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Explain These Terms


jessie0054

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Unfavorable is indicating a medical concern of damage and limitation.

Doesn't pertain to the spine, but gives an idea of favorable/unfavorable ankylosis:

From BVA 9410884 -

"Ankylosis is considered to be favorable when the ankylosis does not prevent flexion of the tip of the finger to within 2 inches (5.1 cm) of the median transverse fold of the palm. It is unfavorable when it precludes such motion."

Guess you'll have to find out the exact motion range for favorable/unfavorable spinal ankylosis.

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Guest jangrin

Jesse,

I ran across this today while researching in the 38 CFR 4, I remembered you asking a question about the lumbar spine and ankylosis, I'm not sure, is this what you were looking for?

Jangrin :D

4.45 The joints.

top

As regards the joints the factors of disability reside in reductions of their normal excursion of movements in different planes. Inquiry will be directed to these considerations:

(a) Less movement than normal (due to ankylosis, limitation or blocking, adhesions, tendon-tie-up, contracted scars, etc.).

(:) More movement than normal (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.).

© Weakened movement (due to muscle injury, disease or injury of peripheral nerves, divided or lengthened tendons, etc.).

(d) Excess fatigability.

(e) Incoordination, impaired ability to execute skilled movements smoothly.

(f) Pain on movement, swelling, deformity or atrophy of disuse. Instability of station, disturbance of locomotion, interference with sitting, standing and weight-bearing are related considerations. For the purpose of rating disability from arthritis, the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle are considered major joints; multiple involvements of the interphalangeal, metacarpal and carpal joints of the upper extremities, the interphalangeal, metatarsal and tarsal joints of the lower extremities, the cervical vertebrae, the dorsal vertebrae, and the lumbar vertebrae, are considered groups of minor joints, ratable on a parity with major joints. The lumbosacral articulation and both sacroiliac joints are considered to be a group of minor joints, ratable on disturbance of lumbar spine functions.

Edited by jangrin (see edit history)
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Jesse,

I ran across this today while researching in the 38 CFR 4, I remembered you asking a question about the lumbar spine and ankylosis, I'm not sure, is this what you were looking for?

Jangrin :D

4.45 The joints.

top

As regards the joints the factors of disability reside in reductions of their normal excursion of movements in different planes. Inquiry will be directed to these considerations:

(a) Less movement than normal (due to ankylosis, limitation or blocking, adhesions, tendon-tie-up, contracted scars, etc.).

(:) More movement than normal (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.).

© Weakened movement (due to muscle injury, disease or injury of peripheral nerves, divided or lengthened tendons, etc.).

(d) Excess fatigability.

(e) Incoordination, impaired ability to execute skilled movements smoothly.

(f) Pain on movement, swelling, deformity or atrophy of disuse. Instability of station, disturbance of locomotion, interference with sitting, standing and weight-bearing are related considerations. For the purpose of rating disability from arthritis, the shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle are considered major joints; multiple involvements of the interphalangeal, metacarpal and carpal joints of the upper extremities, the interphalangeal, metatarsal and tarsal joints of the lower extremities, the cervical vertebrae, the dorsal vertebrae, and the lumbar vertebrae, are considered groups of minor joints, ratable on a parity with major joints. The lumbosacral articulation and both sacroiliac joints are considered to be a group of minor joints, ratable on disturbance of lumbar spine functions.

Thanks Jangrin:

I also found this last night in the C&P guide:

Favorable Ankylosis = a segment of the spine means ANKYLOSIS is fixed in a neutral position.

Unfavorable Ankylosis means a segment of the spine there is a fixation in flexion or extention and there is a functional impairment because of the ANKYLOSIS.

Since it was writen by the Dr doing my son's C&P that Ankylosis is present the ROM was defered as he didn't want to cause a " Flare up "

Just trying to figure out what the Ankylosis might mean in the Rating of his back. And also what it might mean that he is status post surgical with the placement of plate and screws because of unstabization of spine.

Thanks,

Jessie

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