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How Long Does A Gulf War Illness C&p Exam Take?


puppyduks

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I have an exam scheduled. The guy said it is a 4 hour exam. What will happen in the exam, and will it really be 4 hours, or is that just a "guesstimate"?

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Depends on what you are claiming. If you are claiming a multitude injuries/symptoms/benefits then it could take that long. What will happen in the exam: The doctor/nurse/pa, etc. will have your claimed disabilities and will exam/question you for for each one according to the DBQ (Disability Questionnaire) for the particular disability you are claiming. The DBQ's can be viewed here: http://www.benefits.va.gov/compensation/dbq_ListByDBQFormName.asp

You will be ahead of the game if you study the DBQ(s) that are applicable to what you are claiming.

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I really varies my friend, and I agree with all the advice given above. I had a ton of C&Ps over the last two weeks, a few lasted less than 30 minutes, but most were close to 2 hours. Good luck and keep us posted.

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puppy

I had a couple c&ps done in reference to gulf war illnesses in one sitting. They told me to allot 3- 4 hours for the exams but only lasted about 90 minutes, if that long.

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Thanks guys (gals?). The exam just says "medical". I am claiming Fibromyalgia. The VA did the blood and x rays long ago, then sent me to VA neurologist who said it was Fibromyalgia with a possible Gulf War Illness Component. I am also claiming PTSD. I am a Desert Storm vet (gal).

One of my symptoms is IBS so I was worried they would do a colonoscopy at the C&P. I would need to make arrangements for someone to drive me home if that was the case. The C&P paperwork was vague about whether I would need someone to drive me home, or if I would be okay to drive after the appointment.

Edited by puppyduks
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They may not do a Colonoscopy on the spot, but a few weeks ago I had my Crohns Review, and a Doc and 2 interns did stick a camera in my rear while I was awake laying on my site. Not to comfortable that is for sure.

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What I was told was that they block 4-5 hours for the examiner, so they have time to review your c-file. Your exam will only last as long as you, need to explain your symptoms to the examiner. There was no blood work, no testing. She did a basic check; listen to heart and lungs, checked reflexes, asked me if i was currently being treated by a physician. I said no, she said there is nothing wrong, and sent me on my way after about 20 minutes. Hopefully yours goes better. I have since went to a private physician, and after months of testing and exams I think I have everything I need to complete my claim.

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I am not sure what "secondary" means. I put Fibromyalgia, PTSD, Depression, IBS and CMI on the original claim. When the VA closed out and denied my claim in error late last year I got them to re-open my claim. They re-opened my claim but it now says for Fibromyalgia, GAD, MDD, PTSD. They did not put IBS or CMI on the re-opened claim. So I am not sure how the "claimed conditions" thing works.

I have two C&P exams coming up. One is for "medical" and one is for PTSD. The one for "medical" is the 4 hour exam. I just don't know what they are going to examine. I am guessing an exam for Fibromyalgia since my IBS claim did not get re-opened?

Edited to add that the VA has already taken about 21 vials of blood, done x-rays (everything normal, no arthritis) and sent me to the VA neurologist.

Edited by puppyduks
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Glad to see that your claim is finally moving bud. Good luck

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puppyduks,

You can file for a "secondary condition" when medical evidence shows a secondary medical condition was caused by a medical condition already service connected. A veteran with service connected Type 2 diabetes often files a secondary claim for peripheral neuropathy because diabetes causes neuropathy.

If you have filed a claim for a medical condition you believe was directly caused by your military service and it was denied, it is still possible to file a claim for the same medical condition as a secondary medical condition if you have medical evidence showing the secondary medical condition was caused by a service connected medical condition.

Take copies of any supporting evidence with you to your exams. Having the evidence with you and readily available for the examiner's review because it could make a difference between approval and denial.

Good luck and thank you for your service.

GP

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According to the answers you provide to the examiner, you will likely be told to follow up on the issues with your PCP. Make sure you run down EVERY contention that is discussed. The VA seems to be more interested in collecting the data, than treating the veteran or obtaining proper diagnosis.

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Folks:

You can see my experience in a previous post. I know that every doc is not the same but I'm even more convinced that even with bullet proof evidence with Gulf War Issues, most of it comes down to the "Luck of the Draw" and the doctor that one draws to do your exam. Although, I don't have the full results, there was a very fast cursory exam, he asked a hand full of questions and I was out of the office in very short order. It was pretty clear to me that he had already predetermined what he was a going to write and I bet that one could lay several vets examinations and most would look very much the same in terms of the conditions and the final outcomes. Although I have not experienced this before, I've now seen it and will include the experience in the article that I'm currently working on about experiences with the Fully Developed Claims Process and some of the challenges that vets face.?. I'm an Analyst and my world is a lot about the data and the evidence that is provided to arrive at a diagnosis or a decision. That said, this end game of disbility is about American Citizens and their families that have sacrificed and served the nation. So, an examiner has an obligation to follow the rules precisely and to look at absolutely "all" of the relevant data to arrive at an all important decision. However, I have not seen that in all cases and that is very disturbing to me.? I had a GW exam on Friday so I'll see if my theory holds true...the examiner made very little eye contact and I felt like I was going through an assembly line? But I'll reserve any final judgement until I get the final results? However, my intuition has been "spot on" since filing this claim and I've learned that there is a wide difference in terms of abilities and attitudes by the medical examiners that hold our fates in their hands.

Edited by rootbeer22
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my ortho c&p for my IU lasted less than 15 minutes. the doctor clearly told me the VA had made a mistake sending me (wheelchair bound because of my back) in for an exam. he wrote same.

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Hi, sorry I have not updated in a timely manner. I had my C&P's and the 4 hour exam was really only about an hour. The PTSD one I am not sure how long it lasted, it seemed like it lasted maybe 36 hours, it was rough. I am guessing maybe 2 hours? The docs were all very nice and professional, not their fault for it being rough, just my own issues. There was no colonoscopy, just a routine exam and answering a lot of questions.

I looked on my healthevet and the notes from the C&P's say that I have fibromyalgia and IBS and PTSD. The fibromyalgia and IBS they said impacted my work. I really hope they don't say that I am unemployable. I may not play nice with others and may not be the easiest employee to manage, but I would hate to not be able to perform some kind of useful work even if it is a greeter at WalMart. The PTSD they said had reduced reliability in most areas work, social, cognitive etc functioning.

I am really relieved to know that my fibromyalgia is not some rare disease or cancer that I picked up in the war that is slowly killing me (what I thought previously). It sucks to have, but it won't kill me so that's good.

The IBS- well, now I have an explanation for all those extra bathroom breaks that I needed for all these years at work, that I got harassed by my supervisors for because they thought I was just lazy and wanted extra breaks. Validation is a wonderful thing. :)

the PTSD- I am really bummed. This is the third doctor that has said I have it. I don't want to have it. I want to be normal like I was before the war. Still trying to come to terms with this one. Almost 2 years at the Vet Center/VA and I still don't want to accept that I have it.

I am not sure what my rating will be but I already have the knowledge that I was most interested in: The diagnoses.

Thank you all for your advice and comments, and good luck with your claims.

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