Jump to content
HadIt.com Anniversary 24 years on Jan 20, 2021 ×


  • veteranscrisisline-badge-chat-1.gif

  • Fund HadIt.com

    11%
    $175.00 of $1,500.00 Donate Now
  • Advertisemnt

  • 14 Questions about VA Disability Compensation Benefits Claims

    questions-001@3x.png

    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
    Continue Reading
     
  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

    tinnitus-005.pngptsd-005.pnglumbosacral-005.pngscars-005.pnglimitation-flexion-knee-005.pngdiabetes-005.pnglimitation-motion-ankle-005.pngparalysis-005.pngdegenerative-arthitis-spine-005.pngtbi-traumatic-brain-injury-005.png

  • Advertisemnt

  • VA Watchdog

  • Advertisemnt

  • Ads

  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

    employment 2.jpeg

    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

HadIt.com Anniversary 24 years on Jan 20, 2021
  • 0

Agent Orange Kadena Afb Okinawa


Question

I am looking for anyone who was on Kadena AFB, Okinawa or .Chanute AFB, IL. My dad was there from Oct. 68-April 70. He has ichemic heart disease, diabetes which has resulted in the amputation of his right leg below the knee and peripheral neuropathy. We were denied in 2002 AMVETS filed a claim on his behalf for heart condition, diabetes and back problems. I refiled in December 2011 and have just received the claim statements and medical release forms. I am familiar with filling out this paper work because my husband is a combat veteran of Iraqi Freedom. I have been reading articles from the Japan times and I am a member of the Agent Orange Okinawa facebook page. Another thing that helps make my dad's case is that he was on Chanute AFB, IL and it is on the EPA Superfund list and has PCBs/Pesticides and Dioxins/Furans listed as ground and water contaminants. I welcome any advice, tips or articles that I may have missed in my own research.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Answers 27
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters For This Question

Top Posters For This Question

Popular Posts

I am looking for anyone who was on Kadena AFB, Okinawa or .Chanute AFB, IL. My dad was there from Oct. 68-April 70. He has ichemic heart disease, diabetes which has resulted in the amputation of his r

http://www.japantime...20120214zg.html “By JON MITCHELL The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has awarded two more former service members compensation for exposure to Agent Orange while servin

Posted Images

Recommended Posts

  • 0
  • HadIt.com Elder

These posts are a little out of order but my reply is to the poster today-Lynette-

You stated :

"We also included another area where he could have become ill.  He handled jet fuel almost everyday for over 20 years, which could have contributed to his situation."

"That's our story. Our attorney believes we will win. I hope he is right." I do too!

I will search the BVA to see if there us anything there that can help- I did find this case:

The veteran was exposed to AO but was also exposed to JP 4 and had colon cancer.(Not an AO presumptive)

Here, the January 2019 VA examiner and Dr. M.M  , the January 2019 VA examiner and Dr. M.M.K. are competent to opine as to the relationship between the Veteran’s herbicide and jet fuel exposure and his colorectal cancer.  Although the physicians reached different conclusions, both opinions were supported by an adequate rationale that included references to medical literature.   Thus, resolving reasonable doubt in the Veteran’s favor, the Board finds entitlement to service connection for the cause of the Veteran’s death is granted.
.K. are competent to opine as to the relationship between the Veteran’s herbicide and jet fuel exposure and his colorectal cancer.  Although the physicians reached different conclusions, both opinions were supported by an adequate rationale that included references to medical literature.   Thus, resolving reasonable doubt in the Veteran’s favor, the Board finds entitlement to service connection for the cause of the Veteran’s death is granted.

In part:

"Here, the January 2019 VA examiner and Dr. M.M.K. are competent to opine as to the relationship between the Veteran’s herbicide and jet fuel exposure and his colorectal cancer.  Although the physicians reached different conclusions, both opinions were supported by an adequate rationale that included references to medical literature.   Thus, resolving reasonable doubt in the Veteran’s favor, the Board finds entitlement to service connection for the cause of the Veteran’s death is granted."

