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I'm going to ask a stupid question


Remisdad

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I am going to go out here and guess and say that you were not on base or doing anything with the military?

I would assume it would be a no, but tell us what happened and maybe there is someone here who has a better answer? 

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In 1971 I transferred from the Active Army to the active Texas Army National guard for 4 years and then was placed in the IRR in 74 or 75 until I received another full honorable discharge from all Army forces as a CW2 in 1982. 

During this time from 75 to 82 I was never called to active duty although Reagan tried to call me up as a CWO helicopter pilot for his little wars in the Persian Gulf and South America.  His Secretary of Defense had no luck there as I ask for and received a total discharge from everything and resigned my Warrant Officer Commission or Appointment.

During my last 40 years of doing my claims myself and reading tons of Army and VA rules, regulations it is my clear understanding that you had to incur an injury or illness while called to active duty in the Reserves or Guard including but not limited to  active duty for annual two week training.  The key words are Active Duty.

However, in recent wars in the Middle East the DOD has relied heavily on the reserves and guard to fight those wars so things may have changed from my years with the Army, Guard and reserves.

When all was said and done I received a total of 4 honorable discharges as EM and WO from Army, Guard, and Reserves.

Others should be able to confirm or add more info to my comment.

Edited by Dustoff 11
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It should have said inactive ready reserve instead of individual ready reserve. Sorry about that. I just saw on the va app that my military service included my inactive ready reserve time so I was just curious. 

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I believe Individual Ready Reserves do allow for benefits based on page 12 in this PDF https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiTp_bJn_r2AhVPIDQIHUBaAhUQFnoECBAQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.hrc.army.mil%2Fasset%2F19023&usg=AOvVaw3b_jdBI4ft2O7b3cW3XWKt

I think inactive reserve the answer is no.

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I found this info directly from present day VA Benefits website.  See VA link below. Again they use the key words Active Duty applying to both Guard and Reserves.  This VA info came from VA link on page 12 of T Bird's PDF.

Reserve: Active

Reserve members who serve on active duty qualify for many VA benefit programs, including those who serve as part of the Active Guard Reserve.

Learn more about your Reserve National Guard VA benefits, such as Education, Home Loans, Disability Compensation, and Pension.

 

National Guard: Active

National Guard members performing active service where pay is received from the Federal government may qualify for many VA benefits. This could be active duty under Title 10 or full-time National Guard duty under Title 32, to include performing full-time duties as an Active Guard Reserve member.

Learn more about your Active National Guard VA benefits, such as Education, Home Loans, Disability Compensation, and Pension.

National Guard and Reserve Home (va.gov)

There is the IRR, Selected Reserve, Standby Reserve and Ready Reserve in addition to National Guard.  As far as I know according to DD214 I was only a member of non active IRR and a member of the active Army Guard and previous Active Army as both EM and CWO.

Edited by Dustoff 11
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