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Advice On How To Get Increase


Spanman

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Hi folks,

I need help on how to get increase in my disabilty. Currently the VA has me at 30% for Bi-lateral Plantar Fasciitius, this has been an ongoing fight for me and trying to tie my Low Back issues with PF but I may get to that later. I visited the DAV yesterday and they told me I couldn't really request a increase, my Primary care or Podiatrist must state in my records that I meet the more "Pronounced" criteria as opposed to the now "Severe" and then to request an increase and add that my low back issue is "secondary to or exasberated by" the original issue. How in the world to I ask my physcian to report that condition has worsened and meets the higher criteria? I can barely get them to discuss my blood work much less something that will cause an increase. I have been fighting for far too long and as of now my Poditrist, physical therapist and Dr have all but quit and are (and have been) refilling my script for Morphine every month. Morphine, 30mg a day. A DAY! Anyway I could use some advice on how to make this work........

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  • HadIt.com Elder

My advise is to go to the VA SRD ( VA Schedule of Ratings) here---- (halfway through the link is the info you need) and check the rating critera for your disabilities.


Do you have diagnosed pes planus or heel involvement with the bilateral foot condition?

Any knee, hip or back pain possibly due to the foot condition?

"Anyway I could use some advice on how to make this work........"

Get copies of all of your medical records and get an IMO from a real doctor. One who is familiar with these types of conditions.

I have a podiatrist who is also a foot surgeon. That is the type of IMo doc you need or one who is familar with orthonic biomechanical problems.

I had a chronic back ache for decades. I worked on my feet all my life ending up as a livestock farmer, totting the bales etc etc , and just dealt with back pain without really looking into it.I hate meds so I kept it from my PCP as long as I could.(I am a civilian not a vet)

5 years ago I could hardly walk. I thought I had MS. My PCP referred me to the podiatrist who gave me orthos and ( I was expecting my daughter home on Mil leave the same day the orthos had been made and he got them in)
After hours cooking all the goodies she wanted,with the orthos in my shoes, and not using my braces, I finally went to bed and woke up ever since without a chronic back ache!

I weed wacked yesterday for hours....no back pain.....

My point here is I fully know how foot conditions can cause severe pain and other problems to back,knees and hips,....and there is a case of pes planus at the BVA whereby the veteran was awarded 100% extraschedular because his SC flat feet had caused unemployability due to the secondarys they caused.

I was lucky to not have a problem that caused me more disability ......never dreaming severe pronation was causing my inability to even walk.


"Morphine, 30mg a day. A DAY! "
GEEZ!!!!!

They sure know you are in severe pain !!!!.....is your care from the VA for this or from real doctors?????

When you file the claim, tell them to consider the DeLuca factor.

Are you able to work?

Edited by Berta
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I am diagnosed (according to the decision) bilateral plantar fasciitis nearly approximate a "Severe" condition. I have heard Pes Planus and seen it mentioned in my records but it's not written in the decision. I believe at this point I should be the higher evaluation as it is NOT improved with inserts (wearing them for 15+ years) and inward displacement, spasms and pain upon manipulation. My lower back has been a problem and in my records but they state it wasn't "Chronic" and now as years have gone on it has become more severe. They have started to recognize the affect but are not tying it together.

The VA have been sending me to a downtown Podiatrist for years, he has put me thru his entire regimen from PT, Heat/icing, stretching, cortisone shots (6 each foot in 12 months) and other pain pills and he has told me all he can think of is exploratory surgery (his words 50/50 and "I wouldn't do it if were me").

I have seen the VA Podiatrist in Seattle and he gave me 6 shots (nerve blocks) over a span of 6 months along with all the regular stuff to no avail and has told me that there is nothing left but surgery (and he also stated he wouldn't do it).

I am still seeing my General practitioner (8+ years) from the VA whom is prescribing my Morphine (30Mg a day CR and 15Mg IR for breakthrough pain) and I have been referred by her downtown for Nerve studies (all negative), a MRI (L5-S1 minimum bulging), PT and the rest of the typical regimen.

I have seen my regular Doc (non-VA) and he has been sending me to Chiropractic care and PT stating he can no longer think of anything to do, he did send me to a Podiatrist...the same one I am seeing for the VA (small pool of Dr's in Alaska).

The original VA Podiatrist is one whom had written a long explanative on the relationship and architecture of the Feet and the back, went into great detail of how they are related and put it in my files. He also told me the VA would probably reject the info during my C&P for some reason or another and he was right. The exam findings stated that they had never read anything (in a medical journal or report) tying the two together, I fought it but my VFW dropped the ball and didn't file in time...so I switched to the DAV and they tell me any evidence already submitted cannot be looked at again.

I don't want anyone to create and Bravo Sierra on my behalf, but I know if someone sifted thru my records they would put two and two together to show I am not getting better...and by the VA prescribing all these efforts without any betterment, I am getting worse and it starting to effect more functions of my body. Yes I am working, I've tried to taper off the Morphine because frankly I need my brain, I've quit drinking two years ago because I was drinking away pain and depression. I have gone to anger management and also requested pain management classes and anything to help cope thru the VA (they haven't got back to me yet). I have so much info and I know this entire thread will be full of it...I just need the right people to help!

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I have the opposite problem with my feet than pes planus. I have pes cavus. I have had foot problems for 25 years and longer if I had known what my problem was, and not just sore feet. One thing that will make your feet worse is weight gain. When I worked 12 hours a day at the USPS on my feet is when I had acute PF. After my shift I could hardly walk out to my car. The next morning when my feet hit the floor I was in agony. Orthotics helped to a degree. If you want to connect all your other conditions you need medical statements that make the connection in a cause and effect manner just like Berta is saying. Don't depend on the VA for this. They won't do it.

I did notice that my feet were hurting way beyond normal when I first joined the Army, but I thought everyone's feet hurt. However, when I went to sick call about my feet and knees the medic threw me out because he said their was nothing on my xray. If the dumb ass had of understood anything he would have seen an abnormally high arch. When you have pes cavus it puts lots of pressure on the PF. My PF used to just cramp up and I could not walk. I know that bad foot problems are the pits. That was one reason I retired on disability from USPS. I got the condition certified as work related and got compensation for my feet from the feds, but I lost my job anyway. 20 years of working on my feet on a concrete floor hurt me worse than the army.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

A large problem is that we are not Doctors and I wonder about some that treat us.

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