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Blood Clot in Knee


Charleese

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Hi All,

I have a 100% vet who recently had a bad fall and ended up in the emergency room in the town he lives in because VA hospital was to far to take him to.  In examining him they found the blood clot in his knee.  The doctor at the hospital is telling him that he can't go home and told him to call the VA and see if they can monitor him for the blood clot for his INR level, while he's at home.  He's going to have to have blood thinners for the rest of his life. They also want him to have a physical therapist to come to his house and give him physical therapy for about 3 to 6 weeks.  Right now he can't put in any pressure on that leg at all.  This is the same knee that he hurt in the service that keeps giving out on him.  Can he put in a claim for AA, through the VA and if so what can he expect to receive.  Thanks in advance for your replies.

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Better that he start by filing an increase in his S/C knee condition, and a secondary claim for the clot. VA would likely rate the blood clot condition with the knee, but it is possible that the overall percentage would increase. 

Special Monthly Compensation depends on a number of factors. It could be based solely on rating percentages of separate conditions and the overall percentage.

Have a doctor perform an exam, fill out a VA Form 21-2680, and submit it. The information from that form will assess whether or not the Veteran can qualify for A&A or Housebound benefits. The completed form is sufficient detail for the VA decision makers to determine the extent that a disease or injury produces physical or mental impairment. It also addresses how the loss of coordination or enfeeblement affects the ability to dress and undress, to feed him/herself; to attend to the wants of nature, or keep him/herself ordinarily clean and presentable.

Good luck.

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