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QUESTION: How can I be absolutely sure I get a copy of my COMPLETE medical records from 1972-1975?

2013, I requested and actually DID receive SOME medical records (I did not know they were incomplete) from NPRC.

2014, I requested(*see attached) medical records from 1972-end of 1975, and got this response from the NPRC:

"ORIGINAL MEDICAL RECORD NEEDED TO ANSWER YOUR INQUIRY IS NOT IN YOUR FILES; THAT MEDICAL RECORD IS WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA)"

Attached are the TWO NPRC responses to the TWO medical requests that were just under one year apart. In one case I received information, and in the most recent case I was told it does NOT exist at NPRC. Please understand that my mind is racing with "WTF!", anger, puzzlement, etc. Understanding that the records I am requesting are over 40yr old and existed with the NPRC last year, how can they now be "missing"?

FWIW, my disability rating came in Dec 2013 (for a 1972 TBI) and the examiners had way more medical records information in front of them on their PCs than I had ever received after my 2013 request for that SAME information. Some of that EXTRA medical records that I did NOT receive, but the examiners had and used, actually DID help me in receiving my 50% rating, BUT I am lost, feeling that the records that have been kept from me, could and probably do, indicate I should have a much higher rating than what was awarded.

I am about ready to launch a letter writing campaign including several Congressmen, the VA Secretary, and others. Is THAT my next step?

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Edited by HorizontalMike (see edit history)
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Mike

I served in USMC from 1966 to 1970. In 1970, I submitted a request to NPRC for all of my medical records from 1966 to 1970. I received only a small portion of my medical records. In 2010, I submitted another request to NPRC for my medical records and told them I had only received part of my medical records in1970 and was trying to find the other records. I actually received a telephone call from a helpful gentleman at NPRC who told me they might possibly be able to locate additional records if I could provide more specific info regarding exactly where I received medical treatment, name of facility, when I received treatment, etc. After doing a review of some of my old military records for specific dates and locations of my service, I submitted additional info to NPRC and received about twice as many records as I had before. I know there are more records that I have not received but I received the records I needed for my claims.

Based on my conversation with the NPRC employee, it sounds like they only spend a limited amount of time on each records request and the more info provided to them results in more records being found during that limited amount of time.

Good luck to you

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Mike

Based on my conversation with the NPRC employee, it sounds like they only spend a limited amount of time on each records request and the more info provided to them results in more records being found during that limited amount of time.

Good luck to you

I guess the employee doesn't know how to eat an elephant (one bite at a time) and just booted my request to the chit-can. Below is the actual information I gave NPRC when making my request. I do not know what more I can do to be more specific, as THAT is why I am asking for these records in the first place. Very frustrating.

*SF 180 Addendum – Request Pertaining to Military Records

Section II – Information and/or Documents Requested

#1 CHECK THE ITEM(S) YOU ARE REQUESTING:

Medical Records – Requesting ALL in-patient and out-patient Service Treatment Records (STR), Health and Dental Records for the following dates and locations:

  1. USS Theodore E Chandler DD-717 all SHIP’S Medical Records 26Aug72—15Dec72
  2. Naval Medical Center, San Diego CA all Medical Records 01Oct72—01Jan73
  3. USS Dehaven DD-727 all SHIP’S Medical Records 15Dec72—26Feb73
  4. ? Hospital Ship, anchored Long Beach CA all Medical Records 26Feb73—01Aug74
  5. USS Wabash AOR 5 all SHIP’S Medical Records 08Mar73—31Aug75
  6. Oakland Naval Hospital Oakland, CA all Medical Records 26Feb73—31Aug75
  7. TPU, ADCOM Great Lakes, IL all Medical Records 01-Oct75—17Oct75
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Once you make a claim with the VA they pull your Service Med recs from NPRC and keep them. Why they let the VA archive anything is beyond belief. Those records should be in your c-file. Now I had a c-file for 30 years and the Va lost my entire C-file (shredded). Then they came back and said no record of this condition exists in my SMR's. No duh! They said they had to rebuild my c-file with nothing in it! Military Hospital records are usually kept at the military hospital for inpatients. If you have dates that you were in a military hospital and give that ifo to NPRC they might be able to come up with those records.

