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Independent Living Program Information

Question

NOTE: I HAVE TRIED TO INPUT ALL MY RESEARCH. AT THE MOMENT FIREHOST IS NOT ALLOWING IT ALL IN. THEREFORE HERE IS WHAT I HAVE BEEN ABLE TO INPUT...

ILP – INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM

A member of VBN asked if I could find information on the Independent Living Program. Well, knowing nothing about this program, I said I would see what I could do. Since putting this information along with other member comments on VBN, I decided to post some of my research on Hadit. I know many do not visit both sites, so wished to provide this information to those who just visit Hadit.

This is the result.

I have broken down my research to utilize a REPLY for each segment.

Original Post - VA Website

Original Post - Wikipedia explanation

Title 38 Excerpts

Guidelines for the Administration of an Independent Living Plan

M28 Part 2, Chapter 8 - Program of Independent Living Services

Forms used for Independent Living Program

Solicitation (2007) for Independent Living Skills Assessment

Here we go….

**********************

VA website:

http://www.vba.va.gov/bln/vre/ilp.htm

***********************

Wikipedia offered this explanation:

The Independent Living Program is a United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program aimed at making sure that each eligible veteran is able to live independently to their maximum capacity. The program is commonly referred to as VA ILP. The program is a two-year program that can be extended up to 28 months. There is an enrollment cap of 2500 (Note from FB: now 2600) participants per year. VA ILP may include the following services:

- assistive technology specialized medical, health, and / or rehabilitation services

- services to address any personal and / or family adjustment issues

- independent living skills training connection with community-based support services

- individualized equipment to assist with possible employment, volunteer opportunities or to decrease social isolation

- animals to assist with coping or independent movement

- attendant care during the period of transition

- transportation when special arrangements are needed

- peer counseling

- training to improve awareness of rights and needs

WHO QUALIFIES?

In order to qualify for the ILP, a veteran must meet the following criteria:

- Be eligible to enroll for VR&E services

- Have service-connected disabilities that inhibit the ability to purse an employment goal

- Have a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) determine that employment goals are not currently feasible.

It is noteworthy to mention that enrollment into ILP does NOT affect any benefits the veteran is receiving from VA or the Social Security Administration.

PROCESS

Once the veteran has been identified as qualifying for the ILP, an evaluation of the veteran's independent living needs will be conducted.

The VRC assigns a VA consultant to conduct an Assessment of Needs at the home of the veteran.

The Assessment of Needs is used by the VRC to create an Individualized Independent Living Plan (IILP).

Based on the amount required to fulfill the IILP, the IILP is either approved at the Local (up to $25,000), Regional ($25,000 to $75,000), or Central/D.C. (over $75,000) level.

Upon approval, the plan is implemented.

INDIVIDUALIZED INDEPENDENT LIVING PLAN

The IILP, as mentioned above, is created by the VRC with input from the VA consultant. Care is taken to ensure the IILP is consistent with the principles and goals of the Veterans Affairs Administration. The philosophical framework for the IILP is composed of the following nine principles.

1. Enhance participation in activities of daily living (ADL).

2. Assist the veteran in participating to the maximum extent possible and desirable in family and community life.

3. Provide the most effective services and assistive technology based on sound research evidence.

4. Provide required holistic evaluation and services for all veterans who qualify.

5. Develop rehabilitation plans that provide services to address all identified independent living needs.

6. Consider the veteran's expressed interests and desires, but provide services based on objectively identified needs.

7. Establish goals and measure/verify outcomes.

8. Provide services that produce a sustaining influence that continues after rehabilitation services are completed, and

9. Explore the possibility of paid or volunteer employment, when feasible

http://en.wikipedia...._Living_Program

Edited by fanaticbooks

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TITLE 38 Excerpts

I have left off the Sources, Misc., list of amendments’ listings, and other such stuff, since anyone wanting to read them can go to the source.

Title 38: Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief

PART 21—VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION

Subpart A—Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31

Independent Living Services

§ 21.160 Independent living services.

(a) Purpose. The purpose of independent living services is to assist eligible veterans whose ability to function independently in family, community, or employment is so limited by the severity of disability (service and nonservice-connected) that vocational or rehabilitation services need to be appreciably more extensive than for less disabled veterans.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3104(a)(15), 3109, 3120)

(b) Definitions. The term independence in daily living means the ability of a veteran, without the services of others or with a reduced level of the services of others, to live and function within the veteran's family and community.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3101(2))

© Situations under which independent living services may be furnished. Independent living services may be furnished:

(1) As part of a program to achieve rehabilitation to the point of employability;

(2) As part of an extended evaluation to determine the current reasonable feasibility of achieving a vocational goal;

(3) Incidental to a program of employment services; or

(4) As a program of rehabilitation services for eligible veterans for whom achievement of a vocational goal is not currently reasonably feasible. This program of rehabilitation services may be furnished to help the veteran:

(i) Function more independently in the family and community without the assistance of others or a reduced level of the assistance of others;

(ii) Become reasonably feasible for a vocational rehabilitation program; or

(iii) Become reasonably feasible for extended evaluation.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3104(a)(15), 3109, 3120)

(d) Services which may be authorized. The services which may be authorized as part of an IILP (Individualized Independent Living Plan) include:

(1) Any appropriate service which may be authorized for a vocational rehabilitation program as that term is defined in §21.35(i), except for a course of education or training as described in §21.120; and

(2) Independent living services offered by approved independent living centers and programs which are determined to be necessary to carry out the veteran's plan including:

(i) Evaluation of independent living potential;

(ii) Training in independent living skills;

(iii) Attendant care;

(iv) Health maintenance programs; and

(v) Identifying appropriate housing accommodations.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3104(a)(15), 3109, 3120)

(e) Coordination with other VA elements and other Federal, State, and local programs. Implementation of programs of independent living services and assistance will generally require extensive coordination with other VA and non-VA programs. If appropriate arrangements cannot be made to provide these services through VA, other governmental, private nonprofit and for-profit agencies and facilities may be used to secure necessary services if the requirements contained in §21.294 are met.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3104(a)(15), 3109, 3115, 3120)

[49 FR 40814, Oct. 18, 1984, as amended at 53 FR 50957, Dec. 19, 1988; 55 FR 42186, Oct. 18, 1990]

**************************

Title 38: Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief

PART 21—VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION

Subpart A—Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31

Independent Living Services

§ 21.162 Participation in a program of independent living services.

(a) Approval of a program of independent living services. A program of independent living services and assistance is approved when:

(1) The VA determines that achievement of a vocational goal is not currently reasonably feasible;

(2) The VA determines that the veteran's independence in daily living can be improved, and the gains made can reasonably be expected to continue following completion of the program;

(3) All steps required by §§21.90 and 21.92 of this part for the development and preparation of an Individualized Independent Living Plan (IILP) have been completed; and

(4) The VR&E Officer concurs in the IILP.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3104(a)(15), 3109, 3120)

(b) Considerations for the VR&E Officer. The VR&E Officer will consider the following factors in administering programs providing independent living services:

(1) If VA resources available limit the number of veterans who may be provided a program of independent living services and assistance, the first priority shall be given to veterans for whom the reasonable feasibility of achieving a vocational goal is precluded solely as a result of service-connected disability; and

(2) To the maximum extent feasible, a substantial portion of veterans provided with programs of independent living services and assistance shall be receiving long-term care in VA medical centers and nursing homes.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3120©)

[49 FR 40814, Oct. 18, 1984, as amended at 53 FR 50957, Dec. 19, 1988; 55 FR 48842, Nov. 23, 1990; 62 FR 17708, Apr. 11, 1997]

*****************************************

Title 38: Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief

PART 21—VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION

Subpart A—Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31

Case Status

§ 21.192 “Independent living program” status.

(a) Purpose. The independent living program status serves to:

(1) Identify veterans who are being furnished a program of independent living services by VA; and

(2) Assure that such veterans receive necessary services from VA in a timely manner.

(b) Assignment to independent living program status. A veteran may be assigned or reassigned to independent living program status under the provisions of §§21.88, 21.94, 21.96, or 21.98.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3107)

© Continuation in independent living program status. A veteran will be in independent living program status during periods in which:

(1) The provisions of §21.282 for induction into a program are met, but the veteran is pending induction into the facility at which rehabilitation services will be provided;

(2) The veteran receives rehabilitation services prescribed in an IILP; or

(3) The veteran is on authorized leave of absence status.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3109, 3120)

(d) Termination of independent living program status. When a veteran's case has been assigned to independent living program status, the case will be terminated from that status, if one of the following occurs:

(1) A veteran, who has been notified of necessary arrangements to begin a program, the date the program begins and instructions as to the next steps to be taken:

(i) Fails to report and does not respond to followup contact by the case manager;

(ii) Declines or refuses to enter the program; or

(iii) Defers entry for more than 30 days beyond the scheduled beginning date, unless the deferment is due to illness or other sufficient reason.

(2) The veteran completes the IILP;

(3) Either the veteran or VA interrupts the program;

(4) Either the veteran or VA discontinues the program; or

(5) Service-connection for the veteran's service-connected disability is severed by VA or he or she otherwise ceases to be eligible.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3109, 3110)Cross-References:

See §§21.160 Independent living services, 21.282 Effective date of induction into a rehabilitation program, 21.322 Commencing date, and 21.324 Reduction or termination date.

******************************

NOTE: There are additional sections noted in the above two. They can be explored, but I felt they did not impact this topic enough to be printed here.

*******************************

Title 38: Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief

PART 21—VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION

Subpart A—Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31

Duration of Rehabilitation Programs

§ 21.76 Independent living.