"A December 2013 private opinion from Drs. G.I.G. and B.R. concluded that it was more likely than not that both exposure to Agent Orange and jet fuel during service contributed to the Veteran’s colorectal cancer. Dr. G.G. and Dr. B.R.’s rationale relied on multiple articles, among other sources.  The opinion discusses the carcinogenic effects of Agent Orange and jet fuel.  The opinion names articles which it reports link Agent Orange and jet fuel to colorectal cancer.  Specifically, the opinion uses the Institute of Medicine’s classification of Agent Orange into the category of “Inadequate or Insufficient Evidence to Determine Association” to show there is evidence of biologic plausibility.  Additionally, the opinion discusses a study on chromosomal abnormalities in sheep which found that exposure to Agent Orange increased the risk of chromosomal breakage. The opinion reported that this study explained that animal and human cells have a strong qualitative similarity in response to dioxins, which is a byproduct of Agent Orange. 

A January 2019 VA opinion concluded that the Veteran’s rectal cancer was less likely than not caused by his exposure to Agent Orange and jet fuel. The VA doctor’s opinion relies on research and directly refutes the research presented by the private opinion. The opinion notes that there is no medical evidence that JP-4 jet fuel nor Agent Orange causes or is a risk factor for rectal cancer. "
 

https://www.va.gov/vetapp19/files9/19173836.txt

Have you obtained any IMOs that will help the claim? The JP-4 nexus could be the key to the multiple myeloma condition.

This is a far different disability , in the BVA decision, but often only a very strong IMO/IME =Independent Medical Opinion/ Examination can fully resolve this type of claim.

Then again , I am sure the lawyer has already suggested that to you.

Question:

You said: "He was forced to retire from his career because they said he was unfit to serve world wide because his cancer is incurable and he would need to be monitored regularly."

Do you mean the Military gave him a medical discharge as "unfit to serve"?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 0
  • HadIt.com Elder
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
  • HadIt.com Elder

MODS can you help fix this thread?

Lynette is a new member and both of my replies seem lost in the older thread, but I am sure I posted one n Page 4, then page 5 popped up for my second post , but that other post there is from the older thread .

I am having much trouble today trying to get to Claims Research forum- something seems different.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Berta, I'm having trouble navigating. Anyway, no C-123 travel or exposure.

Being an aircraft mechanic on the F-16's, he was exposed everyday to jet fuel. He had it on his skin. He worked like that every day. Then on Kadena Air Base in 1973-1975, he was exposed to AO while it was being sprayed to kill weeds all around the flightline. He at times sprayed the fence lines for weed control.

Lonnie almost died from Multiple Myeloma and it took him from his career that he truly loved. But for the grace of God!

We have filed and appealed, ....  Finally, we hired an experienced lawyer in this area. You know, the government will never admit that AO was on Kadena. We found some similar cases and sent them to our lawyers. Frankly, I don't know what else to do. This lawyer and his paralegal are truly working hard and I'm hopeful, I guess because they are. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Ads

  • Ads

  • Similar Content

    • By Berta
      I saw this article in the new News Section Tbird has put here:
      https://vanews.wpengine.com/
      https://www.erienewsnow.com/story/42619109/widow-of-vietnam-era-veteran-appealing-denial-of-claim-by-va
      In part:
      "Veterans Affairs states there’s no record of a cancer diagnosis while Richard served in the 1960s nor is there evidence of exposure to herbicides.
      “They actually want a photo of him standing by this particular plane that he guarded, however, that’s not possible because he was in a high-secured area,” Mary said.
      So tying the discovery of Agent Orange barrels to where Richard’s unit was stationed is strategic to the appeal."
      The VA wants to identify what planes he had worked on in Okinawa. It is unfortunate that often widows do not recall things their husband discussed with them, about their service, that could become highly relevant to a successful DIC claim, after they pass.
      ," that’s not possible because he was in a high-secured area,” Mary said." from the above link- but a highly secured area would be an ideal place for the AO to have been sprayed. I assume he worked close to the flight line.
      In the large stack of paperwork in the photo-I hope it includes the veterans SMRs and Personnel file.
      It often pays for veterans to try to find their unit buddies in their lifetime- if not for a VA claim, for the comradery. And one never knows when a unit buddy can help turn a denied claim around ,for living, and even deceased veterans.
       
