoviruses or primate adeno associated virus, show a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. However, other parvoviruses such as the pathogenic B19 human erythrovirus or the porcine parvovirus, show little genetic variation, indicating different virus-host relationships. The Parvoviridae evolutionary potential in mammal infections has been modeled in the experimental system formed by the immunodeficient scid mouse infected by the minute virus of mice (MVM) under distinct immune and adaptive pressures. The sequence of viral genomes (close to 10(5) nucleotides) in emerging MVM pathogenic populations present in the organs of 26 mice showed consensus sequences not representing the complex distribution of viral clones and a high genetic heterogeneity (average mutation frequency 8.3 x 10(-4) substitutions/nt accumulated over 2-3 months). Specific amino acid changes, selected at a rate up to 1% in the capsid and in the NS2 nonstructural protein, endowed these viruses with new tropism and increased fitness. Further molecular analysis supported the notion that, in addition to immune pressures, the affinity of molecular interactions with cellular targets, as the Crml nuclear export receptor or the primary capsid receptor, as well as the adaptation to tissues enriched in proliferating cells, are major selective factors in the rapid parvovirus evolutionary dynamics.

Publication Types:

PMID: 16568906 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...l=pubmed_docsum

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(((ALAN))) I heard the word PARVO, and thought DOG. Canine is what this article tells me. PARVO is a disease that kills young pups! Sounds like the "B19" is specific to humans . . . In this context (DoD immunizations), sounds awfully fishy to me! ~Wings

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(DoD immunizations), sounds awfully fishy to me! ~Wings

Fishy? With Rummy & the DECIDER in charge? How can that be?

It may sound fishy, but I bet it doesn't smell as good.

In this study, they say they used infected mice. History tells me, the DOD has used military personel for similar studies. I've been searching for yrs, but the death of this soldier from vaccines, is the first i've come across.

Possibly another adjuvant? I'll keep digging through the muck & see what shines.

##############################################################

(((ALAN))) I heard the word PARVO, and thought DOG. Canine is what this article tells me. PARVO is a disease that kills young pups! Sounds like the "B19" is specific to humans . . . In this context (DoD immunizations), sounds awfully fishy to me! ~Wings
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SMALLPOX VACCINATION PROGRAM

http://www.smallpox.mil/event/panelreport.asp

Safety Panel Reports

Panels Find Vaccines May Relate to Reservist's Illness, Death

The Department of Defense today announced findings of two independent panels of medical experts who evaluated the possibility of a relationship between vaccination and the illnesses or deaths of four individuals. Among the four cases, the panels found only one case where vaccination may have contributed to an illness that led to death.

Both panels concluded that vaccinations may have triggered an illness that ultimately led to the death in April 2003 of Spc. Rachel Lacy, a 22-year-old Army Reservist, who received several vaccinations at the time she was mobilized for duty. The panels determined that evidence favored a causal relationship, but that the evidence was not conclusive. Each panel said that it was unable scientifically to identify a specific vaccination as the possible cause since several vaccinations were administered at one time.

In the review of the three other cases, the panels reviewed and found no association with vaccination in any of these cases. The patient diagnoses in these cases were: drug overdose, pulmonary embolism and atrial fibrillation.

Q&A - Vaccination Possible Cause of Soldier's Illness and Death

Q - What can you say about the role of vaccination in the death of Specialist Rachel Lacy?

A - Two expert panels concluded that vaccination may have caused an illness that ultimately led to the death of Specialist Lacy. Neither panel could scientifically identify a specific vaccine.

Q - Will this finding of a likely association cause DoD to stop its vaccination programs?

A - No. DoD will continue its vaccination programs.

more ... http://www.smallpox.mil/documents/919safetypanelQA.pdf

Learning from Adverse Events After Vaccination

The U.S. Army lost a valuable soldier in April 2003, a month after receiving five vaccinations during mobilization. Two independent panels of medical experts evaluated her case and concluded that vaccination may have triggered the lupus-like illness that ultimately led to her death, but that the evidence was not conclusive. Each panel said that it was unable scientifically to identify a specific vaccination as the possible trigger.

Memorandum [26 NOV 03] http://www.smallpox.mil/documents/444learningAdEvents.pdf

ACTION Memorandum [10 FEB 04] http://www.smallpox.mil/documents/446LearningfromAdverse.pdf

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Guest allanopie

>Each panel said that it was unable scientifically to identify a specific vaccination as the possible trigger.

Thank you lady!

Unable or unwilling?

The Naval Aeronautics Research was testing monkeys & found parvo b19 way before it was recognized in humans in 1975.

Human research on military personnel via vaccines, "WITHOUT THEIR CONSENT", was performed prior to 1975.

"PROJECT SHAD" ring a bell?

Between 1967 & 1975 when parvo b19 was finally reconized as a rising human disease, what humans did they use to base the study on? Inmates & military personnel maybe?

Could this be a cause of DJD, DDD, Lupus, Arthritis, Fibromyalgia, MS, heart conditions, etc among our military?

Mandatory vaccinations ordered by our DECIDER, should be added in as the cost of War.

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