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High Blood Pressure Comp. Question


KennyJ

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I am planning on filing a claim for high blood pressure with my VARO. I was discharged in 1984 and I have my entire Service Medical records. In my records I must have went to sickbay about 50 times in the 3 years I was in. I thought it was standard procedure for BP checks at every visit to sickbay. There was only 3 times that they documented BP readings on these visits. I see the place on the sheets for BP,pulse and temperature but they never took them, not even before discharge. Who would the burden of proof be on as far as Service connection if I file this claim.

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A lot will depend on your readings when you were in. If they give you an exam where you are laying down and take your blood pressure 3 times, 1/2 hour apart and it indicates hypertension and they are vary close to your medical service bp, they "should" (and I would fight them on it) assume that more likely than not that it existed prior to departure from service. As they cannot dispell it, the regulations state that the benefit of the doubt will be awarded to the veteran. However, they will only monetarily retro your claim to the date you submit it, so I wouldn't waste any time. I would make a point of getting to the VA or using a local doctor using the VA guidelines.

The pressure shall be taken 3 times, 1/2 hour apart, alternating arms, for 3 consecutive days. As it is an actual physician, the raters can not dispute the findings.

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Guest jstacy

Kenny, Hypertension in service can be based on medical records that were available. The Burden of proof is still on the Veteran to prove it. What were the readings taken in the Military if you dont mind disclosing them.

Hypertension is also covered uder presumptive conditions. If you were diagnosed with hypertension with the top line ( Systolic) at 160 or bottom line ( Diastolic at 100 or higher) then it can be service connected. If it is less than the chances are probally remote. The diagnosis must be within the first year of separation and must have been taken 2 or more times on 3 different days.

Here is the regulation=== 7101 Hypertensive vascular disease (hypertension and isolated

systolic hypertension):

Diastolic pressure predominantly 130 or more................ 60

Diastolic pressure predominantly 120 or more................ 40

Diastolic pressure predominantly 110 or more, or; systolic 20

pressure predominantly 200 or more.........................

Diastolic pressure predominantly 100 or more, or; systolic 10

pressure predominantly 160 or more, or; minimum evaluation

for an individual with a history of diastolic pressure

predominantly 100 or more who requires continuous

medication for control.....................................

Note (1): Hypertension or isolated systolic hypertension must be

confirmed by readings taken two or more times on at least three

different days. For purposes of this section, the term

hypertension means that the diastolic blood pressure is

predominantly 90mm. or greater, and isolated systolic

hypertension means that the systolic blood pressure is

predominantly 160mm. or greater with a diastolic blood pressure

Edited by jstacy
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Guest frank
I am planning on filing a claim for high blood pressure with my VARO. I was discharged in 1984 and I have my entire Service Medical records. In my records I must have went to sickbay about 50 times in the 3 years I was in. I thought it was standard procedure for BP checks at every visit to sickbay. There was only 3 times that they documented BP readings on these visits. I see the place on the sheets for BP,pulse and temperature but they never took them, not even before discharge. Who would the burden of proof be on as far as Service connection if I file this claim.
kenny, i think that would be hard to prove,why did you go to sickbay for?maybe you could tie that toghter frank
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Were you ever prescribed medication for hypertension in-service, and if so, is there evidence of that prescription in your SMR's? Or, were you ever prescribed medication for another condition whereby an increase in blood pressure was a possible side effect?

My husband's records did not contain the word "hypertension" in them, however from the readings he had and the medicine prescribed, the condition was otherwise indicated.

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From the experience we had with my husbands claim, hypertension is a very hard claim to get approved. According to my husband, when you are in the middle of a war and you get hurt or are sick, you go to sick bay and they only do whatever is necessary to treat you and get you back to your assigned duty to fight. Taking your blood pressure seemed non-existent. Not once in my husbands records did a record of his blood pressure ever show up and being taken. I looked at his entrance exam. His blood pressure was taken and it was normal. On his separation exam, it showed his blood pressure was elevated, but the word "hypertension" was not shown. He even told me that they held him for a while and took his blood pressure 3 or 4 times to get a reading they felt was acceptable to discharge him. He started seeing a doctor shortly after being released from the military and was started on medication for his blood pressure and has been on it ever since. He did have early medical records showing treatment of hypertension.

We were denied several times at the RO. Even though they stated the separation papers did show an elevated level, the diagnosis of hypertension was not listed. We ended up at the BVA level and this was remanded back to the RO. Another C & P was done and we finally got a statement from the examiner that it was at least likely as not that his hypertension was due to his military service. I think this is what it took in order to him to get his hypertension S/C, but at 0%. Due to the fact that he is being treated with medication and his HBP is for the most part under control, this resulted in the 0%. But, it is at least S/C in the event, God forbid, he passes away due to a health problem related to his HBP.

Not sure if our experience will help anyone else, but it doesn't hurt to know what others go through in working their individual claim.

mssoup1

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Guest jstacy

The military often purges records when the Vet separates. In My case the Blood Pressure readings were discarded and summarized on a summary page. The only thing in my record was listed were conditions.

It stated HTN and Tension H/A. The HTN held up for a Diagnosis of Hypetension and the H/A stood up for a Headache condition which the VARO did not even consider in the original claim. They stated the records were negative for those conditions. After reviewing the C File, and seeing this information I was a little ticked off and immediatly filed a Cue Claim. I also submitted documantation of a Diagnosis of HTN with several compensable readings within the first post service year.

Hypertension ratings are yo-yo ratings for the VA monitors them and adjusts compensation accordingly.

I have seen it yo- yo from 30 percent to 10 percent. The BVA is full of appeals from lowered ratings.

For success the best advice I can give anyone is to physically go and review your Claims folder.

Once a Veteran does that allot of Doors can be opened.

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Good point- I had a local vet who looked for HBP in his SMRs-and brought them over-

but it was HTN-and I found many readings in his SMRS that proved his inservice HTN-

a good medical abbreviation reference can work wonders-

A VA "expert" doc questioned my take on the meanings of some VA med abbreviations-

I knocked that "expert" down in a heartbeat with references to Medi-lexicon-

I won a FTCA claim by doing that-didnt know what R/O CAD meant- I sure do now-

Also-I was puzzled that there was a notation of DVD in my husband's records.

I was trying to prove he had diabetes and it was misdiagnosed.

Medi Lexicon was my source- DVD- diabetic vascular disease-

I am glad you brought this up-using a good on line source to interpret medical abbreviations in your files can help a claim succeed! I have my own award letters to prove that. Berta

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