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Ks - Kansas Veterans Benefits

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State of Kansas Department of Veterans Affairs

Disability Benefits

Disability Compensation: The KCVA can assist you in filing the forms for Disability Compensation for service connected disability determinations.

Disability Pension: The KCVA can assist you in filing the necessary forms for Disability Pension.

Basic entitlement for a veteran exists if the veteran is disabled as the result of a personal injury or disease (including aggravation of a condition existing prior to service) while in active service if the injury or the disease was incurred or aggravated in line of duty.

Time Limits: There is no deadline for applying for disability benefits.

Dependents' and Survivors' Benefits

Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) is payable to certain survivors of:

Service members who died on active duty

Veterans who died from service-related disabilities

Certain veterans who were being paid 100% VA disability compensation at time of death.

The State of Kansas can assist you in completing these eligibility forms.

Death Pension is payable to some surviving spouses and children of deceased wartime veterans. The benefit is based on financial need.

Burial Benefits

Headstones and Markers: The State of Kansas can furnish a monument to mark the unmarked grave of an eligible veteran if not covered by the federal government.

Presidential Memorial Certificate (PMC): The State of Kansas can complete a request to provide a PMC for eligible recipients.

Burial Flag: The United States Post Office or the State of Kansas through the Kansas Veterans' Affairs Commission can provide an American flag to drape over an eligible veteran's casket.

Reimbursement of Burial Expenses: The State of Kansas can assist in completing the forms necessary to receive a burial allowance of $2,000 for veterans who die of service-related causes. For certain other veterans, the VA can pay $300 for burial and funeral expenses and $300 for a burial plot.

Burial in a National or State Veterans Cemetery: Most veterans, spouses and some dependents can be buried in a national cemetery or one of the three state veterans cemeteries at no cost to the veteran or their family.

Time Limits: There is no time limit for claiming reimbursement of burial expenses for a service-related death. In other cases, claims must be filed within 2 years of the veteran's burial.

Health Care

The State of Kansas can assist you in becoming eligible for the following services:

Hospital, outpatient medical, dental, pharmacy and prosthetic services

Domiciliary, nursing home, and community-based residential care including two state veterans' homes offering both domiciliary and nursing home care available to veterans and dependents

Sexual trauma counseling

Specialized health care for women veterans

Health and rehabilitation programs for homeless veterans

Readjustment counseling

Alcohol and drug dependency treatment

Medical evaluation for military service exposure, including Gulf War, Agent Orange, radiation, or other environmental hazards

Combat Veterans- the VA will provide combat veterans free medical care for any illness possibly associated with service against a hostile force in a war after the Gulf War or during a period of hostility after November 11, 1998. This benefit may be provided for two years from the veteran's release from active duty.

Veterans Affairs Administration Civilian Health and Medical Program (CHAMPVA) shares the cost of medical services for eligible dependents and survivors of certain veterans.

TRICARE eligibility is determined by the various branches of the uniformed services and much like its predecessor shares the cost of medical services for eligible dependents and survivors of certain veterans.

Time Limits: There are no time limits for applying for the benefits described above.

Education & Training

Benefits to eligible veterans, dependents, reservists, and service members while they are in an approved training program to include approved university, high school, on the job training and apprenticeship. The State of Kansas can assist you in applying for and approving your participation in these major programs:

Montgomery GI Bill: Persons who first entered active duty after June 30, 1985, are generally eligible. Some Vietnam Era veterans and certain veterans separated under special programs are also eligible. The bill also includes a program for certain reservists and National Guard members.

Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP): This program is for veterans who entered active duty for the first time after December 31, 1976, and before July 1, 1985, and contributed funds to this program.

Kansas National Guard scholarships: available for people who desire a commission in the National Guard.

Survivors' & Dependents' Educational Assistance: Some family members of disabled or deceased veterans are eligible for education benefits.

Time Limits: Generally, veterans have 10 years from the date they were last released from active duty to use their education benefits. Reservists generally have 10 years from the date they became eligible for the program unless they leave the Selected Reserves before completing their obligation. Spouses generally have 10 years from the date the VA first determines them eligible. Children are generally eligible from age 18 until age 26. These time limits can sometimes be extended.

