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VA and/or private doctor


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Question

I'm putting together a supplemental claim and I debating whether to work with a VA doctor and my private doctor for more evidence.  My private doctor has agreed to fill out a new DBQ and write a nexus letter.  Also I am scheduled to see a primary care doctor at the VA for other issues, and I'm not sure whether to bring these issues up with him while I'm there and see if he will support my side.  I've heard this particular doctor is one of the more veteran friendly ones, but I also don't want to jeopardize my appeal by getting the VA any more involved before the disability is granted.  Anyone have any thoughts or experience?

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Your call, go with the doctor you feel most comfortable with and the one that has treated you the most and more familiar with you and your symptoms.  If your doctor is filling out a DBQ there is no need for an actual nexus letter just make sure he/she completely fill it out with ( FUNCTIONAL IMPACT SECTION) and (PHYSICIAN'S CERTIFICATION AND SIGNATURE SECTION).  By completely filing out the DBQ and commenting how your disability impact work and or activities should really help your claim. 

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Im not looking to go with one or the other necessarily, but use the VA doc in addition to my private.  My worry though is anything that goes on record with that doc is up for grabs to the VA.

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Ok, well if you are seeking comp for PTSD, the VA "will only accept" VA docs diagnosis of PTSD.  

If its some other diagnosis, then a private doc diagnosis works just as well.  Dont ask me why Va does stuff, they dont consult with me when they make rules.  

Its YOUR MONEY, but, if I had a Vet Friendly VA doc, I would certainly seek his services.  My Vet Friendly VA doc was "the deal maker" in me getting my full ratings.  

Mostly Vets turn to private practice docs only when VA docs let them down by providing negative evidence.  

Remember, "even if" your VA doc does provide negative evidence, a great IMO will overcome that.  I have had many VA docs, and some provided negative evidence, and, like many Vets, I won my claims, in part, because of Benefit of the doubt.  For example if Doc A says, "nope, not due to service", and doc b says, "Yep this is at least as likely as not related to service"

you should get SC.  (The VA can select one opinion over another, but must give a reasons and bases for doing so, such as Doc A was more thorough.  For example, if Doc A saw you for 10 years and doc b saw you for 15 minutes, they can select the doc with more experience with you.  

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I think there is a big difference in the way we sometime perceive these VA Dr as ''Veteran Friendly''

I thought I had a veteran friendly VA M.H. Dr  she cut up with me we joked around and I had a good repore with this Dr  until I mention a claim to her..she was not so veteran friendly then  and never helped me one bit  when I filed my PTSD Claim.

she said'' I do not do veterans claims that is not my job  you need to go see the claims people for that  like the DAV''

and she was not happy I had ask her for her help filing a claim and her fill out the DBQ.

so be careful asking these Veteran friendly  VA Dr's to help with your claim or fill out a DBQ..

 

Edited by Buck52
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There is my worry exactly.  Happened with the contract examiner on my last claim.  But feel Like a VA doctor will carry more weight when it comes to deciding a claim, It’s just a complete shot in the dark whether they will be on my side or not

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1 hour ago, Buck52 said:

so be careful asking these Veteran friendly  VA Dr's to help with your claim or fill out a DBQ..

The funny thing when I asked my PCM at Fort Eustis he told me that the VA is supposed to do DBQs. That is why I had to spend money out of my pocket to get one done. With that said the money I spent was well worth it since it helped to get my claim approved and a nice retro check.

JMO

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 You actually have 3 alternatives, and I always do number 3.    Its the most cost effective and does not "assume" just because they work for VA they wont help you, "even tho" that is true at least some of the time.  "Some" of the time VA docs are more than willing to help me.  The VA is not a unified body, so there is a continium of docs and their attitudes toward Veterans and their benfits.  The 3 alternatives are:  

1.  Go see a VA doc.  

2.  Go to a private doc.  

3.  "If" the VA exam is unfavorable, then go see a private doc.  

      Im very happy I didnt skip "number 1", as my VA doc is very Veteran friendly and provided exceptionally favorable evidence that was critical to win my claim.  But I will admit he is in the minority.  

    It should not hurt your claim if you use number 3.  

I didnt/dont worry about that, and you shouldnt either.  Worry never robs tommorrow of its sorrow only today of its happiness.  Its okay to think it through, go with the best alternative, but I recommend skipping the worrying.  

    Alternative number 2 is not completely a no brainer.  First, many private docs have no clue how to word a nexus statement.  If they say something like, "This COULD (or may) have been caused by military service", then that is still another negative evidence report, as Va considers "may" or "could" speculative and its negative.  

Edited by broncovet
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All I can say is what happens with one veteran may not happen to all or other veterans...the VA Dr's are different all around the nation .

if you can get a VA Dr to help you with your claim/claims like fill out the DBQ  then of course go for it.

  but not all VA Dr's will help, I know my MH Dr is not as veteran friendly to me now that I ask her to help me with my PTSD Claim..I still see her about every 3 months for Medication Check up..but she is not as friendly as she once was.

I always use a private Dr usually a specialist..if I pay good money to see a private specialist..I make sure he uses the VA Guidelines  and use the VA Language   like the VA likes  words like=   is at least likely as not   is likely as not related to or is caused by  ect,,ect,,,what ever the situation is.

When you use a Private Dr  and you use his IMO that record goes into your C-FILE And becomes a record with the VA. &  Make sure he is board certified and in the medicine field your claiming.

When you submit these private records to the VA they become the VA Property.

SO IT DON'T REALLY MATTER WHAT DR YOU USE  JUST AS LONG AS YOU HAVE ONE THAT IS GOING TO BE FAVORABLE TO YOUR CLAIM.

Edited by Buck52
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paulstrgn

Ain't that the truth...Actually it states on the DBQ who is qualified to fill out the DBQ...I Even pointed that out to her..she still refused to help.

so what does a Poor Veteran do when this happens.YOU GO SEE A PRIVATE DOCTOR  PREFERABLY A SPECIALIST.  

I Trully could not afford one at that time  so I went borrowed the damn money from my Bank...it was worth it .

I paid all that back After I got my retro,  before that I made like 10.00 month payments.

 

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Things have change since then..Now days when you go see a Dr  or Specialist  they only take Insurance  or credit cards...unlike just paying the Dr on the side..

.it does make it hard for the Veteran to use one of these Dr's  that work for a Group of Dr/s  they won't accept cash  and that sometimes is a problem.

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Good move Buck, I took a loan out for durable medical equipment when I was first disabled.  It took fifteen years for the VA to pay for the medical equipment but it was worth it at the time.  If you want it bad enough you will find a way.

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I agree with ya Vetquest!!!

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One way to get around an IMO is to make sure that when your symptoms are flaring up that you get to the VAMC/private doctor to get your symptoms reported in your progress reports.  Get those symptoms documented in your medical records. Basically creating a paper trail of your current conditions. Symptoms not treatment is the essence of any claim.  While being treated for your symptoms, the symptoms are just one part of the criteria for service connection and a part for an increase percentage. I guess I got lucky I never had to pay for an IMO but let your treatment records speak for themselves. Let your symptoms scream out loud in your medical records both VAMC and private doctors.

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