Edited by GatorNavy (see edit history)
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Once you make a claim with the VA they pull your Service Med recs from NPRC and keep them. Why they let the VA archive anything is beyond belief. Those records should be in your c-file. Now I had a c-file for 30 years and the Va lost my entire C-file (shredded). Then they came back and said no record of this condition exists in my SMR's. No duh! They said they had to rebuild my c-file with nothing in it! Military Hospital records are usually kept at the military hospital for inpatients. If you have dates that you were in a military hospital and give that info to NPRC they might be able to come up with those records.

I made my FIRST disability claim Sept. 2012, almost a year earlier than when NPRC actually accessed and sent me some of my medical records (August 2013). You may be correct in that the VA pulled them from NPRC, but I sure wonder why they waited so long to do so. Color me confused...

I visited the local VA office and received the obligatory abuse when asking to access my VA records via VBMS. The VA lady, during this encounter, tried to interview me at the reception desk in front of ~30 other veterans who were waiting. All other VA workers/technicians were taking their clients one-at-a-time to their own assigned cubicles in the locked back office to do their business. NOT this VA tech, so I took the direct approach and asked "Why are you trying to do this in public?" She tried to continue, so I repeated my question. She finally acknowledged my question and said that we could indeed go back to her cubicle, BUT STILL DID NOT invite me to do so. So I had to clearly state to her that YES, we should go do that, in order to conduct business.

It went down hill from there. I asked for copies of, or access to my VBMS file. Dumbfounded, this lady kept saying over and over again... "VBMS is a database, VBMS is a database, VBMS is a database..." as if those were magical words that would make the devil go away. No matter what I asked about seeing my records..."VBMS is a database..." was the answer. I asked to see my medical records..."VBMS is a database.." etc...

I stated that I thought you (VA) was supposed to help me get access to my records. To which she replied "I am", and offered nothing more, no explanation, nothing. I HAD to ask to request a copy of my C-FILE, and if I had not known to ask THAT question, she would NOT have offered to give me the form letter requesting the C-FILE. She exemplified the proverbial stone wall, that was for sure.

In the end, I did get a stamped/dated copy of my C-FILE request. And then left.

Your comments about the VA "losing" your C-FILE, is the reason I want to get a copy ASAP.

Edited by HorizontalMike (see edit history)
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Now you'll have to wait for your C-file to see what is missing (almost a guarantee) or which other Veterans records have been added to your file. You may find that the VARO staff will act like they have an IQ of 85 from now on. Good Luck!

Edited by GatorNavy (see edit history)
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Mike

I served in USMC from 1966 to 1970. In 1970, I submitted a request to NPRC for all of my medical records from 1966 to 1970. I received only a small portion of my medical records. In 2010, I submitted another request to NPRC for my medical records and told them I had only received part of my medical records in1970 and was trying to find the other records. I actually received a telephone call from a helpful gentleman at NPRC who told me they might possibly be able to locate additional records if I could provide more specific info regarding exactly where I received medical treatment, name of facility, when I received treatment, etc. After doing a review of some of my old military records for specific dates and locations of my service, I submitted additional info to NPRC and received about twice as many records as I had before. I know there are more records that I have not received but I received the records I needed for my claims.

Based on my conversation with the NPRC employee, it sounds like they only spend a limited amount of time on each records request and the more info provided to them results in more records being found during that limited amount of time.

Good luck to you

Do you, or anyone else, think it is wise and/or efficient to:

  • Break up the requested information to be more "task specific" (easier to accomplish by the assigned NPRC technician), such as request only the medical information from a single duty station or medical facility?

  • Send multiple requests to NPRC, after having done the above?

  • What about requests to the VARO for specific "parts" of my claims file such as my medical records just for 1972?... or just 1973?... or just from Oakland Naval Hospital? Does anyone think this might be very useful AFTER getting a copy of my entire C-File?... In other words, data-mining the VA one bite at-a-time?

