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14 Months And Still Gathering Evidence?


beautygirlsmom

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I just want to say how much I admire all of you who are so patient in working with the VA to see your claim through. And I thank you all for the incredibly valuable information you have provided people like me, struggling to figure this whole thing out - especially the time frames.

I just don't know how to deal with the frustration. My husband has a BVA Field Rep who NEVER calls us back (we're waiting up to a month for a call back on our last call, and the time before that, we never got a call back until we called the national office). He told us back on December 1st that my husband was "going for a rating". Every time we check the eBenefits, it tells us they are "gathering evidence".

We've hand delivered documentation, we've faxed and mailed multitudes of copies of things, and even though I know that I personally handed paperwork over to the BVA Field Rep, it still shows online as documents that they haven't received.

You guys all have nerves of steel. To add to the frustration, there are two guys at my husband's PTSD support group who claim they were rated within 3 months. My husband didn't even get a C&P exam until 10 months after we filed the claim!

So, how do you bide your time? Chamomile tea? Meditation? Throwing things (that used to be my favorite, until I realized I was the only one picking the things back up!).

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  • HadIt.com Elder

"So, how do you bide your time?"

1. Find a hobby (I got back into radio controlled model aircraft.)

2. If you haven't done it, index the records as to conditions (I do have the records stored in digital format, and an index to them)

3. Research the related subjects and anything related to the military service that the claim is based upon. (This is important for such things as A/O related claims.)

(Since my research, along with a DD-215 (revised DD-214) proved "feet on ground" for A/O, the next step is to find and index records of not yet SC'd conditions that may be a subject of CUE.

4. Take a vacation.

5. Paint anything (Picture, house, barn, whatever

6. Learn about the stock market, since bank and other interest is lower than inflation. (Gotta put at least a part of the retro money to work)

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I had to laugh, Chuck! I've painted my kitchen, and I went back to school full time. Both of those helped take my mind off of things for a while! But these days off from school - I might need to read up on that stock market thing!

I guess I'm overly concerned because my husband is legally blind, and he's not of much help in going over the information I'm accumulating or the forms I'm filling out, and I think I relied on the BVA Field Rep for his expertise, only to find out that he's not terribly reliable. I took a huge binder of all of my husband's medical records, military records (the few I had), surgical reports, Social Security declaration of his disability, etc. over to the guy, all labeled and divided into sections, and pretty much everything that was in there, that he claims he sent over, all seems to be on the list of things they claim they don't have. I had hoped this would all be over by now! I'm getting too old for all this stress!!

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  • HadIt.com Elder

I forgot to mention that profits from stock market dividends may be taxed at a lower rate than "earned income" - - 0 to 15%

That can be quite an incentive! Since most of my "taxable income" comes from the market, it is in my interest to minimize any tax due from it.

A caution is that it's tempting to let such things as IRA's (401k, etc.) to just accumulate until you ether really need the money or reach 70-1/2.

From a tax standpoint, it may be better to start withdrawing in parts as soon as you can.

I had to laugh, Chuck! I've painted my kitchen, and I went back to school full time. Both of those helped take my mind off of things for a while! But these days off from school - I might need to read up on that stock market thing!

I guess I'm overly concerned because my husband is legally blind, and he's not of much help in going over the information I'm accumulating or the forms I'm filling out, and I think I relied on the BVA Field Rep for his expertise, only to find out that he's not terribly reliable. I took a huge binder of all of my husband's medical records, military records (the few I had), surgical reports, Social Security declaration of his disability, etc. over to the guy, all labeled and divided into sections, and pretty much everything that was in there, that he claims he sent over, all seems to be on the list of things they claim they don't have. I had hoped this would all be over by now! I'm getting too old for all this stress!!

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