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  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

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Guest rickb54

Sen Craig Wants Nsc Vets To Pay At Lease $250. Year For Va Medical Care.

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Guest rickb54

REPUBLICAN PRESS RELEASE

February 13, 2007

CRAIG USES IDAHO EXAMPLE AT TODAY’S VA BUDGET HEARING

Puts Bush VA health care plan in perspective

Media contact: Jeff Schrade (202)224-9093

(Washington, DC) Military veterans who used to work for Idaho’s Boise Cascade corporation became part of the debate today regarding a Bush Administration proposal for VA health care. The administration’s record setting $86.7 billion plan for VA health care next year proposes charging a new health care premium to veterans who make more than $50,000 a year and who also have no current disabling conditions from their military service.

The plan calls for charging them $250 a year to access VA’s health care system. Those making $75,000 or more would pay $500 a year and those making $100,000 or more would pay $750 a year.

"I know many Senators have come out – once again – against the President’s premium proposals in this budget. I, on the other hand, am one that finds these premiums to be a very reasonable price for access to what is widely hailed as the best health care system in America. Politicians talk about affordable quality healthcare. Well, here it is." said Sen. Larry Craig, the Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs.

"I often talk to those priority 8 veterans who, for purposes of this discussion, I'll call ‘the old Boise-Cascaders.’ These are veterans in their late 40s and 50s who once worked for Boise-Cascade. Unfortunately, the decline in the timber industry in the country shoved them off the roles of a large company’s health insurance plan. They are now working for small businesses – construction, electrical work, local stores, etc…. And they can’t afford health insurance on their salary, and their employers don't provide it.

"The average cost of an individual health insurance premium is in this country today; $4,242. This is what a Boise-Cascader is faced with paying," Craig said. "I cannot think of anyone of them with a family income of at least $50,000, and without any other health insurance options, who wouldn’t welcome the opportunity to enroll for VA health care at $21 per month. Perhaps some of our VA patients who have other health insurance will choose not to pay multiple premiums for multiple plans. And, if they do so, maybe I can one day look at Idaho’s Boise-Cascaders and tell some of them, I have an affordable, quality health care option for you! But I can also look at Idaho's taxpayers and say we've provided this option without busting the Federal budget."

My Opinion:

Actually $250.00 a year is reasonable. Retired Veterans pay $230.00 year to use Tricare... what is the difference?

Edited by rickb54

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What is wrong is the principle. When I was drafted in 1968 the Army made promises and I was paid 92 dollars a month with room and board. Many forget the sacrifices made by Veterans and their families.

Those guys who retire from Boise Cascade made a good living.

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Guest Dataman

Actually $250.00 a year is reasonable. Retired Veterans pay $230.00 year to use Tricare... what is the difference?

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Guest rickb54
[ but you pay 98 bucks a month for Medicare Part B instead.

yes this is true, but everyone on medicare is paying the same price, it is a fair system across he board.

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Just my opinion - I spent 25 years serving our country. Promises were made to me about health and dental care - However, they did not come through so now I pay almost 500 bucks a year for family health care which I think is a good deal. My friends in the private sector pay anywhere from 2500 to 4000 per year plus very expensive copays. Based upon this I feel the Govt held true on the promise to me on health care. Now dental is another thing - it sucks and is expensive.

Now for veterans - co-pays based upon salary is a good thing. Take me for example. I am SCed for a few items which if I decided to use the VA health care system they would cover at 100 percent. But why should they? Although I struggle with my disabilities daily, I have a very good job which rewards me with a very good salary. So what would be wrong with me having to pay a small enrollment fee to access 100 percent coverage of all my medical care?

I only support this because my being capable of paying the enrollment fee may, just may allow the system to cover another vet who is not as forunate as I am. You know with the rising costs of health care the system will one day run out of money and may not be there for any of us and I do not want to see that.

If you are 100 percent and drawing SSD then I say no enrollment fee. If you are 10, 50 or 100 percent schedular, working and make xxxx amount of dollars then I feel you should pay these small enrollment fees so the totally free care can go to vets that do not/can not work. Same goes for Non SC'ed guys - whats wrong with paying a small fee to have access to a 100 percent coverage medical plan? Maybe it would assist in cutting out some of the long wait times at hospitals some complain about. The key here would be that the funds would have to be returned directly back into the health care system. My mother-in-law who worked 28 years at a nursing home, draws 801.00 per month SS and she has to pay 1200.00 a year for health care and that don't include her co-pays or drugs. Now she has had a supplemental plan for years to cover drugs and co-pays but she pays 187.00 per month for that so her total out put for health care coverage is almost 3600.00 per year. Now this don't mean much cause I can not compare her to a vet, but it makes me jump with joy knowing that my entire family is covered for a little less than 500.00 per year. Even if I was not retired from service having to pay the va 250.00 per year for total health care coverage would be a blessing compared to her.

Same with meds - if you make x amount of salary then whats wrong with paying 25 bucks a month for 5000.00 dollars worth of meds?

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