       
    • By jamescripps2
      I have service connected Chloracne, Diabetes II, and heart disease. In Dec, 2019 I was prescribed by the VA to take 25 mg per day of the relatively new drug Jardiance.  My cardiologist said that it would help with my Diabetes as well as the heart disease. I then started complaining of huge boils coming up in my right and then left inner groin. After many dermatology and emergency room visits, no diagnosis or treatment, other than a look see and another bottle of antibiotics.antibiotics.
      On July 1, 2020, things got a lot worse, so another trip to the ER and another bottle of ills. The pain was so great that I took some very strong opioids and slept away a day and a half. On July 3rd I once again returned to the ER. I have no memory of opening the ER door or seeing anyone. I woke up weeks later in the VA SCIU with  really bad pain. I didn't know why I was there or what had happened to me. I deduced that I must have been involved in a really awful car crash, perhaps someone was killed! Was it my wife, or maybe my grandchildren! With the covid 19 restrictions in place, no visitors. I asked everyone attending me but I got no answers.
      Some time weeks later my cardiologist appeared at my bedside and told me that I had to have emergency surgery for Fournier's Gangrene, a flesh eating bacteria that was caused by a perfect storm, created by the Cloracne, the Diabetes, and the medication, Jordiance. I had lost my private parts, including from three inches above my navel in the front to include my anus in the back. I have huge skin graft sites in my upper legs. the grafts were used to reconstruct from my buttocks to my navel and everything in between. I was given a 4.74% chance to survive the operation. At this time ,I am close to two months out, where I was given a 17.11 % chance of survival of 180 days. 
      There were only 19 cases of Fourniers Gangrene in 35 years, that is until they started prescribing Jardiance, now the FDA has identified 55 new cases.
      The drug goes by several names such as Jordiance, Emphgliflozin, Canagliflozin, and Dapagliflozin, Dapagliflozin is better better known as Farxiga.
      For a more complete story on my experience with the drug listen to the September 17th podcast in Exposed Vets. There will probably be a follow up broadcast later on this year, If I can survive the 180 day period, which is up December 3rd. And yes, I am making plans for the future.
      All I can say at this point is, If you have heart disease and/or diabetes check your medications! especially if you also have chloracne or another skin disease. Inform family and friends. The next time a tv commercial on such drugs Jordiance comes on, listen to the known side effects that are also listed.
      Merry Christmas, and Happy new year!
    • By freedog89
      This is a post looking for information and how to proceed. I applied for diabetes when I got out of the Navy in 2011 and was denied. I put in another claim in 2016 but never received a C& P exam. So I applied again and they recommended I submit a supplemental claim which they denied. I did have a  C& P exam and the examiner stated it was less likely than not incurred or caused by military service.  I was diagnosed with prediabetes and was taking METFORMIN and taking  blood glucose three times a day. I have had full diabetes since 2013.  Favorable findings shows a qualifying event during service (prediabetes) and disability of Diabetes Mellitus II. I have an HLR in but think I will get denied. What is my best option for fighting for service connection?
    • By Berta
      https://www.nvlsp.org/news-and-events/press-releases/nvlsp-seeks-retroactive-benefits-for-blue-water-vietnam-veterans
       
      In part:
      Released 7/13/20 
      "NVLSP Seeks Class Action Order Requiring VA to Automatically Redecide Thousands of Benefit Claims Denials for Agent Orange-Related Diseases Filed by Vietnam Veterans Who Served in the Territorial Sea of Vietnam
       