(a) General. A program of independent living services may be authorized to enable the veteran to:

(1) Reach the goals of the program, and

(2) Maintain the newly achieved level of independence in daily living.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3101(4), 3104(b))

(b) Period of independent living services. The duration of an independent living services program may not exceed 24 months unless the counseling psychologist finds that an additional period of up to 6 months would enable the veteran to substantially increase his or her level of independence in daily living. The concurrence of the Vocational Counseling and Rehabilitation Officer in this finding is required.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3105(d))

[49 FR 40814, Oct. 18, 1984, as amended at 54 FR 37332, Sept. 8, 1989]

**********************************************

Title 38: Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief

PART 21—VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION

Subpart A—Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31

Individualized Written Rehabilitation Plan

§ 21.90 Individualized independent living plan.

(a) Purpose. The purpose of the IILP is to identify the steps through which a veteran, whose disabilities are so severe that a vocational goal is not currently reasonably feasible, can become more independent in daily living within the family and community.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3109, 3120)

(b) Elements of the plan. The IILP shall follow the same structure as the IWRP. The plan will include:

(1) Services which may be provided under Chapter 31 to achieve independence in daily living;

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3104)

(2) Utilization of programs with a demonstrated capacity to provide independent living services for severely handicapped persons;

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3104(b), 3120(a))

(3) Services provided under other Department of Veterans Affairs and non-Department of Veterans Affairs programs needed to achieve the goals of the plan;

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3107)

(4) Arrangements for maintaining the improved level of independence following completion of the plan.

(Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3107(a))

**********************************

Title 38: Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief

PART 21—VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION

Subpart A—Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31

Rate of Pursuit

§ 21.310 Rate of pursuit of a rehabilitation program.

(d) Rehabilitative services. Measurement of the rate of pursuit for veterans in programs consisting primarily of services designed to evaluate and improve physical and psychological functioning will be assessed under this paragraph.

(1) The services assessed under this paragraph include:

(i) Evaluation and improvement of the rehabilitation potential of a veteran for whom attainment of a vocational goal is reasonably feasible;

(ii) Extended evaluation to determine whether attainment of a vocational goal is reasonably feasible; or

(iii) A program of independent living services to enable a veteran to function more independently in his or her family and community when attainment of a vocational goal is not reasonably feasible.

(2) Measurement of the rate of pursuit for services and programs named in paragraph (d)(1) of this section will be:

(i) As provided in paragraph (a) of this section for services furnished by educational institutions; or

(ii) According to the noneducational facility's customary criteria for full-time and part-time pursuit. If the facility does not have established criteria for full-time and part-time pursuit, or services are being provided by more than one facility, the rate of pursuit will be assessed in the following manner:

Rate of pursuit---Clock hours per month

Full-time---120 or more.

Three-quarter time1---90–119.

Half-time1---60–89.

Quarter-time1---30–59.

1Extended evaluation and independent living.

***************************************

Office of the Law Revision Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives

38 USC Sec. 3107 02/01/2010

TITLE 38 - VETERANS' BENEFITS

PART III - READJUSTMENT AND RELATED BENEFITS

CHAPTER 31 - TRAINING AND REHABILITATION FOR VETERANS WITH SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITIES

Sec. 3107. Individualized vocational rehabilitation plan

(a) The Secretary shall formulate an individualized written plan of vocational rehabilitation for a veteran described in section 3106(b) of this title. Such plan shall be developed with such veteran and shall include, but not be limited to

(1) a statement of long-range rehabilitation goals for such veteran and intermediate rehabilitation objectives related to achieving such goals,

(2) a statement of the specific services (which shall include counseling in all cases) and assistance to be provided under this chapter,

(3) the projected date for the initiation and the anticipated durationof each such service, and

(4) objective criteria and an evaluation procedure and schedule for determining whether such objectives and goals are being achieved.

(b) The Secretary shall review at least annually the plan formulated under subsection (a) of this section for a veteran and shall afford such veteran the opportunity to participate in each such review. On the basis of such review, the Secretary shall

(1) redevelop such plan with such veteran if the Secretary determines, under regulations which the Secretary shall prescribe, thatredevelopment of such plan is appropriate, or

(2) disapprove redevelopment of such plan if the Secretary determines, under such regulations, that redevelopment of such plan is not appropriate.

©(1) Each veteran for whom a plan has been developed or redeveloped under subsection (a) or (b)(1), respectively, of this section or in whose case redevelopment of a plan has been disapproved under subsection (b)(2) of this section, shall be informed of such veteran's opportunity for a review as provided inparagraph (2) of this subsection.

(2) In any case in which a veteran does not agree to such plan as proposed, to such plan as redeveloped, or to the disapproval of redevelopment of such plan, such veteran may submit to the person described in section 3106(f) of this title a written statement containing such veteran's objections and request a review of such plan as proposed or redeveloped, or a review of the disapproval of redevelopment of such plan, as the case may be.

(3) The Secretary shall review the statement submitted under paragraph (2) of this subsection and the plan as proposed or as redeveloped, and, if applicable, the disapproval of redevelopment of the plan, and render a decision on such review not later than ninety days after the date on which such veteran submits such statement, unless the case is one for which a longer period for review, not to exceed 150 days after such veteran submits such statement, is allowed under regulations prescribed by the Secretary, in which case the Secretary shall render a decision no later than the last day of the period prescribed in such regulations.

Office of the Law Revision Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives

*********************************

Office of the Law Revision Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives

38 USC Sec. 3109 02/01/2010

TITLE 38 - VETERANS' BENEFITS

PART III - READJUSTMENT AND RELATED BENEFITS

CHAPTER 31 - TRAINING AND REHABILITATION FOR VETERANS WITH SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITIES

Sec. 3109. Entitlement to independent living services and assistance

In any case in which the Secretary has determined under section 3106(e) of this title that the achievement of a vocational goal by a veteran currently is not reasonably feasible, such veteran shall be entitled, in accordance with the provisions of section 3120 of this title, to a program of independent living services and assistance designed to enable such veteran to achieve maximum independence in daily living.

Office of the Law Revision Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives

***********************************

38 USC Sec. 3105 02/01/2010

TITLE 38 - VETERANS' BENEFITS

PART III - READJUSTMENT AND RELATED BENEFITS

CHAPTER 31 - TRAINING AND REHABILITATION FOR VETERANS WITH SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITIES

Sec. 3105. Duration of rehabilitation programs

(d)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), the period of a program of independent living services and assistance for a veteran under this chapter (following a determination by the Secretary that such veteran's disability or disabilities are so severe that the achievement of a vocational goal currently is not reasonably feasible) may not exceed twenty-four months.

(2)(A) The period of a program of independent living services and assistance for a veteran under this chapter may exceed twenty-four months as follows:

(i) If the Secretary determines that a longer period is necessary and likely to result in a substantial increase in the veteran's level of independence in daily living.

(ii) If the veteran served on active duty during the Post-9/11 Global Operations period and has a severe disability (as determined by the Secretary for purposes of this clause) incurred or aggravated in such service.

(B) In this paragraph, the term "Post-9/11 Global Operations period" means the period of the Persian Gulf War beginning on September 11, 2001, and ending on the date thereafter prescribed by Presidential proclamation or by law.

**********************************

Office of the Law Revision Counsel, U.S. House of Representatives

38 USC Sec. 3120 02/01/2010

TITLE 38 - VETERANS' BENEFITS

PART III - READJUSTMENT AND RELATED BENEFITS

CHAPTER 31 - TRAINING AND REHABILITATION FOR VETERANS WITH SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITIES

Sec. 3120. Program of independent living services and assistance

(a) The Secretary may, under contracts with entities described in subsection (f) of this section, or through facilities of the Veterans Health Administration, which possess a demonstrated capability to conduct programs of independent living services for severely handicapped persons, provide, under regulations which the Secretary shall prescribe, programs of independent living services and assistance under this chapter, in various geographic regions of the United States, to veterans described in subsection (b) of this section.

(b) A program of independent living services and assistance may be made available under this section only to a veteran who has a serious employment handicap resulting in substantial part from a service-connected disability described in section 3102(1)(A)(i) of this title and with respect to whom it is determined under section 3106(d) or (e) of this title that the achievement of a vocational goal currently is not reasonably feasible.

© The Secretary shall, to the maximum extent feasible, include among those veterans who are provided with programs of independent living services and assistance under this section substantial numbers of veterans described in subsection (b) of this section who are receiving long-term care in Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals and nursing homes and in nursing homes with which the Secretary contracts for the provision of care to veterans.

(d) A program of independent living services and assistance for a veteran shall consist of such services described in section 3104(a) of this title as the Secretary determines necessary to enable such veteran to achieve maximum independence in daily living. Such veteran shall have the same rights with respect to an individualized written plan of services and assistance as are afforded veterans under section 3107 of this title.

(e) Programs of independent living services and assistance shall be initiated for no more than 2600 (!1) veterans in each fiscal year, and the first priority in the provision of such programs shall be afforded to veterans for whom the reasonable feasibility of achieving a vocational goal is precluded solely as a result of a service-connected disability.

(f) Entities described in this subsection are

(1) public or nonprofit agencies or organizations, and

(2) for-profit entities in cases in which the Secretary determines that services comparable in effectiveness to services available from such an entity are not available, or cannot be obtained cost-effectively from, public or nonprofit agencies or through facilities of the Veterans Health Administration.

