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  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

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    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

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Billyboy

Question

Berta, you said on the TDIU form, “Under # 18 they mean SSA benefits as well as any other disability retirements benefits” I have no SS disability, the only monies from them is what I paid into, (my retirement) is this to be put on line 18?

How much weight does the VA give on the meds side affect issue, some of the meds the local hospital has given me has side affects that I DID complain about after taking them. One says, “may cause a cough,” I complained about a cough several times and they tested me for COPD. Of course the tech did the test twice to get an “average”. The average was within in limits! A lot of side affects said, may cause dizziness, when picking up my hearing aids the doctor test me for dizziness. How much weight will this carry? And a couple others.

Also someone posted “By the way if you if you read the VA regs carefully you will see that your major depressive symptoms and unemployable should be rated at 70% minimum.” Where can I find this?

This person went on to say “I would low profile some of the issues not service connected with the depression”

Does any one know where these regs are? And what is meant by low profile?

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Billyboy

What I think low profile you NSC disabilites means is that the VA will often try and blame your unemployability on your NSC conditions even though you have major service connected disabilites. They did that to me and I was 70% SC. I applied for IU and they tried to blame my IU on injuries I received while working for the post office.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

Billyboy,

Side effects from medication do carry some weight when the VA is deciding the issue of IU, provided those side effects are from medications you're taking due to service-connected disabilities. As far as line 18, I believe they want any disability retirement you receive.

Whoever said "By the way if you read the VA regs carefully you will see that your major depressive symptoms and unemployable should be rated at 70% minimum" to certain extent is correct; however, it largely depends on what your treatement records state and the C&P exam says. Keep in mind a GAF score alone does not warrent a rating, it must coincide with the write-up.

Vike 17

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Vike is correct here and I too am wondering about that other post- and the # 18 question means any disability retirement like SSA for disability-

If a vet intends to apply for SSA for their disability they should mark this as yes and tell VA that they are doing this-as SSA records can often be critical to a claim.

Regarding SC meds- with side affects-

this has some weight if the side affects can somehow affect employability-

such as causes confusion, causes sleepiness or sleeplessness, and certainly 'Do not take and drive'- hinders ones ability to be employed.

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  • In Memoriam

Yes: You can get service connection for disabilities caused by meds prescribed for s/c injuries. One I see a lot is SMC “K’ for vets who experience erectile dysfunction due to meds. Another was a client of mine whose prescribed heroin made him sleep all the time. If you can only produce low results on PFT tests due to meds, and meet the standards for COPD, then you can get this.

On your other question, Major Depression is a characterization of a psychiatric disorder – not a description of the severity of that disorder. I have seen it rated at 100% and at 20%.

Alex

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Alex

Are you saying it is just as easy or hard to get 100% for depression as it is for PTSD or any other mental disorder. My impression was through expericne is that it does not matter what the psychiatric diagnosis is but the symptoms. You can be IU for general anxiety disorder as easy as PTSD if you symptoms keep you from working.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

John999,

Yes, you can be rated for depression on its own, such as Major Depressive Disorder, and Dysthymia. They also fall under the rating criteria for mental disorders. However, I think Alex meant to say 10% or 30% instead of 20%.

One thing to keep in mind is that a veteran can only be rated for one mental disorder. For example, PTSD or Depression, not both.

Vike 17

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I learned a long time ago that it is much easier for a Veteran to get 100% for Major Depression than to get it for PTSD and the hoops the VA makes you jump to get PTSD. Strange thing is most who have PTSD also have Depression.

A Vet who used to post here who injured his back and was Service Connected for it was recently rated 100% for Depression caused by his back problems.

I think a lot of Veterans miss the boat of Service Connection for secondary conditions.

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Guest jangrin
I learned a long time ago that it is much easier for a Veteran to get 100% for Major Depression than to get it for PTSD and the hoops the VA makes you jump to get PTSD. Strange thing is most who have PTSD also have Depression.

A Vet who used to post here who injured his back and was Service Connected for it was recently rated 100% for Depression caused by his back problems.

I think a lot of Veterans miss the boat of Service Connection for secondary conditions.

Pete,

It is really important that all veterans look and thier current medical conditions and research any other conditions that could be caused from or secondary to the original ailment/disease/injury.

I totally agree that it is very important to apply for SC on any secondary conditions.Often the secondary conditions can be worse and result in more damage than the primary. DMII is a good example of this. Although DMII has its own disabling properties, the secondary conditions such as Coronary Artery Disease, High Blood Presure, Perifieral Arterial Disease, are just a few. Then the secondary processes can result in yet another disabling problem, such ED, or stroke, amputation, blindness. I think DM and DMII are probably the most disabling and distructive conditions as far as having the most effect on so many of the bodies systems. (Short of those who are currently suffering from a form of terminal illness).

Long term though DMII is incredibly destructive and then combine that with the medications for all of these problems and the inability to exercise because of heart problems I would diffinently add DEPRESSION to the list, who wouldn't be after learning all this stuff is going on. I get depressed just thinking about all there is to learn in order to keep up with the current research so I can help my husband, who suffers from DMII.

People who have had physical injuries such as broken bones or back and neck injuries need to look at the inability to do physical work and limations, pain from arthirtis and lack of mobility are all seconday to injury. I would reccommend anyone who has a service injury and suspects that they have additional problems because of that injury to seek an IMO doctor to evaluate them and SC the condition and file their claim for a rating. Protect yourseleves now for the future. Most conditions do not get better, once they are developed and diagnosed they generally worsen over time. File now don't wait until the condition is so debilitating that you are unable to work and loose everything waiting for your due from the VA.

JMO

Jangrin

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