  • And one last question string... What part of the VA actually HAS my physical medical records for safe keeping? The central VA office? The specific VARO? What if I move across country to another VARO?
Edited by HorizontalMike (see edit history)
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Mike,

No I do not.

I think all original military records including medical records should be maintained at one central location like the NPRC. The ideal situation would be for the records to be placed on a database so they could accessed anytime by the individual veteran and/ or other agencies such as the VA. By placing the records on a database which is backed up to prevent unintentional loss of records, this would insure the records would always be available. Years ago, a lot of military records were lost in the fire in St. Louis. Today we have the technology available to prevent this from happening again.

This is just my opinion and I know the likelihood of the NPRC doing the above is slim to none.

Good luck to you.

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I found that getting medical records is one of the most maddening parts of this process! So you are not alone in that!

Keep in mind, that LAST THING VA wants is for you to have your OWN medical records. That would allow you to prove your case and rebut any ridiculous denials they come up with. So they are going to make it very difficult.

Just a few notes based on my own observations:

Make multiple requests to NPRC. It even says on their website, that at your first request they will not send you everything.

Once a vet files a claim with VA, the regional office requests those records from NPRC. From that point on, those records are then stored at that regional office. If there is no activity for a long time, then the records are moved to VA Records Management Center. You should definitely send them a letter requesting your records. here's the link

http://www.va.gov/directory/guide/facility.asp?ID=5380

If your records are still at the regional office where you last had your claim processed, then the only way to get them is with a request for your C-file. VA will drag this out as long as possible. I've heard of many taking 1 or 2 years. If you live close to your regional office, then go in person and ask to "view your cfile". they might stall you by making you request an appointment for that.

Clearly you were dealing with an idiot employee at VA who couldn't explain to you that VBMS is the database that holds your cfile, among other things. Cfiles used to be all paper, but VA has decided they want everything electronic. So they are scanning all the paper cfiles into the electronic VBMS database.

All of your ships medical records go straight into your Service Medical Records aka Service Treatment Records.

Oakland Naval Hosp. (Oak Knoll) got demolished back in the 90s. Any other specific hospitals you went to, you can contact them and ask for a copy of any records they still have. I tried that and they said they were so old they had been sent to NPRC. They did turn up in the cfile.

Regarding the TBI, VA doesn't rate it based on how bad or severe your injury or accident was. They rate it based on the "residuals" or how it affects you now. Therefore, any old records will not help you get an increase in your TBI rating. All you can do to get that increased in file for an increase with a statement of your worsening residuals.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Generally, your service medical records, once transferred to the VA, are kept in your claims file, at your VARO. If you change States/VARO's and request your c-file be forwarded to your new VARO, then the c-file, w/those service medical records, will go to the new VARO. Your service medical records generally do not include stays in a military hospital. You have to contact that military hospital or if the military hospital was in VN, the NPRC would have them, in that hospital's archived records.

pr

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Keep in mind, that LAST THING VA wants is for you to have your OWN medical records. .....they are going to make it very difficult.

Just a few notes based on my own observations:

Make multiple requests to NPRC. It even says on their website, that at your first request they will not send you everything.

Once a vet files a claim with VA, the regional office requests those records from NPRC. From that point on, those records are then stored at that regional office. If there is no activity for a long time, then the records are moved to VA Records Management Center. You should definitely send them a letter requesting your records. here's the link

http://www.va.gov/directory/guide/facility.asp?ID=5380

If your records are still at the regional office where you last had your claim processed, then the only way to get them is with a request for your C-file. VA will drag this out as long as possible. I've heard of many taking 1 or 2 years. If you live close to your regional office, then go in person and ask to "view your cfile". they might stall you by making you request an appointment for that.

All of your ships medical records go straight into your Service Medical Records aka Service Treatment Records.

Oakland Naval Hosp. (Oak Knoll) got demolished back in the 90s. Any other specific hospitals you went to, you can contact them and ask for a copy of any records they still have. I tried that and they said they were so old they had been sent to NPRC. They did turn up in the cfile.

Regarding the TBI, VA doesn't rate it based on how bad or severe your injury or accident was. They rate it based on the "residuals" or how it affects you now. Therefore, any old records will not help you get an increase in your TBI rating. All you can do to get that increased in file for an increase with a statement of your worsening residuals.