******************************

38 USC Sec. 3104 02/01/2010

TITLE 38 - VETERANS' BENEFITS

PART III - READJUSTMENT AND RELATED BENEFITS

CHAPTER 31 - TRAINING AND REHABILITATION FOR VETERANS WITH SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITIES

Sec. 3104. Scope of services and assistance

(a) Services and assistance which the Secretary may provide under this chapter, pursuant to regulations which the Secretary shall prescribe, include the following:

(1) Evaluation, including periodic reevaluations as appropriate with respect to a veteran participating in a rehabilitation program, of the potential for rehabilitation of a veteran, including diagnostic and related services (A) to determine whether the veteran has an employment handicap or a serious employment handicap and whether a vocational goal is reasonably feasible for such veteran, and (B) to provide a basis for planning a suitable vocational rehabilitation program or a program of services and assistance to improve the vocational rehabilitation potential or independent living status of such veteran, as appropriate.

(2) Educational, vocational, psychological, employment, and personal adjustment counseling.

(3) An allowance and other appropriate assistance, as authorized by section 3108 of this title.

(4) A work-study allowance as authorized by section 3485 of this title.

(5) Placement services to effect suitable placement in employment, and postplacement services to attempt to insure satisfactory adjustment in employment.

(6) Personal adjustment and work adjustment training.

(7)(A) Vocational and other training services and assistance, including individualized tutorial assistance, tuition, fees, books, supplies, handling charges, licensing fees, and equipment and other training materials determined by the Secretary to be necessary to accomplish the purposes of the rehabilitation program in the individual case.

(B) Payment for the services and assistance provided under subparagraph (A) of this paragraph shall be made from funds available for the payment of readjustment benefits.

( Loans as authorized by section 3112 of this title.

(9) Treatment, care, and services described in chapter 17 of this title.

(10) Prosthetic appliances, eyeglasses, and other corrective and assistive devices.

(11) Services to a veteran's family as necessary for the effective rehabilitation of such veteran.

(12) For veterans with the most severe service-connected disabilities who require homebound training or self-employment, or both homebound training and self-employment, such license fees and essential equipment, supplies, and minimum stocks of materials as the Secretary determines to be necessary for such a veteran to begin employment and are within the criteria and costlimitations that the Secretary shall prescribe in regulations for the furnishing of such fees, equipment, supplies, and stocks.

(13) Travel and incidental expenses under the terms and conditions set forth in section 111 of this title, plus, in the case of a veteran who because of such veteran's disability has transportation expenses in addition to those incurred by persons not so disabled, a special transportation allowance to defray such additional expenses during rehabilitation, job seeking, and the initial employment stage.

(14) Special services (including services related to blindness and deafness) including -

(A) language training, speech and voice correction, training in ambulation, and one-hand typewriting;

(B) orientation, adjustment, mobility, reader, interpreter, and related services; and

© telecommunications, sensory, and other technical aids and devices.

(15) Services necessary to enable a veteran to achieve maximum independence in daily living.

(16) Other incidental goods and services determined by the Secretary to be necessary to accomplish the purposes of a rehabilitation program in an individual case.

********************************

38 USC Sec. 3106 02/01/2010

TITLE 38 - VETERANS' BENEFITS

PART III - READJUSTMENT AND RELATED BENEFITS

CHAPTER 31 - TRAINING AND REHABILITATION FOR VETERANS WITH SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITIES

Sec. 3106. Initial and extended evaluations; determinations regarding serious employment handicap

(d) In any case in which the Secretary has determined that a veteran has a serious employment handicap and also determines, following such initial and any such extended evaluation, that achievement of a vocational goal currently is not reasonably feasible, the Secretary shall determine whether the veteran is capable of participating in a program of independent living services and assistance under section 3120 of this title.

(e) The Secretary shall in all cases determine as expeditiously as possible whether the achievement of a vocational goal by a veteran currently is reasonably feasible. In the case of a veteran provided extended evaluation under subsection © of this section (including any periods of extensions under section 3105(a) of this title), the Secretary shall make such determination not later than the end of such extended evaluation or period of extension, as the case may be. In determining whether the achievement of a vocational

goal currently is reasonably feasible, the Secretary shall resolve any reasonable doubt in favor of determining that such achievement currently is reasonably feasible.

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Guidelines for the Administration of an Independent Living Plan

Taken from M28, Part IV, Subpart iv, Chapter 9

December 29, 2006

(excerpts)

1. Guidelines for the Administration of an Independent Living Plan

Introduction

This topic provides guidelines for the administration of an independent living (IL) plan, including

- philosophical framework

- components of the philosophical framework, and standards of practice (SOP).

a. Philosophical Framework

The philosophical framework provides the principles which direct the scope and practice of utilizing the standards of practice for independent living (IL) plans.

b. Components of the Philosophical Framework

The philosophical framework is composed of the following nine principles.

- Enhance participation in activities of daily living (ADL)

- Assist the veteran in participating to the maximum extent possible and desirable in family and community life

- Provide the most effective services and assistive technology based on sound research evidence

- Provide required holistic evaluation and services for all veterans who qualify

- Develop rehabilitation plans that provide services to address all identified independent living needs

- Consider the veteran’s expressed interests and desires, but provide services based on objectively identified needs

- Establish goals and measure/verify outcomes

- Provide services that produce a sustaining influence that continues after rehabilitation services are completed, and

- Explore the possibility of paid or volunteer employment, when feasible.

c. SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) for the IL Plan

Step 1: Orient the veteran to the IL process. Assist the veteran in understanding rights and responsibilities in the IL process.

Step 2. Complete an IL evaluation and, if appropriate, develop an Individualized Independent Living Plan (IILP) which specifies services to address the identified needs.

Step 3. Provide IL services. Provide all services and assistance outlined in the rehabilitation plan. There should be an on-going holistic reassessment of IL needs in areas such as socialization, safety, health and fitness, personal life control, housing, hygiene, personal and family adjustment, mobility and transportation, legal, spiritual, financial, benefits, communication, cognitive, and meaningful activities.

Step 4. Concluding activities. Complete all necessary actions to determine whether the veteran has achieved rehabilitation. If rehabilitation will not be achieved, move the case to the appropriate case status.

*******************************

See below for more detail:

A. Orient the veteran to the IL process using VA Form 28-0786, VR&E Independent Living Program Orientation.

After a joint review

- the case manager and the veteran will sign VA Form 28-0786

- a copy of the signed form will be provided to the veteran, and

- the original form will be placed on the right side of the CER folder.

B. A preliminary evaluation of potential IL needs will be conducted by the case manager.

Concurrence by the VR&E Officer is needed when

-potential IL needs cannot be identified, and/or

- achievement of appropriate IL goals is not feasible.

If VR&E Officer does not concur, the counselor must work with the veteran to develop a plan of IL services.

If a plan of IL services is not developed

- prepare the case for closure in Discontinued status, and

- provide due process.

C. An assessment of all potential IL needs will be performed by a staff member or provider (e.g. IL Center) with specialized IL experience and/or training.

Concurrence by the VR&E Officer is needed when

- potential IL needs cannot be identified, and/or

- achievement of appropriate IL goals is not feasible.

If VR&E Officer does not concur, the counselor must work with the veteran to develop a plan of IL services.

If a plan of IL services is not developed

- prepare case for closure in Discontinued status, and

- provide due process.

D. Develop an Individualized Independent Living Plan (IILP) with objectives and services that address identified IL needs.

Ensure the objectives

- specifically address all identified IL needs

- include specific expected outcomes that are

-- measurable

-- verifiable, and

-- sustainable, and

- facilitate a successful outcome.

Obtain appropriate approval for program costs if they exceed $25,000 limit for case managers.

E. Submit the IILP and FL 28-520, IL Plan Approval Request, to the VR&E Officer for concurrence prior to any parties signing the plan or authorizing any IL services included in the plan.

If VR&E Officer approves the IL plan, the veteran and the case manager will review the plan and

- each sign VA Form 28-8872, Rehabilitation Plan

- a copy of the signed form will be provided to the veteran, and

- the original form will be placed on the right side of the CER folder.

F. Monitor veteran’s progress as needed throughout the IL process during face-to-face meetings (except when alternatives such as telephone, email, or mail may be necessary).

Supervision must occur at least once per month.

Discuss with the veteran any resulting concerns and take appropriate actions to address those concerns.

G. If additional and substantive potential IL issues are identified, complete another IL evaluation. A staff member or provider (e.g. IL Center) with specialized IL experience and/or training will perform this evaluation.

Develop an amended plan if the most recent IL evaluation identifies IL concerns that necessitate a major modification of the IILP.

Submit the new IILP to the VR&E Officer for concurrence.

H. If additional IL services beyond 24 months are required to meet the agreed upon IL goals, submit FL 28-521, IL Extension Request, to the VR&E Officer for an extension of six months or less.

I. Based on the results of plan implementation and provision of services, move the case to

- Rehabilitated status when

-- IILP outcomes have been demonstrated that substantiate attainment of the independent living goals, and

-- the veteran has achieved maximum independence in daily living

- Interrupted status when

-- there is a need to suspend services being provided under the veteran’s IL program, or

- Evaluation and Planning status when

-- a determination is made that achievement of a vocational goal may be feasible, or

-- there is a need to redevelop the plan, and

-- veteran reports for scheduled appointment.

*************************************

2. Required Documents for an Independent Living Plan

a. List of Documents for Independent Living Plans

Important: An asterisk “*” preceding the form name indicates the document is required when completing the IL process.

- *VA Form 28-0786, Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment (VR&E) Independent Living Program Orientation

Provides an orientation to the IL process, and includes information about

mission

goals

qualifying for IL services

types of services offered

case support, and

IL evaluation.

- *Preliminary IL Assessment – Guidance

Utilized to identify potential IL needs by examining

activities of daily living (ADL)

alcohol/substance abuse

housing and mobility needs,

personal, emotional, and spiritual needs, and

leisure/avocational activities.

- *VA Form 28-8872, Rehabilitation Plan

Outlines the services necessary to achieve independence in daily living.

- VA Form 28-0787, IL Needs Assessment and Planning Matrix

May be used during IL plan development to

assess veteran’s needs

identify service options, and

measure potential outcome(s).

