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    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
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  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

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    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

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Cavman

Ssd Taxable Income

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Is this right that we have to pay taxes on SSD if we file with our wife as married filing jointly? Also, if you are married and file separately do you have to claim your SSD?

Cavman

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Guest rickb54
Is this right that we have to pay taxes on SSD if we file with our wife as married filing jointly? Also, if you are married and file separately do you have to claim your SSD?

Cavman

If your wife works chances are your SSD is taxable... it will depend on how much she is making.

I don't think(but I am not sure) filing seperately will get you around the tax, plus if you have to pay any tax, it is likely to cost more by filing seperately. If you are retired military you should be able to go on base and use the free tax filing service, they should be able to answer the question with some authority.

Oh.. you can also download all the tax forms and tax instructions for the irs.... that is were I used to get my tax stuff..cause I used to file my own taxes....

Edited by rickb54

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SSD is taxable once you meet a 32,000 threshold when married I think it is after 16,000. In either case it is when any income including the Social Security goes over.

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SSD is taxable once you meet a 32,000 threshold when married I think it is after 16,000. In either case it is when any income including the Social Security goes over.

what about comp. i heard it was not to be included in the total ... like comp. is ? and then SSD is ? do you have to add the comp to the figure or not????? am i wrong?

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VA Comp is not taxable and not reportable to the IRS

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