Yeah, understand that the VARO wants to make things difficult for any and all who makes requests. We''ll work on that one.

Q #1: So if my records are now at the VARO, does that mean ALL of my records are at the VARO? If so, that would make multiple requests to NPRC fruitless, wouldn't it?

Q#2: Does this NOW mean that I should be directing multiple requests at the VARO? You know, just to keep them awake and working?... ;-)

Q#3: How often should I be requesting my C-File? I requested once thus far, in the past month.

RE Oakland Naval Hospital... I did receive a 2-page progress report from a NPRC request in 2013. Don't know how much more there is though. My Disability Examiner and Rating stated something about my being treated for depression in 1973, and I am betting that that is also from Oakland Naval Hospital as well.

FWIW, about the TBI. I truly DID NOT know I had one in 1972. I only knew that I had had a motorcycle accident in service and did not even know the month or year when I first started asking questions about my ongoing major depression and 30-40yr of losing job after job after job. Even after three college degrees and three professional certifications, I could NOT keep a job longer than about 2yr. Long story made short -- I didn't know I had any brain damage. I told the neuro-psychologist that I just wanted to know... "Was I just born an axe hole or what?" and I said it in actual descriptive terms because of my 40 year history of losing jobs. This was before the whole psych workup and the MRI that showed a "stroke" as they called it. I call it ischemic insults because, as I am finding out, that is probably more accurate and probably tied to the TBI. I always thought other folks were picking on me, so I saved all of the reprimands, termination letters, axe chewings, etc. I was determined to get those folks back, never realizing that those documents only prove THEM right and not me. Coming to terms with this TBI thing 40yr late sure has its challenges. About all of those documents I saved... that is my basis of appeal. Being truly unaware of any TBI manifestations in my life, I was truly not prepared for what they found and determined.

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Q #1: So if my records are now at the VARO, does that mean ALL of my records are at the VARO? If so, that would make multiple requests to NPRC fruitless, wouldn't it?

Not necessarily. In our case our first request they send us a letter pretty much like yours that said they don't have anything and it's all at the regional office. But on a second request two pages of medical records unseen before magically appeared.

Q#2: Does this NOW mean that I should be directing multiple requests at the VARO? You know, just to keep them awake and working?... ;-)

Q#3: How often should I be requesting my C-File? I requested once thus far, in the past month.

Definitely I sent them a letter every 30 days reminding them of my request and stating that it was the second request third request fourth request etc. It's really going to depend on your regional office how soon they give up the C file. If you're at a small office like Kansas or something you would probably get it in a couple months but if you're at one of the busy offices like one in California or Florida expect that it will take a really long time.

RE Oakland Naval Hospital... I did receive a 2-page progress report from a NPRC request in 2013. Don't know how much more there is though. My Disability Examiner and Rating stated something about my being treated for depression in 1973, and I am betting that that is also from Oakland Naval Hospital as well.

What exactly Is your goal with your claim?

It looks like you feel like you should be rated higher than 40% on the TBI?

Are you also trying to get depression secondary to the TBI?

Or are you going for a direct service connection for the depression?

What exactly did you file for previously, what was denied? And did you post your denial letter?

We can help more if we know exactly what your goals are.

FWIW, about the TBI. I truly DID NOT know I had one in 1972. I only knew that I had had a motorcycle accident in service and did not even know the month or year when I first started asking questions about my ongoing major depression and 30-40yr of losing job after job after job. Even after three college degrees and three professional certifications, I could NOT keep a job longer than about 2yr. Long story made short -- I didn't know I had any brain damage. I told the neuro-psychologist that I just wanted to know... "Was I just born an axe hole or what?" and I said it in actual descriptive terms because of my 40 year history of losing jobs. This was before the whole psych workup and the MRI that showed a "stroke" as they called it. I call it ischemic insults because, as I am finding out, that is probably more accurate and probably tied to the TBI. I always thought other folks were picking on me, so I saved all of the reprimands, termination letters, axe chewings, etc. I was determined to get those folks back, never realizing that those documents only prove THEM right and not me. Coming to terms with this TBI thing 40yr late sure has its challenges. About all of those documents I saved... that is my basis of appeal. Being truly unaware of any TBI manifestations in my life, I was truly not prepared for what they found and determined.