- *FL 28-520, IL Plan Approval Request

Submitted to the VR&E Officer or designee to request concurrence of an IL plan.

- *Case Support – Guidance

Guidelines for monitoring services in an IL plan.

- *FL 28-521, Request for IL Extension

Submitted to the VR&E Officer or designee to request an extension to an IL plan.

- *Activities of Daily Living – Guidance

Utilized at the conclusion of an IL program to measure improvements in functioning and increased independence in daily living activities.

b. Instructions for Using Guidance Documents

When rating each activity on the guidance documents, Preliminary IL Assessment and Activities of Daily Living, utilize the rating system listed in the chart below.

Level of Activity—Rating

Usually did with no difficulty—4

Usually did with some difficulty—3

Usually did with help or assistive device—2

Usually did not do because of disabilities—1

Usually did not do for other reasons—0

Scores obtained when completing the Preliminary IL Assessment can be used to identify a veteran’s IL needs. Scores from Activities of Daily Living can be compared to the initial scores to assess and document the veteran’s progress.

****************************

References/Regulations

A. Orient the veteran…

Title 38, USC, Chapter 31

Section 3100 (Purposes), Section 3101 (Definitions), 3104 (Scope of services and assistance), 3120 (Program of independent living services and assistance)

38 CFR

21.76 (Independent living), 21.90 (Individualized independent living plan), 21.160 (Independent Living Services), 21.162 (Participation in a program of independent living services), 21.192 (“Independent living program” status), 21.310 (Rate of pursuit of an independent living program)

M28-1, Part II, Chapter 8, Change 7

Paragraph 8.01 (Introduction), 8.02 (Program Description), 8.04 (Scope of Services), 8.05 (Duration and Limitation of Services), 8.06 (Monetary Assistance), 8.07 (Travel), 8.08 (Procurement of Services), 8.12 (Individualized Independent Living Program), 28.IV.iii.5 (Evaluations for persons with TBI)

CRCC Code of Ethics

A-1, A-2, A-3, Section B, C-1, C-2, Section F

B. Preliminary evaluation of potential IL needs…

Title 38, USC, Chapter 31

Section 3101 (Definitions), 3104 (Scope of services and assistance), 3120 (Program of independent living services and assistance)

38 CFR

21.76 (Independent living), 21.90 (Individualized independent living plan), 21.162 (Participation in a program of independent living services)

M28-1, Part II, Chapter 8, Change 7

Paragraph 8.01 (Introduction), 8.10 (Role of the Counseling Psychologist), 8.12 (Individualized Independent Living Program)

28.IV.iv.2.E Vocational Rehabilitation Panel

CRCC Code of Ethics

A-1, A-2, A-3, Section B, C-1, C-2, F

C. Assessment of all potential IL….

Title 38, USC, Chapter 31

Section 3101 (Definitions), 3104 (Scope of services and assistance), 3120 (Program of independent living services and assistance)

38 CFR

21.76 (Independent living), 21.90 (Individualized independent living plan), 21.162 (Participation in a program of independent living services)

M28-1, Part II, Chapter 8, Change 7

Paragraph 8.01 (Introduction), 8.08 (Procurement of Services), 8.10 (Role of the Counseling Psychologist), 8.12 (Individualized Independent Living Program),

28.IV.iv.2.E Vocational Rehabilitation Panel

28.IV.iii.5 (Evaluations for persons with TBI)

CRCC Code of Ethics

A-1, A-2, A-3, Section B, C-1, C-2, F

D. Develop and Individualized Independent Living Plan (IILP)….

Title 38, USC, Chapter 31

Section 3101 (Definitions), 3104 (Scope of services and assistance), 3120 (Program of independent living services and assistance)

38 CFR

21.76 (Independent living), 21.90 (Individualized independent living plan), 21.162 (Participation in a program of independent living services)

M28-1, Part II, Chapter 8, Change 7

Paragraph 8.01 (Introduction), 8.08 (Procurement of Services), 8.10 (Role of the Counseling Psychologist), 8.12 (Individualized Independent Living Program),

28.IV.iv.2.E Vocational Rehabilitation Panel

28.IV.iii.5 (Evaluations for persons with TBI)

CRCC Code of Ethics

A-1, A-2, A-3, Section B, C-1, C-2, Section F

E. Submit the IILP….

Title 38, USC, Chapter 31

Section 3101 (Definitions)

38 CFR

21.162 (Participation in a program of independent living services)

F. Monitor veteran’s progress….

Title 38, USC, Chapter 31

Section 3100 (Purposes), Section 3101 (Definitions)

38 CFR

21.160 (Independent Living Services), 21.192 (“Independent living program” status)

M28-1, Part II, Chapter 8, Change 7

Paragraphs 8.04 (Scope of Services), 8.05 (Duration and Limitation of Services), 8.06 (Monetary Assistance), 8.08 (Procurement of Services), 8.12 (Individualized Independent Living Program)

Case Management Task Force Report

CRCC Code of Ethics A-2, B

G. If additional and substantive potential IL issues….

Title 38, USC, Chapter 31

Section 3101 (Definitions), 3104 (Scope of services and assistance), 3120 (Program of independent living services and assistance)

38 CFR

21.76 (Independent living), 21.90 (Individualized independent living plan), 21.162 (Participation in a program of independent living services)

M28-1, Part II, Chapter 8, Change 7

Paragraph 8.01 (Introduction), 8.08 (Procurement of Services), 8.10 (Role of the Counseling Psychologist), 8.12 (Individualized Independent Living Program),

28.IV.iv.2.E Vocational Rehabilitation Panel

28.IV.iii.5 (Evaluations for persons with TBI)

CRCC Code of Ethics

A-1, A-2, A-3, Section B, C-1, D-1, Section F

H. Services beyond 24 months

Title 38, USC, Chapter 31

Section 3101 (Definitions)

38 CFR

21.76 (Independent living)

I. Based on the results, move the case….

Title 38, USC, Chapter 31

Section 3100 (Purposes) Section 3101 (Definitions)

38 CFR

21.76 (Independent living), 21.90 (Individualized independent living plan, 21.192 (“Independent living program” status)

M28-1, Part II, Chapter 8, Change 7

Paragraph 8.01 (Introduction), 8.05 (Duration and Limitation of Services), 8.12 (Individualized Independent Living Program)

CRCC Code of Ethics

A-1, A-2, A-3, C-1, D-1, Section F

Title 38 Vocational Rehabilitation and Education

Looking over Title 38’s Part 21—VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Legal Stuff, I discovered a whole bunch of other possibilities to explore.

Having explored, I thought it would be easier for you (and me) to just post the link. This gives you the ability to read all parts of this document and maybe explore further as needed.

Sorry, people, could not get the direct link to work....

HOWEVER. Let's do a convoluted but working way for you to get the link......until someone more savvy can come along and connect it direct. Please? Someone?

Go to my website http://www.howtoassemblevaclaims.com/ and click on Step 3, Title 38. Click on that link and choose Parts 18-199, then choose 21 or 21.1 to 21.9770 for this section. From there click on the various areas as you explore.

Note that some of the links mention about getting “supplies.” Good to explore

21.156, 21.210, 21.212, 21.214, 21.216, 21.218, 21.219, 21.220, to mention a few

Read up on the plans that are required for evaluation.

21.80, 21.84, 21.86, 21.88, 21.90 (see also Reply #1), 21.92, 21.94, 21.96, 21.98

Then explore the others.

Get familiar with this document.

It pays to know what you are getting into before you do.

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M28 Part 2, Chapter 8 - Program of Independent Living Services

March 24, 1993 M28-1, Part II

Change 7

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 8. PROGRAM OF INDEPENDENT LIVING SERVICES

PARAGRAPH PAGE

8.01 Introduction 8-1

8.02 Program Description 8-1

8.03 Eligibility for Participation 8-2

8.04 Scope of Services 8-3

8.05 Duration and Limitation of Services 8-3

8.06 Monetary Assistance 8-4

8.07 Travel 8-5

8.08 Procurement of Services 8-6

8.09 VHAVR&C Linkage 8-8

8.10 Role of the Counseling Psychologist 8-9

8.11 Role of Vocational Rehabilitation Panel 8-10

8.12 Individualized Independent Living Program 8-11

8.13 Assignment of Case Status for Program Participants 8-12

8.14 Evaluations for Persons With TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) 8-12

Rescinded by M28.IV.iii, June 8, 2006

July 22, 1992 M28-1, Part II

Change 5

CHAPTER 8. PROGRAM OF INDEPENDENT LIVING SERVICES

8.01 INTRODUCTION

a. General. A veteran may have disabilities BO severe that achievement of a vocational goal is not currently reasonably feasible. VA may provide this veteran with IL (independent living) services. These services will help the veteran either to reach the point where a vocational goal is reasonably feasible, to reach the point where it may be reasonably feasible for the veteran to participate in an extended evaluation, or to become more independent in daily living within his or her family and community.

b. Authority. A program of IL Services and assistance is authorized under 38 CFR 21.162.

