Jump to content
Using an Ad Blocker? Consider adding HadIt.com as an exception. Hadit.com is funded through advertising, ad free memberships, contributions and out of pocket. ×
  • 0

Legit Organizations To Help with Filing Claim from 90% to 100%


Top G

Question

** Edited:  Included my VA decision letter from 2009 with medical descriptions and percentages awarded.

I'm a Service-Connected Disability Rating of 90% with just over 20-years of active duty in the USMC.  I've been retired since 2009 with my 90% rating ever since.  Since then, some of my documented rating disabilities have worsened.  The ringing in my left ear has worsened to the point the ringing is always there and loud enough to where it makes it difficult to concentrate.  My grenade concussion that caused me to lose eyesight for a short period of time back in the 90s....I believe has caused for me to have a torn retina a few years ago as the concussion may have weakened my retina.  Recently had 2 stents implanted, diabetes, shoulder pain has worsened making it harder to sleep on my sides....and on and on.  Over 20-years of active duty in Combat Arms and in combat sure does wear a body down...

So, I'm now looking to seek a higher compensation to 100% P&T.

I have previously reached out to the DAV and another organization...can't recall the name...but no forward momentum on either for assistance.  Now, I'm considering other organizations that will charge me money to help...like 360 Veteran.  Don't know of others, but I'm to a point to where I feel I should be rated at a higher rating than where I have been since 2009.

Interested in hearing from those of you who have gone to other agencies/organizations for assistance in filing VA disability claims to raise your previous rating.

Thank you all.

Pages from 2009 - VA Decision Letter_Redacted_Page_2.png

Pages from 2009 - VA Decision Letter_Redacted_Page_1.png

Edited by Top G
Updated with VA decision letter from 2009.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Top G   If you can’t do it on your own. I would go to different Law firms and talk to them about your disability’s. Who did your, a original claims and what did they say. 90% could be (85) or (94) VA Maths or in between. One thing is that, you are the person that has the most skin in the game so do your research. Get someone that has access to (VBMS) so they can see your claim in real time. Simper Fi Brother

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

Begin this by researching 38 CFR to find what the rating tables say about your conditions. Also check your actual rating list on va.gov and run those numbers through a VA disability calculator. It is good to know how far you actually need to go to get to 100%. If you are rated 85% they round up, or if you are 94% then it is rounded down. Should be easier to hit 100% if they rounded down. Reality is that you need to hit 95% to round up because in this system the only way you can actually get 100% is if you have 1 condition rated at 100%. The fractional system for multiple conditions will never hit 100%.

When you ID the ratable info, compare the ratings with what your current conditions are. If you got worse, then you know what needs to be documented to get that increase. Check your current medical records to see if this is documented or if you need to get it documented through your primary care provider. X-rays, MRI's and hearing tests, and anything else you need can be requested by your PCP if you give them reason to evaluate the severity of the condition. Example would be to go to your PCP and complain about the hearing problem, you should be referred to the ENT (ear, nose, throat) specialist or similar. They will do the workup. Tell them what your hearing was like before and how it is worse today, and they should document your current condition. Look at that and see if it takes you over the hump for a higher rating. 

Do the same/similar with other conditions you have. After you do this, then gather your documentation and write a lay statement to support the request. Lay statements are not medical opinion, but instead eye witness to how your condition affects your behavior and abilities. Get additional lay statements that confirm what your daily behavior is like/has change over xx years/months/weeks from family, workmates, and friends. Lay statements can sway the decision if it is close to equipoise then they will push it in your favor.

Gather all of this together, reference everything by date/time or page/paragraph in your lay statement that supports your claim so that the rating official can find it easily. Then submit your claim for increase.

Edited by pwrslm
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
47 minutes ago, pwrslm said:

Begin this by researching 38 CFR to find what the rating tables say about your conditions. Also check your actual rating list on va.gov and run those numbers through a VA disability calculator. It is good to know how far you actually need to go to get to 100%. If you are rated 85% they round up, or if you are 94% then it is rounded down. Should be easier to hit 100% if they rounded down. Reality is that you need to hit 95% to round up because in this system the only way you can actually get 100% is if you have 1 condition rated at 100%. The fractional system for multiple conditions will never hit 100%.

When you ID the ratable info, compare the ratings with what your current conditions are. If you got worse, then you know what needs to be documented to get that increase. Check your current medical records to see if this is documented or if you need to get it documented through your primary care provider. X-rays, MRI's and hearing tests, and anything else you need can be requested by your PCP if you give them reason to evaluate the severity of the condition. Example would be to go to your PCP and complain about the hearing problem, you should be referred to the ENT (ear, nose, throat) specialist or similar. They will do the workup. Tell them what your hearing was like before and how it is worse today, and they should document your current condition. Look at that and see if it takes you over the hump for a higher rating. 

Do the same/similar with other conditions you have. After you do this, then gather your documentation and write a lay statement to support the request. Lay statements are not medical opinion, but instead eye witness to how your condition affects your behavior and abilities. Get additional lay statements that confirm what your daily behavior is like/has change over xx years/months/weeks from family, workmates, and friends. Lay statements can sway the decision if it is close to equipoise then they will push it in your favor.

Gather all of this together, reference everything by date/time or page/paragraph in your lay statement that supports your claim so that the rating official can find it easily. Then submit your claim for increase.

Thank you for the informative information and links.  I've also updated my initial post with my 2009 VA decision letter so you and others can see where they rated me.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Answer this question...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • veteranscrisisline-badge-chat-1.gif

  • Advertisemnt

  • How to get your questions answered...

    question-001.jpeg

    All VA Claims questions should be posted on our forums. Read the forums without registering, to post you must register it’s free. Register for a free account.

    Tips on posting on the forums.

    1. Post a clear title like ‘Need help preparing PTSD claim’ or “VA med center won’t schedule my surgery” instead of ‘I have a question’.
    2. Knowledgable people who don’t have time to read all posts may skip yours if your need isn’t clear in the title. I don’t read all posts every login and will gravitate towards those I have more info on.
    3. Use paragraphs instead of one huge, rambling introduction or story. Again – You want to make it easy for others to help. If your question is buried in a monster paragraph there are fewer who will investigate to dig it out.

    Leading to:

    Post clear questions and then give background info on them.

    Examples:

    • A. I was previously denied for apnea – Should I refile a claim?
      • was diagnosed with apnea in service and received a CPAP machine but claim was denied in 2008. Should I refile?
    • B. I may have PTSD- how can I be sure?
      • I was involved in traumatic incident on base in 1974 and have had nightmares ever since, but I did not go to mental health while enlisted. How can I get help?

    This gives members a starting point to ask clarifying questions like “Can you post the Reasons for Denial from your claim?” etc.

    Note:

    Your firsts posts on the board may be delayed before they show up, as they are reviewed, this process does not take long and the review requirement will be removed usually by the 6th post, though we reserve the right to keep anyone on moderator preview.

    This process allows us to remove spam and other junk posts before they hit the board. We want to keep the focus on VA Claims and this helps us do that.

  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

    tinnitus-005.pngptsd-005.pnglumbosacral-005.pngscars-005.pnglimitation-flexion-knee-005.pngdiabetes-005.pnglimitation-motion-ankle-005.pngparalysis-005.pngdegenerative-arthitis-spine-005.pngtbi-traumatic-brain-injury-005.png

  • Advertisemnt

  • VA Watchdog

  • Advertisemnt

  • Ads

  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

    employment 2.jpeg

    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

{terms] and Guidelines