      --- More than $4.6 billion in retroactive compensation has been paid to Vietnam veterans who set foot on land but nothing to Blue Water Vietnam Veterans--

      WASHINGTON – In an effort to secure retroactive benefits for thousands of so-called Blue Water Vietnam veterans, on July 10, 2020, the National Veterans Legal Services Program (NVLSP) filed a motion for enforcement of the 29-Year Old Class Action Consent Decree in Nehmer v. United States Veterans Administration in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.  The motion was filed with the pro bono assistance of Paul Hastings LLP. 
      The 1991 Consent Decree applies to a class consisting of hundreds of thousands of Vietnam veterans and their survivors who applied to the VA for service connected disability and death benefits due to exposure to Agent Orange, the toxic herbicide used by the U.S. government during the Vietnam War.  That Decree required the VA to pay retroactive benefits to members of the class whenever, during the period from 1991 to 2015, the VA recognized an additional disease is associated with exposure to Agent Orange. 
      Since 2002, the VA paid under the terms of the Consent Decree more than $4.6 billion in retroactive benefits to Vietnam veterans and their survivors if the veteran set foot on the land mass of Vietnam—but absolutely no benefits to Vietnam veterans who served on ships in the territorial sea of the Republic of Vietnam.  The VA’s policy was that these “Blue Water” Vietnam veterans were not covered by the language of the Agent Orange Act of 1991, which provided that veterans who “served in the Republic of Vietnam” during the Vietnam era “shall be presumed to have been exposed during such service” to Agent Orange.  But in 2019, in Procopio v. Wilkie, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit rejected VA’s interpretation of that language and ruled that Congress intended that all Vietnam veterans who served on ships in the territorial sea of Vietnam—within 12 nautical miles of the coast—be entitled to the presumption of exposure. 
      NVLSP’s enforcement motion seeks injunctive relief requiring the VA to redecide the thousands of prior decisions that denied retroactive benefits under the Nehmer Consent Decree due to the VA policy rejected in Procopio v. Wilkie.  
      “The VA’s refusal to correct the wrong it has perpetrated since 2002 means that Blue Water Vietnam veterans and their survivors will continue to be deprived of the benefits to which they are entitled under the Consent Decree.  Some of these veterans have already waited far too long for their country to do right by them.  For many of these veterans and their survivors, the overdue compensation could be life-changing,” said National Veterans Legal Services Program Executive Director Bart Stichman.
      This is the fourth time that NVLSP has filed a motion for enforcement to obtain compliance with the 1991 Consent Decree.  The District Court granted all three prior enforcement motions.  As a result of these successful enforcement actions, NVLSP identified and the VA paid more than 5,100 Vietnam veterans and their survivors an aggregate of over $91 million in retroactive benefits.
      The Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019 (BWN Act) codified the presumption of herbicide exposure for Blue Water Vietnam veterans.  However, the BWN Act does not automatically require the VA to assess if any Blue Water Vietnam veteran or survivor is eligible for retroactive compensation.  The BWN Act requirement to pay retroactive compensation is triggered only if a Blue Water Vietnam veteran affirmatively files a claim after January 1, 2020 and the veteran specifically identifies the Agent-Orange related disease that was the subject of the earlier claim.
      The BWN Act does not completely correspond to the Nehmer Consent Decree.  Some Blue Water Vietnam veterans and their survivors may be eligible for retroactive compensation under the Consent Decree but not eligible under the BWN Act and vice versa.  As a result, the House Report on the BWN Act states that “Nothing in [the BWN Act] intends to limit the rights of Nehmer class members who seek relief for benefits under the Nehmer Consent Decree.”
      The article goes on to state the history of Nehmer. I certainly hope and pray that  NVLSP is again successful in their motion to force compliance from the VA with the Nehmer Court Order.
      This is another utter disgrace that Blue Water Navy veterans have to put up with, until VA is forced ,legally, to do the Right thing.
       
       
       
       
       
       
    • By Berta
      This is the first time VVMF has honored this day as Agent Orange Awareness Day. 
       