8.02. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

a. The Achievement of a Vocational Goal Is Not Currently Reasonably Feasible. To establish that it is not currently reasonably feasible for a veteran to achieve a vocational goal, a CP (counseling psychologist) must find that the veteran’s disabilities currently affect his or her employability to either of the following extents:

(1) The veteran cannot participate in a program of vocationally oriented training and services; or

(2) The veteran is able to successfully pursue vocational training, but it would be highly improbable for the veteran to obtain and retain employment consistent with his or her abilities, aptitudes, and interests.

b. Reasons for Authorizing a Program of IL Services. The VR&C (Vocational Rehabilitation and Counseling) Division may authorize a program of IL services for eligible veterans for whom achievement of a vocational goal is not currently reasonably feasible. This program of rehabilitation services may be furnished to help the veteran to

(1) Function more independently in his or her family and community without the assistance of others or with a reduced level of assistance from others;

(2) Become reasonably feasible for an extended evaluation; or

(3) Become reasonably feasible for a vocational rehabilitation program.

c. Independent Living and Independence in Daily Living. Independence in daily living means the ability of a veteran, either without the services of others or with a reduced level of those services, to live and function within the veteran’s family and community. Operationally, independent living is synonymous with independence in daily living.

d. Program of IL Services and Assistance. A program of IL services and assistance may include the following benefits:

(1) The services provided in 38 CFR 21.35(d), including the counseling, diagnostic, medical, social, psychological, and educational services which the CP determines the veteran needs to achieve maximum independence in daily living;

(2) The subsistence allowance and other monetary assistance authorized by 38 CFR 21.260, 21.262, 21.266, and 21.270; and

(3) The special rehabilitation services under 38 CFR 21.150, 21.152, 21.154, 21.155, and 21.156.

e. Barriers to Independent Living. The goal of an IL program is to increase the veteran’s options, resulting in an improved quality of life. options may be limited by skill deficits or by physical, environmental, or psychological factors. For example, some veterans may be able to overcome certain cognitive limitations through training intended to improve problem-solving. Some independent living program participants may need to learn how to manage personal care attendants, use adaptive equipment, and shop for necessities. For others, technological devices such as motorized wheelchairs or vehicle modifications may facilitate independent living. Supportive services, e.g., attendant care and health maintenance programs, may ameliorate the physical factors which increase the veteran’s dependence on others. Architectural modifications and advocacy to promote disabled persons, rights to barrier-free access may reduce environmental problems. Peer and professional counseling may decrease psychological hindrances to independence. A disabled veteran’s anxiety about discharge from an institution may diminish through interaction with other disabled persons who are successfully adjusting to community living.

f. Independent Living Services and the Rehabilitation Process. The goal of the IL program is not necessarily that the disabled veteran be able to live alone in the community with no supportive services. Rather, the goal is for that individual to have the skills necessary to choose an acceptable life-style and then be able to manage it with as little reliance on others as possible. in some instances, however, the veteran may require continuing services beyond completion of the IL program to maintain the level of independence achieved during the program. (See par. 8.05b below for limitations on these long-term services.)

8.03. ELIGIBILITY FOR PARTICIPATION

To be eligible for a program of IL services, VA must determine that

a. The veteran meets the basic eligibility and entitlement criteria for participation in a rehabilitation program;

b. Achievement of a vocational goal is not currently reasonably feasible;

c. The veteran has IL needs; and

d. The achievement of an IL goal is currently feasible; that is, VR&C staff members expect the IL services proposed will enable the veteran to live independently in his or her family and community or with reduced dependence upon the services of others.

8.04 SCOPE OF SERVICES

VA may provide a discrete service or a comprehensive program of services necessary to achieve maximum independence in daily living. As part of an IL program, the only vocational courses which VA may provide are those incidental to achieving intermediate IL objectives. Some of the IL services which VA may authorize are listed below:

a. Training in activities of daily living;

b. Training in IL skills;

c. Attendant care during a period of transition (see par. 8.05b below);

d. Transportation when special arrangements are required due to the disabling condition;

e. Peer counseling;

f. Evaluation or training in an IL program;

g. Housing (group, transitional, or housing specifically designed to meet the needs of disabled persons);

h. Advocacy; and

i. other services which 38 CFR 21.160 authorizes.

8.05 DURATION AND LIMITATION OF SERVICES

A program of IL services will not exceed the period necessary to restore independence in daily living. The duration of a program will not exceed 24 calendar months except as indicated in subparagraphs a and b below.

a. Extension for 6 Months. The CP may approve an extension of a program of IL services for up to 6 months if the additional period is necessary and should result in an increase in independence. The CP must carefully document in the veteran’s CER (Counseling/Evaluation/Rehabilitation) folder specifically how the additional services should lead to the desired results. No program may exceed 30 months.

b. Limitation of Selected Services. Some IL needs identified during the initial phase of program planning for a veteran may require services following completion of the program and, in some cases, for the rest of the veteran’s life. For example, the veteran might have a life-long need for a personal care attendant and for transportation assistance. Since the time a veteran can participate in the program is limited, program planning must focus on ways to meet these continuous needs following IL program participation. Vocational rehabilitation program funding for long-term needs is limited to the IL program period. During IL program participation the case manager will attempt to secure sources which will continue the assistance beyond the completion of the program. In no instance, however, may the VR&C Division provide these services beyond the maximum 30 months for an IL program.

c. Reentrance Following Rehabilitation and Discontinuance

(1) Reentrance Following a Determination of Rehabilitation. Under the conditions specified in 38 CFR 21.284(b), the CP may set aside a previous finding of rehabilitation following a program of independent living services and provide an additional period of independent living services.

(2) Reentrance Following Discontinuance. Under 38 CFR 21.76, a veteran discontinued from a program of independent living services may reapply (38 CFR 21.198©) and VA may authorize an additional period of up to 24 months of independent living services.

8.06 MONETARY ASSISTANCE

VA will pay subsistence allowance to a veteran in the IL program under 38 CFR 21.260.

a. Basis for Subsistence. Measure participation on a clock-hour basis. Pay subsistence allowance based on the number of clock hours spent in training directly related to the acquisition of IL skills—such as money management, personal care attendant management, and household maintenance. To measure the rate of pursuit, follow the instructions in 38 CFR 21.310(d).

(1) Reduced Work Tolerance. In view of the severity of the conditions of IL program participants, the CP must determine whether the veteran is entitled under reduced work tolerance (38 CFR 21.312) to a higher rate of subsistence allowance than VA would otherwise pay for a given level of participation.

(2) Limitations on Traditional Medical Therapies. Participation in traditional medical therapies (e.g., occupational therapy, psychotherapy, and physical therapy) will not typically be counted as training time although the case manager will document participation on the veteran’s VA Form 28-8872, Rehabilitation Plan.

b. Inpatient Status. VA may pay a subsistence allowance to veterans who are inpatients in a VA medical center or hospital at VA expense under 38 CFR 21.266 (a). The determination of rate of pursuit is the same as for veterans not hospitalized at a VA medical center.

c. Specialized Rehabilitation Facility. If the veteran is living in a specialized rehabilitation facility, VA can pay room and board expenses in lieu of basic subsistence allowance (38 CFR 21.266(b)). Even though VA pays the cost of room and board, the veteran will be paid the portion of subsistence allowance otherwise payable for dependents. For example, a veteran is entitled to subsistence allowance of $486, including $153 for dependents, but a decision has been make to have VA pay for room and board. The case manager would adjust the veteran’s award to withhold $333 and pay the remaining $153.

d. Bars to Payment of Subsistence Allowance. VA will not pay a subsistence allowance when a veteran participates at less than quarter time. When a veteran’s IILP (individualized independent living plan) provides for a period during which the veteran is receiving only supportive services and medical therapies, but no training, VA will not pay subsistence allowance under the IL program. This restriction includes periods during which the veteran is receiving only personal attendant care or a special transportation allowance.

e. Entitlement Usage and Program Length. VA will calculate charges against entitlement as for other chapter 31 programs measured in clock hours. In contrast, the VR&C Division will determine program duration (see par. 8.05 above) as the actual number of calendar months elapsed since the date the veteran first received services authorized on the IILP. This means, for example, that for a veteran who began receiving IL services at a half-time rate on January 3, 1987, and to whom the VA granted a 6-month extension, the IL program could not extend beyond July 2, 1989.

8.07 TRAVEL

a. Suitable Facility Not Locally Available. A suitable facility for the provision of IL services may not be available within the jurisdiction of the local regional office. In this case, VR&C staff members may apply the travel policies in 38 CFR 21.372 and the interregional transfer policies in part I, paragraph 13.02 if a suitable facility can be found outside the office’s jurisdiction and the veteran agrees to travel to that facility. When the nature of a veteran’s disability requires special travel accommodations, the VR&C Division should arrange for the payment of actual necessary travel expenses to the facility (see MP-1, pt. II, chs. 2 and 3).

b. Special Transportation Allowance. Under 38 CFR 21.154, VA may pay a special transportation allowance under a contractual agreement to a training facility or directly to a program participant if the participant has expenses commuting to the facility which a person without a disability would not need or incur. The CP will determine the need for a special transportation allowance. VA may pay for mileage, driver, parking fees, transportation furnished by the facility for its clients, and other valid expenses. The veteran must maintain a record of these costs. If VA will pay the transportation allowance directly to the veteran, the veteran will maintain a record of his or her transportation costs on Standard Form 1164, Claim for Reimbursement for Expenditures or Official Business. The case manager will certify the correctness of the claimed expenses and submit the form to the Finance Division for payment. VA will pay the lesser of the amounts under subparagraphs (1) and (2) below unless the veteran qualifies for the exception in subparagraph (3).

(1) Facility Provides Transportation. If the facility provides transportation which the veteran could reasonably use, but the veteran elects to travel by alternative means, VA will not pay more for transportation than the amount the facility charges other disabled persons for its transportation service.

(2) Maximum Payment Tied to Subsistence Allowance Rate. The maximum amount VA may pay for transportation expenses during any 1 month may not exceed one-half of the subsistence allowance for a single veteran at the full-time institutional rate or the actual cost, whichever is less.

(3) Exception. As an exception, VA may pay the full cost of extraordinary expenses—such as transportation by ambulance—which are essential to enable a veteran to pursue the program.

