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Project 112 And Project Shad (deseret Test Center)


Guest allan
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Question

Project 112 and Project SHAD

(DESERET TEST CENTER)

Pocket Guide

BACKGROUND

• The Department of Defense (DoD) conducted a series of operational tests from 1962 to 1973 in support of Project 112. Project 112 was DoD’s comprehensive program of chemical and biological warfare vulnerability tests, which were conducted to determine how to protect U.S. troops against these health threats.

• Project SHAD (Shipboard Hazard and Defense) tests were the shipboard tests. SHAD tests were conducted to evaluate effectiveness of shipboard detection of chemical and biological agents, the effectiveness of protective measures, and risks to U.S. forces. For the land-based tests, the purpose was generally to learn more about how chemical or biological warfare agents behave under a variety of environmental conditions.

• Deseret Test Center testing used biological and chemical warfare agents, simulants, tracers, and decontaminates.

• DoD reports that about 6,000 veterans participated in Deseret Test Center testing. Most veterans participated only in the shipboard tests (SHAD).

• DoD has collected, reviewed, and declassified documentation. As medically relevant information was declassified, DoD provided VA with the test name, date, and location (for SHAD, the name of the ship); identity of involved veterans; and materials to which participants may have been exposed.

• The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) is contacting identified Deseret Test Center veterans, urging them to have a clinical evaluation at the nearest VA medical center if they have any health concerns.

• DoD reports that no veteran is known to have become acutely ill from exposures during these tests. Also, in a recent VA health care utilization review, no diagnosis stands out among Project 112/SHAD veterans. Consequently, there is no SHAD test or examination as such at this time.

• Due to new legislation enacted in late 2003, veterans are exempt from co-payments for care or medications required for treatment of any health problem possibly related to participation in Project 112.

• VA contracted with the Institute of Medicine in September 2002 to conduct a three-year, $3 million study of possible health effects associated with Project SHAD in order to ensure appropriate health care and assistance for veterans.

Continued on Back

Revised January 2004

Produced by the VA Employee Education System

POTENTIAL EXPOSURES

Project 112 involved biological and chemical warfare agents, simulants, tracers, and decontamination chemicals. Protective measures were used when biological or chemical warfare agents were tested; prior research suggests that the other agents are unlikely to cause long-term health effects without signs of acute toxicity soon after exposure. Most veterans were exposed to only one or a few of these agents, but some veterans may have been involved in multiple tests and repeated exposures. The agents included:

Biological Agents

Coxiella burnetii (OU), Francisella tularensis Staphylococcal enterotoxin, Type B (PG2)

Biological Simulants

Bacillus globigii (BG), Escherichia coli (EM)

Serratia marcscens (SM)

Chemical Agents

Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA),

VX (P32 radiolabeled VX), Ester of benzilic acid (BZ)

Tracers

Tiara, Calcofluor, Zinc cadmium sulfide (ZnCdS), Uranine dye (sodium fluorescein), Phosphorous 32 (P32)

Chemical Simulants

Methylacetoacetate (MAA), Sulfur dioxide (SO2), Di 2-ethylhexyl phosphite (DEHP), Tri (2 ethyhexyl) phosphate (TOF), Bis (2 ethyl-hexyl) hydrogen phosphite

Decontaminates

b-propiolactone

Riot Control Agent

CS (Tear Gas)

ACTIONS

All enrolled Deseret Test Center (Project 112/SHAD) veterans will be offered a complete “Primary Care New Patient History and Physical Examination” even if the veteran has previously received health care from VA. (See http://vaww.va.gov/health/him/VHACC/vaphyspage.htm)

The name of the specific Project 112/SHAD test that the veteran was involved in and possible exposures should be recorded in the patient’s medical record. This information will be obtained from the notification letter from VBA and from reports of the veteran.

Each VA medical facility will have a designated representative to provide information about Deseret Test Center (Project 112/SHAD) and possible adverse health effects.

INFORMATION

VA: www.va.gov/shad/ for information on Project 112 and potential exposure risks.

DoD: http://www.deploymentlink.osd.mil/current_issues/shad/shad_intro.shtml

(Web sites should be checked periodically for updates as new information becomes available.)

VA Help Line toll-free telephone: 1-800-749-8387

DoD Direct telephone Hotline: 1-800-497-6261

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  • In Memoriam

The DoD forgot to mention tick-fever as one of the agents.

The DoD also forgot to mention test that the US was doing human test experiments with the UK aircraft and SHAD, during the test years. This is being worked on now. Have pictures. I was there.

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This thread is over 365 days old and has been closed.

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If this is your first time posting. Take a moment and read our Guidelines. It will inform you of what is and isn't acceptable and tips on getting your questions answered. 

 

Remember, everyone who comes here is a volunteer. At one point, they went to the forums looking for information. They liked it here and decided to stay and help other veterans. They share their personal experience, providing links to the law and reference materials and support because working on your claim can be exhausting and beyond frustrating. 

 

This thread may still provide value to you and is worth at least skimming through the responses to see if any of them answer your question. Knowledge Is Power, and there is a lot of knowledge in older threads.

 

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