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RE NPRC requests ...Definitely I sent them a letter every 30 days reminding them of my request and stating that it was the second request third request fourth request etc. It's really going to depend on your regional office how soon they give up the C file.

My VARO is the Houston Texas VARO, and I understand it is one of those "needs improvement" situations as ID'd by this latest VA shakeup.

  • What exactly Is your goal with your claim?
  • It looks like you feel like you should be rated higher than 40% on the TBI?

I have been unemployed and un-employable in my trained occupation in education, for 8-years and counting (PhD Educational Administration, Principal Certification, Teacher Certification). I bounced from education job to education job UNTIL I became unemployable because they don't even respond after awhile. I was unemployed for 6-years straight, at the time I approached the VA for help with my decades long ongoing major depression. I have documented negative manifestations of my TBI/Depression/Sleep disordered behavior that I can trace back to at least 1986. These are manifestations that show just how my TBI/Depression/Sleep disordered behavior effected and affects my ability to work. NONE of this was presented in the original claim because I was still pretty much in the dark about my disability. Only AFTER getting the rating and the listed criteria for ratings, that I realized just how much it has affected my life for +40-years.

And YES, I believe that my work ~30-years of related documentation shows my disability to a far greater extent than any pen&paper or verbal quiz could ever hope to. My disability deals with executive dysfunction. It is subtle yet has torpedoed my professional career aspirations time after time. FWIW, I do NOT believe that a MoCA test administered within the total 27min window of my TBI examiner's interview/assessment would be remotely adequate. IMO, ~30-years of work history strikes to the heart of the matter. And YES, I will probably best seek an IMO (or two) tying this all into my disability.

  • Are you also trying to get depression secondary to the TBI? Or are you going for a direct service connection for the depression?

YES, secondary service connection to the TBI. VA also ruled on this aspect of TBI in the past year, just after my rating. Many sources but here is just one.

MY PROBLEM: The TBI clinic posted an error in my file when diagnosing my Major Depression. They mistakenly stated my depression "started when I fell off the ladder in 2010". This was NOT true, as that accident only contributed in exacerbating my decades long depression. I think they were distracted by the fact that I broke 23 ribs & vertebrae in that one accident. Anyway, it got entered into my Progress Notes as depression "starting in 2010", and then repeated in the disability examiner's rating decision(Dec 2013) to deny my depression as service connected. Luckily, my initial psych eval consult indicates depression as long term and entered BEFORE actually getting the complete psych workup. See attachment, part of consult..

I need to get this mistake in my record corrected in order to get the Depression correctly rated.

  • What exactly did you file for previously, what was denied? And did you post your denial letter?
  • We can help more if we know exactly what your goals are.

Original claim was:

  • TBI Awarded 40%
  • Tinnitus Awarded 10%
  • Bilateral Hearing Loss Awarded at 0%
  • Depression DENIED

See attached RATING.

We are going through this exact same thing. My hubby has a TBI from a head injury when he fell about 50 feet on a ship. We didn't really find out until recently how much that has affected his life. Many things that I thought were just "personality quirks" really originated from that accident. There are many ways it has manifested itself but the one that really causes the household the most turmoil, Is the mood swings- I have nicknamed him "Jekyll and Hyde". One minute he's happy fun guy and the next minute somebody says something wrong to him and he flies off the handle and the rest of the day is ruined and he goes outside and sulks.

While none of this is fun to go through, I do appreciate the empathy. Thank you!

And yes, I too have a similar reputation, though slightly different title... DrMike & Mr Hyde. I tend to rub my degree into the VA, and it tends to make my "doctors" very uncomfortable that I have an equal educational attainment to them, but in a different academic area. I am sure it chaffs them and that their gut reaction is more attuned to "If you are so smart, just get over it!" even though all have been careful to not say as much. Oops, my TBI is showing! This kind of thing has caused me to changes jobs several times... ;-(

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Edited by HorizontalMike (see edit history)
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A VA claim needs 3 things:

1. a diagnosis or symptoms of an issue in service

2. a current diagnosis. This can come from your VA doc, the VA C&P exam or from a private physician.