8.08. PROCUREMENT OF SERVICES

a. Authorization of Services and Supplies. The case manager will authorize the services, incidental goods, and supplies necessary for the veteran to accomplish the goals of an IL program. For these authorizations, the case manager will follow the policies and procedures in part III, chapters 2 and 6. If the case manager anticipates that program charges will require the approval of the Director, Vocational Rehabilitation Service, the regional office should follow the procedures in part II, chapter 3 to make a specific request to obtain approval of costs.

b. Approved Service Providers. Normally VR&C Divisions will use VA facilities to provide IL services to veterans participating in the program. If the VR&C Division cannot make timely, effective, and cost-efficient arrangements for VA facilities to provide these services, then the VR&C Division may follow the procedures described below and use other public, private nonprofit, and for-profit facilities.

(1) Use of VA Facilities. VA medical facilities are likely to be the best resources for VR&C Divisions to obtain authorized services as either part or all of an IILP. If these services are not available through VA medical facilities or the VR&C Division cannot make appropriate arrangements to timely use these facilities, the CP will document this in the veteran’s record:

(a) The record must summarize consultation with VHA (Veterans Health Administration) medical staff members concerning the need for medical, dental, and prosthetic services, including prosthetic aids, assistive devices, or medically related equipment. This requirement will be minimally met if a completed VA Form 28-8861, Request for Medical Services—Chapter 31, is in the veteran’s record. In item 11 of this form, the CP will identify the services requested and the questions to be answered by VHA staff members. The documentation must include the VHA response.

(b) The record must explain why a VA medical facility cannot provide or approve on a fee basis any needed nonmedical service. To document these reasons, the CP will use VA Form 28-1902b, Counseling Record Narrative Report, and, if needed, VA Form 28-1902n, Counseling Record Narrative Report (Supplemental Sheet). The VRS (vocational rehabilitation specialist) case manager will use VA Form 28-1905d, Special Report of Training.

(2) Use of For-profit and Nonprofit Facilities. VR&C Divisions may contract with other government, public, and private nonprofit and for-profit facilities or organizations to provide a program of IL services. VR&C Divisions may contract with for-profit agencies only if one of the following conditions is met:

(a) The VR&C Division cannot obtain comparable services through VA or other public and private nonprofit agencies; or

(b) The VR&C Division cannot obtain comparable services cost-effectively through VHA or other public or private nonprofit agencies.

c. Use of Consultants. VR&C staff members may use outside consultants to evaluate either a proposed program of services or an ongoing program to determine if the services proposed or being delivered will allow the veteran to reach the intended IL program goals.

(1) Use of Independent Contractors to Assess Services and Service Providers. If a VR&C Division contracts with an individual or facility, nonprofit or for-profit, to assess a veteran’s feasibility or needs for IL services, then the VR&C Division may not contract with that individual or facility to provide the recommended services. Similarly, an individual or facility under contract may assess the ability of IL service providers to cost-effectively provide a program of IL services for a particular veteran. The VR&C Division may not then award this individual or facility a contract to provide IL services to the veteran. These restrictions are designed to ensure an objective analysis of service needs and service providers.

(2) No Restriction on Services to Other Veterans. Even if an individual or facility assesses a veteran’s IL needs or the ability of service providers to support a veteran’s IL program, the VR&C Division may still contract with the assessor to provide IL services to chapter 31 participants other than the veteran for whom the assessment was made.

(3) Sole Source Providers. Veterans may live in an area which contains only one IL service provider. In these cases, either the VR&C Division, another VA or governmental agency, or a contractor from outside the area must perform the assessment of the veteran’s needs and the ability of the sole local service provider to deliver the needed services. Non-VR&C assessors must clearly establish that they have the expertise and experience in IL and the disabilities which cause the need for IL services. For veterans in these sole source situations, the needs assessment must also contain an analysis of the veteran’s ability to transfer to another area to receive IL services.

d. Contracting for IL Services. To contract for services provided by institutions as part of or the whole of an IL plan, VR&C staff members will follow the procedures described in part III, paragraph 2.02.

e. Use of Individual Instructors. Approved institutional service providers discussed in subparagraph d above, and not individual instructors, will usually provide the services detailed on the IILP. VA may use qualified individual instructors, however, when necessary in either of the following instances:

(1) To provide services incidental to the total IL program if the instructors are under contract to an approved service provider, or

(2) To provide a discrete service or services which VR&C staff members personally supervise. The service or services must be incidental to a total IL program. To approve this individual instruction, VR&C staff members must follow the procedures provided in Part III, paragraph 2.02.

8.09 VHAVR&C LINKAGE

a. Referrals From VHA. if VHA staff members identify a veteran for possible participation in the IL program, they will refer the case to the VR&C Officer in the regional office of jurisdiction. VHA staff members should obtain a completed VA Form 28-1900, Disabled Veterans Application for Vocational Rehabilitation, and supporting medical evidence. This documentation should accompany the referral.

b. Coordination With VHA. If a veteran is receiving care in a VHA facility or it is anticipated that he or she will need VHA services, the CP must consult with appropriate VHA staff members during the development of the IILP to assure that VA formulates a single, coordinated plan for the veteran. The CP will forward a copy of the completed plan and all subsequent redevelopments of the plan to these VHA staff members.

8.10 ROLE OF THE COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGIST

a. Identification of Veterans. The CP must review each case in which a vocational goal is not currently reasonably feasible to determine if a program of IL services may be furnished for one of the reasons in subparagraph 8.02b above. if an IL program is feasible, the CP and the veteran must then develop a program of IL services that addresses the veteran’s needs. If a VRS will act as case manager, the VRS will also take part in the plan development (see subpar. 8.12b(1) for detailed instructions on who will act as case manager for IL programs).

b. Provision of IL Services When a Vocational Goal Is Feasible. When establishing a veteran’s entitlement to services under chapter 31, the CP must document in the CER folder why the achievement of a vocational goal is not currently reasonably feasible. If vocational rehabilitation is currently reasonably feasible, but the veteran is prevented from participating in a traditional vocational rehabilitation program due to deficient IL skills, the CP should integrate the needed IL services into an IWRP (individualized written rehabilitation plan). The case manager will arrange for these services as a preliminary part of the plan or concurrently with educational or vocational services.

c. Determination of Feasibility for Program of IL Services. In evaluating clients for inclusion in the program of IL services, the CP must determine that it is reasonable to expect an increase in the veteran’s level of independent functioning if the veteran receives these services.

(1) Documentation of the IL feasibility determination must be clearly evident in the record of each veteran for whom an IL program is provided.

(2) Outside consultants and the VRP (Vocational Rehabilitation Panel) are recommended for use as the providers of data to support the IL feasibility determination (see subpar. 8.08c above for details concerning the use of an outside consultant, and par. 8.11 below for use of VRP).

(3) When using an outside consultant or the VRP, the CP must assure that either resource has the expertise to address the needs of the veteran under consideration.

d. Denial of IL Services. If the CP determines that the achievement of a vocational goal is not currently reasonably feasible and the CP does not approve a program of IL services, the CP must obtain the VR&C Officer’s concurrence in the decision (21 CFR 21.53(f)). If the VR&C Officer does not concur, the CP must work with the VRS case manager and the veteran to develop a plan of IL services.

8.11 ROLE OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PANEL

a. Use of the VRP. The CP may refer IL cases to the VRP on a voluntary basis for technical and consultation services (see 38 CFR 21.62). The VRP may be of particular assistance in helping the CP determine whether the veteran meets the following program participation criteria:

(1) The achievement of a vocational goal currently is not reasonably

feasible;

(2) The veteran exhibits the potential for IL services to cause a favorable change in critical functions—for example, mobility, self-care, and communication—which will most likely result in a positive change in eliminating or reducing the veteran’s dependence on others;

(3) The veteran possesses the physical, emotional, and intellectual capacity or potential to carry out the demands of an IL program;

(4) Any deterioration of the veteran’s disability is not significantly more rapid than the rehabilitation process; and

(5) The veteran is motivated to achieve IL goals.

b. Referral to VRP. For each veteran referred to the VRP for program consideration, the CP will prepare a memorandum through the VR&C Officer to the chairperson of the VRP. This memorandum will contain the following information:

(1) A summary of pertinent medical history, including a clear description of the veteran’s present functional limitations and strengths;

(2) A statement describing the bases for previous CP determinations that a vocational goal was not currently reasonably feasible;

(3) A statement of the veteran’s present IL needs;

(4) The specific IL objectives to be achieved while the veteran is a program participant as well as the potential service resources to reach those objectives; and

(5) other facts, observations, or opinions which may assist the VRP.

c. Vocational Rehabilitation Panel’s Recommendations. The CP will consider the VRP’s recommendations as expert technical assistance to facilitate effective decisionmaking and rehabilitation planning. Recommendations and suggestions by the VRP are not binding, but the CP may not disregard them without thorough consideration and documentation.

March 24, 1993 M28-1, Part II

Change 7

(1) Recommendation for Program of IL Services. After evaluating the referral, if the VRP finds that an IL goal is currently reasonably feasible for the veteran, the VRP will recommend the veteran’s inclusion in the program. The VRP may also recommend specific IL objectives and services for the CP to include in the IILP.

(2) Negative Recommendation. If the VRP finds that an IL goal is not currently reasonably feasible, the VRP will recommend that the VR&C Division not place the veteran in the program. Whenever possible following a negative recommendation, the VRP will suggest an integrated set of activities and services to improve the veteran’s condition so that later entry into the IL program may become feasible.

(3) Additional Information Needed. If the VRP needs additional information to make a recommendation regarding the feasibility of a program of IL services, the VRP may return the case to the CP and request development.

