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Need help on PTSD impact letters.


Pyroclastic Flow

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I have been here 10 years and never heard the term "impact" letters.  

Assuming you are SC for PTSD, YOUR DOCTOR needs to document your symptoms and whether or not your PTSD has increased or reduced in severity.  

"Buddy letters" (that is, lay evidence) mainly applies to documenting your in service event.  

Only a doctor can diagnose PTSD and evaluate its severity and/impact on your life.  

I suggest you honestly tell the doctor, at the review, your symptoms and how you think PTSD affects your life.  Its okay to have notes with examples of how you think PTSD has affected your life.  

You should focus on 2 areas:

1.  The effect of PTSD on employment.  An example of this would be if you got mad at work, and started throwing things around, or punching someone.  

2.  The effect of PTSD on your social life.   An example of this would be if your wife woke you from a deep slumber, and you thought she was the enemy and punched her.  If she then called the police on you and took you to jail for the weekend, then so state.  

Do not use my examples.  Use examples from your real life.  

     My advice is to know what to say when the c and p doc says, "How are you?"

Dont say the traditional "fine", if you got in a fight with your wife last night and spent the night in jail, only to wake up and go to a c and p exam.  

Instead of "fine", say something like:  "Today is much better than Thursday.  Then tell him what happened on your worst day."  

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3 hours ago, broncovet said:

I have been here 10 years and never heard the term "impact" letters.  

Assuming you are SC for PTSD, YOUR DOCTOR needs to document your symptoms and whether or not your PTSD has increased or reduced in severity.  

"Buddy letters" (that is, lay evidence) mainly applies to documenting your in service event.  

Only a doctor can diagnose PTSD and evaluate its severity and/impact on your life.  

I suggest you honestly tell the doctor, at the review, your symptoms and how you think PTSD affects your life.  Its okay to have notes with examples of how you think PTSD has affected your life.  

You should focus on 2 areas:

1.  The effect of PTSD on employment.  An example of this would be if you got mad at work, and started throwing things around, or punching someone.  

2.  The effect of PTSD on your social life.   An example of this would be if your wife woke you from a deep slumber, and you thought she was the enemy and punched her.  If she then called the police on you and took you to jail for the weekend, then so state.  

Do not use my examples.  Use examples from your real life.  

     My advice is to know what to say when the c and p doc says, "How are you?"

Dont say the traditional "fine", if you got in a fight with your wife last night and spent the night in jail, only to wake up and go to a c and p exam.  

Instead of "fine", say something like:  "Today is much better than Thursday.  Then tell him what happened on your worst day."  

I hadn't heard the term impact letters either. I was told they are from people who knew you throughout your career and noticed the changes. Battles, wife, kids, co-workers.

Edited by Pyroclastic Flow
Better way to convey what I was saying.
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Bronco's advice is great.  I would like to add the caveat that only a VA doctor can diagnose PTSD. 

When you go to the exam you might be nervous.  Do not worry, they expect this.  They will be dwelling on a part of your life that you care not to remember.  Never mislead the doctor, being found out will void your claim.  As Bronco says do not say you are fine.  Tell the doctor what has been happening in your life.  You may not want to discuss very personal matters but these are important.  If you are having trouble functioning due to PTSD tell the doctor.  Especially if you are isolating or not sleeping.

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I worked in a PTSD combat group in 1983 ( VA Vet center) and know many PTSD vets, and I married one.

I too have never heard the phrase "impact" letters, for a PTSD claim-

The VA will be seeking a stressor-and if you do not fall under the 2010 PTSD regulations, ( these were mainly for combat veterans), they will need to verify your stressor (s).

I have an article here under a search as to what is and what isn't a stressor-

And also an article on Buddy Letters.

Broncovet and vetquest are correct- the VA will only accept a PTSD diagnosis from a VA doctor.

And that is only half of the hurdle. A Major stressor is what gives anyone PTSD. Unless you fall into the 2010 regulations and/or have the CAR, CIB, and/or PH on your DD214, you will need to give the VA a stressor they can verify or that you can verify yourself by writing to JSRRC ( their address is here under a search)

Maybe I am misunderstanding your question-by "review" , is this for your first PTSD C & P exam?

Or ,are you SCed already for PTSD, and this is their regular periodic review- to see if you still have PTSD----

Don't get me wrong- PTSD does not vanish and there is no Cure, and as long as a PTSD veteran takes their PTSD meds, and goes to their VA MH appointments- then there should be no problem with the review.

 

 

 

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For me my PTST was due to MST and part of my claim paperwork did include a letter from my adult daughter who wrote her experience over the years watching how I suffered with irrational fears, extreme startle response, history of nightmares, panic attacks and other odd behaviors I tried to hide but still  affected my life and my children in a life altering way.  I agree that ptsd never goes away And even though I have participated in much therapy and I have learned to manage my behaviors a little better it’s  something I live with every day.  

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