      If you are a Gold Star Wife or Gold Star Husband, check your email for their announcement on this day. My husband's photo above is on line with info on others who are honored in a special plaque on the Wall.
      I found it on line today  at the VVMF site,and it still hurts to know he is gone. He was an altar boy in Middleton,NJ and the rest of the photo shows him with his mother, in front of their house , and was taken one week before he left for USMC. 1964. His hair had  began to turn white after he his discharge from USMC , 1968.
       
      While their names are not on The Wall, they are never forgotten. On the Vietnam Veterans Memorial site in Washington, D.C., a special plaque reads: “In Memory of the men and women who served in the Vietnam War and later died as a result of their service. We honor and remember their sacrifice.” Click to learn about the In Memory program.
      https://www.vvmf.org/In-Memory-Program/
       
      In Memory was created in 1993 by the group – Friends of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. VVMF began managing the program and hosting the ceremony in 1999. More than 4,700 veterans have been added to the In Memory Honor Roll since the program began. To see all the honorees, please visit the In Memory Honor Roll.
      https://www.vvmf.org/In-Memory-Program/
      The relationship of the VVMF  to the Wall is here:
      https://www.vvmf.org/About-The-Wall/  It is an overwhelming site. I was there the day after the dedication and the Mall in DC was still filled with thousands of Vietnam veterans , and their families at the Wall .
      A tracing from the Wall can be used for a PTSD claim, if one of your stressors was seeing a unit buddy killed in Vietnam.
      And dont miss the Moving Wall either- https://www.truckload.org/news/transport-the-wall-that-heals-in-2020/
      But I believe their schedule has been affected by the Covid Virus- but Maybe not-------
       
       
       
  • Ads

  • Our picks

    • Post in New BVA Grants
      While the BVA has some discretion here, often they "chop up claims".  For example, BVA will order SERVICE CONNECTION, and leave it up to the VARO the disability percent and effective date.  

      I hate that its that way.  The board should "render a decision", to include service connection, disability percentage AND effective date, so we dont have to appeal "each" of those issues over then next 15 years on a hamster wheel.  
    • Finally heard back that I received my 100% Overall rating and a 100% PTSD rating Following my long appeal process!

      My question is this, given the fact that my appeal was on the advanced docket and is an “Expedited” appeal, what happens now and how long(ish) is the process from here on out with retro and so forth? I’ve read a million things but nothing with an expedited appeal status.

      Anyone deal with this situation before? My jump is from 50 to 100 over the course of 2 years if that helps some. I only am asking because as happy as I am, I would be much happier to pay some of these bills off!
        • Like
      • 13 replies
    • I told reviewer that I had a bad C&P, and that all I wanted was a fair shake, and she even said, that was what she was all ready viewed for herself. The first C&P don't even  reflect my Treatment in the VA PTSD clinic. In my new C&P I was only asked about symptoms, seeing shit, rituals, nightmares, paying bills and about childhood, but didn't ask about details of it. Just about twenty question, and  nothing about stressor,
    • This is the latest Compensation & Pension (C&P) Clinicians Guide dated 20180719. The only other one I've seen is dated 2002, including the one on this website and the VA website. I got this from my claims agent, who got it from the VA.

      VA Compensation & Pension (C&P) Clinicians Guide 2 Final Corrected 20180719.pdf
      • 12 replies
    • I don’t say thank you enough to all of you...
      You, yes you, are the reason HadIt.com has remained a resource-rich resource. Thousands come each month to read, ask questions, or to feel a sense of community.

      Last month June 2020, we over 50k visitors they viewed over 160k pages. Veterans and their advocates, spouses, children, and friends of veterans come looking for answers. Because we have posts dating back 15 years and articles on the home page, they usually can find an answer or at least get pointed in the right direction.

      You all made that possible. Thank you.
        • Like
      • 8 replies
  • Ads

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ad

  • Latest News
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

{terms] and Guidelines