8.12 INDIVIDUALIZED INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM

a. Development of IILP. The IILP facilitates a team approach in planning, coordinating, and implementing an interdisciplinary program of resources and services. Whenever appropriate, the CP will consult with the VRP and other rehabilitation personnel in developing the plan. Consequently, the IILP will organize and synthesize the information developed in the initial evaluation and any extended evaluation with the recommendations of the VRP and other rehabilitation professionals. The CP has primary responsibility for the formulation of the plan. Development of the IILP will follow the procedures for preparing an IWRP.

b. Implementation and Periodic Review of IILP

(1) Case Management Responsibilities. Normally, the CP is responsible for case management in implementing the IILP and monitoring the veteran’s progress. The CP will apply the basic procedures for providing assistance to the veteran and supervising the rehabilitation program to ensure timely implementation of the plan’s objectives. If using CPs as case managers for IL programs disrupts or delays delivery of services to other chapter 31 participants, the VR&C Officer may assign this IL role to a VRS. When a VRS is assigned an IL case, a CP should be available for consultation.

(2) Plan and Progress Reviews. The case manager and the veteran will review and evaluate the plan and the veteran’s progress toward the program goal as often as necessary—but at least once every 6 months—following the procedures and schedules outlined in the IILP for each objective. The case manager may use an outside consultant to assist in assessing this progress. On the basis of these reviews, the CP will determine whether to redevelop, amend, or retain the present plan.

c. Veteran’s Involvement

(1) IILP Development. The CP will solicit the veteran’s cooperation in negotiating and agreeing to the terms of the IILP. When the CP and the veteran have developed, agreed to, and documented the plan’s substantive terms, the CP and the veteran will sign the plan to indicate mutual understanding and acceptance of the terms. Unless a VRS will assume case management responsibilities, there will be only two signatures on the IILP. The veteran will receive a copy of the signed plan.

(2) Disagreement About Terms of IILP. If the CP and veteran cannot agree on the terms of the plan, the CP will request that the VR&C Officer review the proposed plan. The VR&C Officer will resolve the disagreement and ensure that plan development continues.

(3) Rights of Review and Appeal. The veteran or his or her representative may request administrative review of a proposed original or amended rehabilitation plan (see pt. I, par. 3.05). Within 1 year of written notification of the CP’s decision regarding the veteran’s plan, the veteran or his or her representative may appeal the terms of the proposed plan to BVA (Board of Veterans Appeals) by filing a notice of disagreement (see pt. I, ch. 10). VR&C staff members will inform the veteran that any administrative review must take place prior to appealing the decision to BVA. Once the veteran files a notice of disagreement, the VR&C Officer must immediately stop any administrative review in progress and begin appellate processing.

8.13 ASSIGNMENT OF CASE STATUS FOR PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS

For instructions regarding case status assignment of IL program participants, see part I, chapter 7.

8.14 EVALUATIONS FOR PERSONS WITH TBI (TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY)

Rescinded by M28.IV.iii, June 8, 2006

APPENDIX 8A

Directory of Rehabilitation Medicine Services

That Will Provide TBI Evaluations

for Chapter 31 Participants

VAMC RMS CONTACT* FTS NUMBER

1. Albany, NY Dr. Emma Aliwalis, Chief 641-2416

2. Albuquerque, NM Dr. Charles Kunkel, Chief 572-7015

3. Boston, MA Dr. Kyung-Ae Hahn, Chief 839-4981

4. Dallas, TX Dr. Kenneth Cole, Chief 749-5351

5. Chicago, IL (Hines) Mr. Robert Massey, Coordinator 381-4912

6. Houston, TX Dr. Trilok N. Nonga, Chief 528-7117

7. Knoxville, IA Mr. Andrew Hazer, Coordinator 861-5015

8. Long Beach, CA Mr. Jack Tomich, Coordinator 966-5958

9. Memphis, TN Mr. Glenn Ramsey, Coordinator 222-5381

10. Milwaukee, WI Dr. Mary Mantione, Chief 363-1103

11. Minneapolis, MN Ms. Deborah Monickon, RN 780-3566

12. Northport, NY Mr. Dennis Lawn, Coordinator 663-7198

13. Palo Alto, CA Dr. Elaine Date, Chief 463-5469

14. San Juan, PR Dr. Benigno Fernandez, Chief 804-766-6533

15. Seattle, WA Dr. Eugen M. Halar, Chief 396-2222

16. Tampa, FL Mr. John Strugar, Coordinator 822-6069

*The RMS contacts on this list will likely change. In the event someone on the list is not available, contact the Chief, RMS.

App. 8A- 1

Beginning of 38 USC Section 31, Title 38, Part III...3100, 3101, 3102 excerpts

38 USC Sec. 3100 02/01/2010

TITLE 38 - VETERANS' BENEFITS

PART III - READJUSTMENT AND RELATED BENEFITS

CHAPTER 31 - TRAINING AND REHABILITATION FOR VETERANS WITH SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITIES

Sec. 3100. Purposes

The purposes of this chapter are to provide for all services and assistance necessary to enable veterans with service-connected disabilities to achieve maximumindependence in daily living and, to the maximum extent feasible, to become employable and to obtain and maintain suitable employment.

************************************

38 USC Sec. 3101 02/01/2010

TITLE 38 - VETERANS' BENEFITS

PART III - READJUSTMENT AND RELATED BENEFITS

CHAPTER 31 - TRAINING AND REHABILITATION FOR VETERANS WITH SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITIES

Sec. 3101. Definitions

For the purposes of this chapter -

(2) The term "independence in daily living" means the ability of a veteran, without the services of others or with a reduced level of the services of others, to live and function within such veteran's family and community.

(4) The term "program of independent living services and assistance" includes (A) the services provided for in this chapter that are needed to enable a veteran to achieve independence in daily living, including such counseling, diagnostic, medical, social, psychological, and educational services as are determined by the Secretary to be needed for such veteran to achieve maximum independence in daily living, and (B) the assistance authorized by this chapter for such veteran.

(6) The term "rehabilitation program" means

(A) a vocational rehabilitation program, or

(B) a program of independent living services and assistance authorized under section 3120 of this title for a veteran for whom a vocational goal has been determined not to be currently reasonably feasible.

(9) The term "vocational rehabilitation program" includes -

(A) the services provided for in this chapter that are needed for the accomplishment of the purposes of this chapter, including such counseling, diagnostic, medical, social, psychological, independent living, economic, educational, vocational, and employment services as are determined by the Secretary to be needed -

(i) in the case of a veteran for whom the achievement of a vocational goal has not been determined not to be currently reasonably feasible, (I) to determine whether a vocational goal is reasonably feasible, (II) to improve such veteran's potential to participate in a program of services designed to achieve a vocational goal, and (III) to enable such veteran to achieve maximum independence in daily living, and

(ii) in the case of a veteran for whom the achievement of a vocational goal is determined to be reasonably feasible, to enable such veteran to become, to the maximum extent feasible, employable and to obtain and maintain suitable employment, and

(B) the assistance authorized by this chapter for a veteran receiving any of the services described in clause (A) of this paragraph.

************************************

38 USC Sec. 3102 02/01/2010

TITLE 38 - VETERANS' BENEFITS

PART III - READJUSTMENT AND RELATED BENEFITS

CHAPTER 31 - TRAINING AND REHABILITATION FOR VETERANS WITH SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITIES

Sec. 3102. Basic entitlement

A person shall be entitled to a rehabilitation program under the terms and conditions of this chapter if -

(1) the person -

(A) is -

(i) a veteran who has a service-connected disability rated at 20 percent or more which was incurred or aggravated in service on or after September 16, 1940; or

(ii) hospitalized or receiving outpatient medical care, services, or treatment for a service-connected disability pending discharge from the active military, naval, or air service, and the Secretary determines that -

(I) the hospital (or other medical facility) providing the hospitalization, care, services, or treatment is doing so under contract or agreement with the Secretary concerned, or is under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of Veterans Affairs or the Secretary concerned; and

(II) the person is suffering from a disability which will likely be compensable at a rate of 20 percent or more under chapter 11 of this title; and

(B) is determined by the Secretary to be in need of rehabilitation because of an employment handicap; or

(2) the person is a veteran who -

(A) has a service-connected disability rated at 10 percent which was incurred or aggravated in service on or after September 16, 1940; and

(B) is determined by the Secretary to be in need of rehabilitation because of a serious employment handicap.

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FORMS USED FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM

VA FORM 28-0786 ILP Orientation

(NOTE FROM FB: Unable to find this form to post)

VA FORM 28-0787 IL Needs Assessment & Planning Matrix

(NOTE FROM FB: Unable to find this form to post)

VA FORM 28-1905m (Aug 2008) is the currnt form for REQUEST OF SUPPLIES (Chapter 31 Vocational Rehab

(NOTE FROM FB: Form can be found on Forms site at the VA.

FL 28-520 Is the ILP Plan Approval Request (same form for requesting an extension)

(NOTE FROM FB: Unable to find this form to post)

VA FORM 28-521 IL Extension Request

(NOTE FROM FB: Unable to find this form to post)

VA FORM 28-8872 Is the actual planning form.

(NOTE FROM FB: Form can be found on Forms site at the VA.

I also found

VA FORM 28-1902w Rehabilitation Needs Inventory (RNI) (Fillable)

VA FORM 28-1900. Disabled Veterans Application for Vocational Rehabilitation (Fillable)

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Solicitation (2007) for Independent Living Skills Assessment

While doing research on the Independent Living Program, I came across a Solicitation for finding a vendor to do Independent Living Skills Assessments. Now this is an old solicitation (2007), but upon looking this solicitation over, I discovered a number of areas that might help a veteran as he/she begins to explore this area of the VA.

I think it will not be necessary to explain since it is pretty straightforward as to what the vendor’s duties and training will be.

