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Why Must Vets


AllTheWay

Question

Greetings my Hadit Family.

I do have a lot of why questions and some of you might have your opinions as to why.

I am pretty sure that most of us are familiar with the 38 CFR. Most of us had an injury or illness while in the military either was caused by service or aggrevated while one service.

This is it so hard to get it service connect. Do know half of the answer. Bigger bonuses for VA reps.

Why are Vet's told that Vets need an IMO, IME or some type of Nexus. (My hand is raised, Pick me, Pick Me). Because the VA knows that it is very difficult to get such Nexus. The VA knows that most doctors will not write a nexus. If they do, it takes years of test and treatments before they would consider writing but at least they are getting paid. Job security. Doctors are no dummy. Even though a private Doctor has read your SMR, and see that you did have an incident or injury while in service, the Doctor is still hesitant to write such letter because the Doctor does not know what the Vet has done post service. The Vet goes out and spend big money for an IMO, IME etc. I have seen vets still get denied after spending the money. The VA see that if the Vet has that type of money to spend, then why do they need to be service connected.

I have seen Vets spend thousand's of dollars and IMO's IME's DBQ's etc. My outside VA PCP had did 3 DBQ's at 400 a pop for me and use the magic word that VA likes and still got denied. I have seen  and personally know people spend 2000.00 at Reemedical out of San Diego and got denied. I have read post were Vets went to other places like Dr. Bash, some got denied. So what now. The Vet have to lawyer up because of the amount that they have spent just to get that denial.

Look at our WW2 Vets as well as our Nam Vets. We as vets know what our past Vets have went through and some do not have that much money to get a nexus, Imo time, and have a low disability rating, but the injury or incident happened while in service. The first thing that VA states, you need a nexus. Now our elder vets just settle  for a lower rating until death. Is this right? is this taking care of our vets that have put their lives for our country?

I would love to hear your thoughts on this.

 

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The VA changed the rule where it takes a IMO to win and that the VA doesnt give them out to you. Most of us are not here to shoot the proverbial shit and go on and on how Galileo was right the Earth is not flat and people are still trying to prove him wrong. Dr Bash stated this and I'm not going to spent time looking for the link of where he mentioned it, prob his website.

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  • HadIt.com Elder

This idea that you have to go pay a special doctor to write a special letter is incorrect, and quite frankly, for what certain doctors charge specifically for it, preditory. Having a separate letter specifically saying that x is caused by y makes it more simple than finding in your records but you can do that too- take the time to read them and see what's in there And in your claim summarize your notes and point too it. "Doctor says x is caused by y".  You are your own best advocate. If you think it's caused by service ask them. They don't know if you don't tell them your suspicions, but if you march in expecting a doctor to just write a letter after a visit or two to support a disability claim then you are expecting them to ethically endanger their licence. If you get shot down by multiple doctors consider the possibility that your x isn't caused by y. Just because some doctor says that x is caused by y doesnt always make it true, and considering that imo specific doctors all have the clause of they get paid whether you get service connection or not should be a clue. 

And stop assuming the VA has some dark conspiracy to deny everyone, or worse, you personally. VA has its faults but for many of us it's the best or only thing we have. Tens of thousands of vets have all filed claims and succeeded, but VA feels the need to pick on 'you'? Come on.

 

Briefly consider that not every condition and ailment is caused because you were in the military. Sometimes shit just happens. 

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There are many vets here and elsewhere who could never have gotten a solid "nexus" until they hired an IMO/IME doctor.

However, if they do not feel an IMO/IME is worth the investment ( meaning they do not believe a doctor would find it in their SMRs, if that is the type pf nexus they need)then they might as well not pay money for what cannot be done.

You said:

 "My outside VA PCP had did 3 DBQ's at 400 a pop for me and use the magic word that VA likes and still got denied."

Did the VA consider these DBQs at all?

Did he give a full medical rationale for the opinions?

Did he use the criteria for IMO/IMEs here in the IMO/IME forum?

Maybe we can help more if we know what you claimed and why VA denied the claim.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Berta
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  • HadIt.com Elder

I didn't say that there was no value to an imo, especially if you are refuting. I was countering the commonly held opinion that a specific imo is a always necessity, and that paying money for one is going to give you a better chance. I'd rather have my own doctor write a rationale if I needed one not a doctor whose advertised business is cranking out imos. Yes, some doctors won't write one ever, but most won't until you've seen them for awhile. I'd question The ethics of any doctor that would write one after 1 visit or phone call and a coursory read of your medical notes. 

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I just read AllTheWay's other post in a different thread.

They mentioned the lack of chronicity for treatment of the neck injury. 

That is a big hurdle to overcome.It isn;t impossible.My neighbor's SMRs revealed a back strain he had in service and they service connected it- when he claimed it -about 20 years after he left the Military. Then again he had X rays and other evidence of it in service . It was also mentioned on his discharge certificate.

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The overwhelming reason Vets need IMO's is because VA provides inadequate C&P exams. Most of these exams are performed by nurse practitioners and physicians assistants and even pediatric doctors. A Podiatrist performing a C&P for back and spine issues? No problem at VA. Most of the time these examiners are out of their league and just research to deny service connection or nexus.  Unfortunately for Vets the RO/BVA treat the word of these examiners as gold. An exam by a MD whose specialty is the disability in question must then be brought in by the Vet to validate a claim by showing the unqualified examiner is wrong.  Most can't afford the IMO and VA knows that so the system favors denial which is what they want.

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