3. a nexus statement showing the link to service

Did you already file an appeal or a reconsideration with new and material evidence?

Regarding the depression denial, I think it is fairly straightforward how to get it approved. The depression was denied due to no nexus statement-the statement tying your depression to service. At the C&P exam, the examiner did not give you the nexus statement. You can try again with a new VA C&P exam, but the best thing to do is get a IMO/IME done by a doc familiar with VA protocols. In their letter, they will need to directly rebut the previous doctors statements, especially the one about the incorrect dates of 2010 depression onset.

Doctor Valette may be able to do it. http://www.shrink911.net/services.htm

If not, any qualified psychologist or psychiatrist...

They should also fill out the DBQ for depression.

Reading the denial for depression, under Item #4, paragraph 2, they did not consider it as "secondary to TBI". They evaluated it as a direct service connection. Which is fine. A direct service connection or a secondary service connection both workout the same, just different evidence is needed, depending which way you are seeking the service connection. The letter states you had symptoms of depression in 1973 during service. That satisfies part 1. It sounds like you have a current diagnosis of depression. That satisfies part 2. But part 3, the nexus statement was not given.

Have you bought the Veterans Benefit Manual yet? I think it would give you a lot of insight into this process. http://www.lexisnexis.com/store/catalog/booktemplate/productdetail.jsp?pageName=relatedProducts&prodId=12734

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The new TBI presumptive rules are nice and will benefit a few vets, but the rules are so narrow, many will not be able to use it. For the depression to be presumptive to TBI, the depression has to be actually diagnosed within 1 year of a mild TBI or within 3 years of a moderate or severe TBI. No diagnosis during that timeframe, then no presumption. The only thing the presumption does is alleviate the need for the nexus statement. So unless you had a actual diagnosis of depression during those timeframes, you still need the nexus statement.

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Did you already file an appeal or a reconsideration with new and material evidence?

Yes, this past March. At the time I did not have the above "initial psych eval" Progress Notes (post #13). Those came within a week after I submitted the Appeal. Now that I have that, do you think that that initial evaluation would provide that nexus?

Regarding the depression denial, I think it is fairly straightforward how to get it approved. The depression was denied due to no nexus statement-the statement tying your depression to service. At the C&P exam, the examiner did not give you the nexus statement. You can try again with a new VA C&P exam, but the best thing to do is get a IMO/IME done by a doc familiar with VA protocols. In their letter, they will need to directly rebut the previous doctors statements, especially the one about the incorrect dates of 2010 depression onset.

  • Regarding the IMO, should I seek a neuro-psychologist, neuro-psychiatrist, or a run of the mill psychologist or psychiatrist?
  • Should I probably seek more than one IMO/IME?... One for the nexus and one for current disability (remember "increase" of TBI + "initial rating" of depression)

They should also fill out the DBQ for depression.

Got it. Will do.

Reading the denial for depression, under Item #4, paragraph 2, they did not consider it as "secondary to TBI". They evaluated it as a direct service connection. Which is fine. A direct service connection or a secondary service connection both workout the same, just different evidence is needed, depending which way you are seeking the service connection. The letter states you had symptoms of depression in 1973 during service. That satisfies part 1. It sounds like you have a current diagnosis of depression. That satisfies part 2. But part 3, the nexus statement was not given.

Will work on clearing up the nexus. I am thinking the my initial psych consult (in post#13) will/should go a long ways in helping establish nexus since it shows continual use of depression medication (for about +20yr at this point), but understand the need for IMO.

Have you bought the Veterans Benefit Manual yet? I think it would give you a lot of insight into this process. http://www.lexisnexis.com/store/catalog/booktemplate/productdetail.jsp?pageName=relatedProducts&prodId=12734

I will put this on my wish list, though as many hours/days that I am on VA.gov I have found much of what is in the table of contents. In another month or so will have the $$$.

