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Berta

Agent Orange Awareness Day Aug 10,2020

Question

simmons_rf-2.jpgThis is the first time VVMF has honored this day as Agent Orange Awareness Day. 

 

If you are a Gold Star Wife or Gold Star Husband, check your email for their announcement on this day. My husband's photo above is on line with info on others who are honored in a special plaque on the Wall.

I found it on line today  at the VVMF site,and it still hurts to know he is gone. He was an altar boy in Middleton,NJ and the rest of the photo shows him with his mother, in front of their house , and was taken one week before he left for USMC. 1964. His hair had  began to turn white after he his discharge from USMC , 1968.

 

While their names are not on The Wall, they are never forgotten. On the Vietnam Veterans Memorial site in Washington, D.C., a special plaque reads: “In Memory of the men and women who served in the Vietnam War and later died as a result of their service. We honor and remember their sacrifice.” Click to learn about the In Memory program.

https://www.vvmf.org/In-Memory-Program/

 

In Memory was created in 1993 by the group – Friends of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. VVMF began managing the program and hosting the ceremony in 1999. More than 4,700 veterans have been added to the In Memory Honor Roll since the program began. To see all the honorees, please visit the In Memory Honor Roll.

https://www.vvmf.org/In-Memory-Program/

The relationship of the VVMF  to the Wall is here:

https://www.vvmf.org/About-The-Wall/  It is an overwhelming site. I was there the day after the dedication and the Mall in DC was still filled with thousands of Vietnam veterans , and their families at the Wall .

A tracing from the Wall can be used for a PTSD claim, if one of your stressors was seeing a unit buddy killed in Vietnam.

And dont miss the Moving Wall either- https://www.truckload.org/news/transport-the-wall-that-heals-in-2020/

But I believe their schedule has been affected by the Covid Virus- but Maybe not-------

 

 

 

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I think its Great they/we honor these men and women who  eventually lost their lives because of a condition cause from their military service.

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