However, I will include links or explanations for the tests mentioned of which a vendor must have knowledge. Some of the test explanations I had trouble finding, so chose what was available.

*********************

Taken from Solicitation, Number VA-316-07-RQ-0001

1. BACKGROUND.

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Atlanta Regional Office, Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) office, Chapter 31 has a requirement for a vendor to provide

Independent Living Skills Assessment.

2. SCOPE.

The vendor shall provide Independent Living Skills Assessment for veterans referred by the Atlanta Regional Office and out-based offices located in Augusta, Savannah, Tifton, and Columbus.

Independent Living services shall be provided in accordance with the VA, VR&E regulation, Circular 28-05-01 and any additional guidance provided by the VA VR&E Central Office.

The assessments shall include the following:

2.1.1 Overview of the individual's current level of functioning regarding independent living skills. Summary of interview, records review, tests administered, and test results.

2.1.3 Assistance in identifying the most reasonable and cost effective services, products, or activities to increase the individual's level of independence in their home and community.

Recommendations for services, products or activities that are available to assist the individual to increase their level of independence in the home and community.

2.2 The vendor shall utilize a variety of methods to assess the individual's independent living skills, including review of available medical records, interview with the individual and/or family, testing, and a visit to the individual's home or community, depending upon the needs of the particular individual.

2.3 The vendor will receive referrals under a Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA) for the period April 3, 2007 - September 30, 2007 with three one-year option periods.

2.4 The following services will be billed at the flat hourly rate.

Medical records review,

Time with the individual for interview,

Time spent researching community resources,

Travel time to and from clients home or out-based offices, if applicable,

Report writing.

The time spent reviewing medical records may vary depending upon the extent of the medical records to be reviewed, and time spent during an interview may vary with each individual depending upon their disability issues.

However, average times spent are typically

one hour for interview with each individual,

one hour for medical records review,

one to two hours for researching resources in the veteran's community and

two to three hours for report writing.

Travel will be billed at the flat hourly rate, with no additional associated per mile fees.

All work times shall be pro-rated and charged for only the actual time incurred while performing the tasks.

Wait time, up to one hour, is billable at the flat hourly rate.

2.5 The following tests shall be administered, only as needed, and pricing for each test shall include administering, scoring and for the cost of the test:

- Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test

http://www.personality-and-aptitude-career-tests.com/kaufman-brief-intelligence-test.html

- Wide Range Achievement Test 3

http://www.minddisorders.com/Py-Z/Wide-Range-Achievement-Test.html

- Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, III

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peabody_Picture_Vocabulary_Test

- Purdue Pegboard

http://ezinearticles.com/?Purdue-Pegboard-Manual-Dexterity-Test&id=3728162

- Myers Briggs Personality Type Indicator

http://www.myersbriggs.org/my%2Dmbti%2Dpersonality%2Dtype/mbti%2Dbasics/

- Career Decision Making System

http://www.schoolcounselor.org/files/6-4-280%20OShea.pdf

- Revised Beck Depression Inventory

http://www.minddisorders.com/A-Br/Beck-Depression-Inventory.html

- McCarron Assessment of Neuromuscular Development;

http://www.abledata.com/abledata.cfm?pageid=113583&top=0&productid=190840&trail=0

[I couldn’t find much on the above, but since this described what was included, I felt it might help show what an assessor might use.]

[The next four are taken from one site. It is all I could find and since my computer left pictures in the middle of the words, I have pulled the words out and placed them under the specific test.]

http://www.jackdial.com/clinic/cves/indexcvesdescrpt.html

- Emotional Behavioral Checklist

[The EBC is a scale designed to assess the same factors of emotional 
behavior included in the OEI-R (Impulsivity-Frustration, Anxiety, 
Depression-Withdrawal, Socialization, Self-Concept, Aggression,
and Reality Disorientation). This instrument is highly correlated 
with the OEI-R (r = .92), but is a shorter form and does not require 
an extensive observation period. The EBC can be used in clinical and 
school settings as well as in rehabilitation facilities.]

- Cognitive Test for the Blind

[The CTB is the primary CVES measure of cognitive,
intellectual and information processing skills. It differs from the WAIS-III in that it focuses 
on active problem solving, learning and memory. The CTB consists of a Verbal scale 
and a non-visual Performance scale from which a Total standard score is derived 
(mean = 100; standard deviation = 15). Test-retest reliability of the Verbal scales
revealed a correlation of .96.]

- Haptic Sensory Discrimination Test;

[The HSDT is used in assessing tactile-matching skills, short-term haptic 
memory and spatial localization skills in the visually-impaired/blind population.
Tactile discrimination involves the manipulation of objects in the hand to discriminate 
their particular shape, size, texture and spatial arrangement and to conceptually
integrate these sensations to form an accurate mental representation of the 
total object. Geometrically shaped and textured objects are obscured from the 
visual field and manipulated in one hand. The individual is asked to remember
what is felt and to locate an identical object with the same hand from among 
various choices. Initial Studies of the reliability of the HSDT reveal relatively
high results (r = 92). Tactile-memory performance on both sides of the body 
correlates to educational and vocational potential.]

- Functional Survey of Adaptive Behavior.

[The Integration-Coping factor is measured by the SFAB. Integration-

Coping is defined as the individual's knowledge and skills related
to activities of daily living, personal-social, and work adjustment.

As such, it is a global factor which encompasses many aspects of
functional adaptive behavior.

The SFAB can be completed from
history and interview but has increased reliability and validity when 
opportunities for extended behavioral observation are available.

The SFAB also has further utility for developing individual program
plans in public school or rehabilitation settings.

The SFAB is a comprehensive rating scale of adaptive behavior.
It includes 135 specific behavioral items covering four major 
skill areas: Residential Living Skills; Daily Living Skills; Academic
Skills; and Vocational Skills.

Each of the major skill areas is further subdivided into the following: 
Personal Management; Home Management; Functional Skills;
Community Services; Travel Skills; Numerical Reasoning and
Mathematics; Functional Language, Literacy and Writing;
Physical Abilities; and Vocational Behaviors.

PM - This section includes 15 items relating to basic self-care 
and hygiene, dressing and grooming, and personal health care and safety.

HM - This section includes 15 items relating to clothing care,
general household duties, kitchen and food preparation.

FS - This area includes 20 items relating to money, financial
management, time orientation and management, and use of the
telephone.

CS- This section includes 10 items associated with knowledge 
and access of public services and social/recreational resources.

TS - This area assesses 10 behaviors required in successful 
orientation and mobility.

NRM- This section includes 10 items relating to numerical reasoning, 
mathematics and weights and measures.

FL- This area includes 10 items to assess receptive and expressive 
language.

VB- This section includes 20 items descriptive of work adjustment.]

3. TASKS.

3.1 Referrals will be made from the VA counselor to the vendor by telephone or email.

3.2 The vendor shall contact the individual and determine the needs for the assessment.

The vendor shall then provide the VA counselor with recommendations and a cost estimate for services by email.

This will be an itemized estimate detailing the anticipated number of hours required for professional services and any travel.

3.3 The counselor will prepare the appropriate task order (authorization) using VA Form 28-1905 and attach the approved original or amended estimate.

The original will be provided to the vendor by regular mail.

Advance, unofficial copies may be emailed in order to expedite scheduling and initiation of services to the veteran.

3.4 If it is determined that more time or testing is needed to complete the assessment, the vendor shall consult with the referring counselor.

If approved, the referring counselor will prepare an addendum to the original task order by completing another VA Form 28-1905 task order authorizing the additional time and charges.

The task order will be distributed in the same manner as in item 3 above.

3.5 Once the assessment is completed, the vendor shall submit a written report of the assessment and provide recommendations to the referring counselor.

The report and vendor invoice shall be submitted together along with a copy of the original and subsequent VA Form 28-1905 task order(s).

Invoices must clearly reference the vendor's invoice number, Federal Tax ID number, the Blanket Purchase Agreement number, the veteran's name and VA claim number, and a complete itemization of the services provided, service dates, and charges.

3.6 Three to six months following the independent living needs assessment, a follow-up assessment may be authorized by the referring counselor.

The follow-up assessment is to determine the individual's progress with the independent living plan.

The average estimate for the follow-up is

one to two hours for the interview with the individual,

one hour follow-up with community resources (volunteer position supervisors) when appropriate, and

one to two hours report writing to summarize the current status.

Travel time and all follow-up services shall be billed at the flat hourly rate.

4. CONTRACTOR EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENTS.

The contractor is responsible for providing the appropriate staffing to meet the requirements of this SOW.

The minimum contractor qualifications are a Master's degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and specialized past performance and experience in independent living skills assessment working with disabled veteran population.

5. Place of Performance: Various locations throughout the state of Georgia.

6. Contract Type: Referrals will be made under a Blanket Purchase Agreement under FAR 13.303-1. The estimated number of labor hours for the base period is 350 hours and 700 hours for each option year. Services shall be invoiced at a fixed price hourly rate.

7. Travel:

The contractor shall travel on an as need basis to support the execution of the requirements in this Statement of Work and as directed by the referring counselor.

Travel will be billed at the fixed price hourly rate.

8. Quality Assurance Plan: The government will use a variety of methods to monitor performance of this contract to include customer surveys, customer feedback and Government Quality Review forms.

The government deems acceptable performance as no more than one valid negative response per referral with no more than one late report per referral.

9. References: VA Circular 28-05-01 located at www.warms.vba.va.gov/28circulars.html.

The government will use Lowest Price Technically Acceptable (LPTA) source selection process.

The government considers technical acceptability as a contractor

personnel with a Master's Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling,

acceptable past performance/experience in Independent Living Skills Assessments and experience working with disabled veteran population.

A resume(s) of key personnel shall be submitted with your quote.

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