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No, that letter will not be enough for a nexus statement. Here's a link explaining more about the nexus statment.

http://www.benefits....stBySymptom.asp

---Refer to the VA rating guidelines

http://www.vetsforju...n’s Guide.htm

or

http://www.americanb...uthcheckdam.pdf

Each DBQ must include multiple parts:

1). Diagnosis

2) Statement that Dr. reviewed the pertinent medical records or check the applicable box if available.

3) Nexus Statement from Dr. that says "condition X is at least as likely as not due to condition Y".

4) Rationale Statement from Dr. explaining how he came to his conclusion on the Nexus. Must give specific reasons why one condition caused or aggravated the other.

5) Statement from Dr. regarding his medical degree and qualifications, his CV

On most DBQ forms only #1 and #2 are part of the form. You must have your Dr. write in #3, #4 & #5 if they are not part of the form. I'm NOT saying a DBQ without each of these 5 Items can't be approved. I'm saying these are 5 of the things that if any of them ARE missing, VA has used as an excuse to deny a claim.

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No, that letter will not be enough for a nexus statement. Here's a link explaining more about the nexus statment.

http://www.benefits....stBySymptom.asp

---Refer to the VA rating guidelines

http://www.vetsforju...n’s Guide.htm

or

http://www.americanb...uthcheckdam.pdf

Each DBQ must include multiple parts:

1). Diagnosis

2) Statement that Dr. reviewed the pertinent medical records or check the applicable box if available.

3) Nexus Statement from Dr. that says "condition X is at least as likely as not due to condition Y".

4) Rationale Statement from Dr. explaining how he came to his conclusion on the Nexus. Must give specific reasons why one condition caused or aggravated the other.

5) Statement from Dr. regarding his medical degree and qualifications, his CV

On most DBQ forms only #1 and #2 are part of the form. You must have your Dr. write in #3, #4 & #5 if they are not part of the form. I'm NOT saying a DBQ without each of these 5 Items can't be approved. I'm saying these are 5 of the things that if any of them ARE missing, VA has used as an excuse to deny a claim.

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Sorry about the broken links. I copy and pasted them and it didn't carry over. See if these work.

http://www.benefits.va.gov/COMPENSATION/dbq_ListBySymptom.asp DBQ list

http://www.benefits.va.gov/compensation/dbq_disabilityexams.asp info on DBQ's

http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?rgn=div5;node=38:1.0.1.1.5 rating guidelines

more TBI info, including link to TBI clinicians guide.

http://www.hadit.com/forums/forum/79-tbi-traumatic-brain-injury/ TBI section of hadit, in case you havent already read it

 

At this stage, your claim has been denied for depression, so another option is to seek out a veteran claims disability lawyer. They do not charge anything upfront and usually take 20% of the backpay. They can help you get these IMEs as well as focus your correspondence to VA on the issues that need the focus. Chris Attig is one that posts occasionally here on hadit. http://www.attiglawfirm.com/about-the-firm/about-chris-attig/

---might be worth having a conversation with him.

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Sorry about the broken links. I copy and pasted them and it didn't carry over. See if these work.

http://www.benefits.va.gov/COMPENSATION/dbq_ListBySymptom.asp DBQ list

http://www.benefits.va.gov/compensation/dbq_disabilityexams.asp info on DBQ's

http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?rgn=div5;node=38:1.0.1.1.5 rating guidelines

more TBI info, including link to TBI clinicians guide.

http://www.hadit.com/forums/forum/79-tbi-traumatic-brain-injury/ TBI section of hadit, in case you havent already read it

 

At this stage, your claim has been denied for depression, so another option is to seek out a veteran claims disability lawyer. They do not charge anything upfront and usually take 20% of the backpay. They can help you get these IMEs as well as focus your correspondence to VA on the issues that need the focus. Chris Attig is one that posts occasionally here on hadit. http://www.attiglawfirm.com/about-the-firm/about-chris-attig/

---might be worth having a conversation with him.

This is all good stuff, thank you once again. In my data mining of the VA.gov I have become familiar with much of it and have it book-marked on the PC.

Do you know if there is a "2014" edition of the Veterans Benefit Manual coming out soon?

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