Home Loans

The State of Kansas can assistance in locating approved lenders and completing applications for loan guarantees.

The VA and local banks offer a number of home loan services to eligible veterans, some military personnel, and certain spouses.

Guaranteed Loans: the VA can guarantee part of a loan from a private lender to help you buy a home, a manufactured home, a lot for a manufactured home, or certain types of condominiums. The VA also guarantees loans for building, repairing, and improving homes.

Refinancing Loans: If you have a VA mortgage, the VA can help you refinance your loan at a lower interest rate. You may also refinance a non-VA loan.

Special Grants: Certain disabled veterans and military personnel can receive grants to adapt or acquire housing suitable for their needs.

Time Limits: There is no time limit for a VA home loan, except for eligible reservists. Their eligibility expires September 30, 2009.

Life Insurance

Servicemembers Group Life Insurance

Servicemembers Group Life Insurance(SGLI) is low-cost term life insurance for service members and reservists. Generally, coverage begins when you enter the service. It is available in amounts up to $250,000. Generally, it expires 120 days after you get out of the service. The State of Kansas will cover the cost of this life insurance up to $250,000 for members of the Kansas National Guard while on Federal active duty in a combat area.

Veterans Group Life Insurance

Veterans Group Life Insurance (VGLI) is renewable five-year term life insurance for veterans. It is available in amounts up to $250,000. You may apply any time within 1 year from the date your SGLI expires.

Service-Disabled Veterans Insurance

Service-Disabled Veterans Insurance, also called "RH" Insurance, is life insurance for service-disabled veterans. The basic coverage is $10,000. If your premium payments for the basic policy are waived, due to total disability, you may be eligible for a supplemental policy of up to $20,000. Generally, you have 2 years after being notified of your service-connected disability to apply for basic coverage.

Filing Claims

In order for benefits of any type to be paid, appropriate claim form(s) must be filed with the VA. Assistance is provided through the KCVA in completing these forms and obtaining supporting records and documents to include military medical records, marriage certificates, death certificates, birth certificates, etc. at no cost to the veteran.

The KCVA office nearest you can assist you in filing claims. Click this link: KCVA OFFICES

Appealing Claims

Veterans and other claimants for VA benefits have the right to appeal decisions made by a VA regional office. The KCVA in partnership with national service organizations like the American Legion, Disabled American Veterans and the Veteran's of Foreign Wars represent veterans throughout the appeals process.

Medals

The State of Kansas provides assistance to veterans in applying for service medals listed on their DD Form 214.

DD Form 214

The State of Kansas maintains DD Form 214 files on veterans released from service and showing Kansas as their home of record. Copies of DD Form 214's from 1988 to Present may be immediately available in the Kansas Commission on Veterans Affairs central office. The State of Kansas' Adjutant General's Department has an Archives Office, (785) 274-1099, which can provide the following records of service: From 1946 to 1991, DD Form 214's for all branches of the service are available; a Statement of Service on World War II, 1941 -1946; and Kansas National Guard records from 1946 to the present. As required by the Privacy Act and to obtain a copy of DD Form 214, a formal request must be submitted to the Kansas Army National Guard by using Standard Form 180 (1 MB PDF). The completed and signed Standard Form 180 should be mailed to The Adjutant General's Department, Attn: Archives, 2800 S. Topeka Blvd., Topeka, KS 66611-1287 or by fax to (785) 274-1004.

The State's Kansas State Historical Society, has military records which include some of the following:

Territorial

Civil War

Indian Campaigns

Spanish American War

World War I and II

Contact: (785) 272-8681 x117. Download the request for a copy of the DD 214 here (1 MB PDF).

On-Line DD-214 ACCESS

The National Personnel Records Center has provided the following web site for veterans to access their DD-214 online: http://vetrecs.archives.gov

This may be particularly helpful when a veteran needs a copy of his DD-214 for employment purposes. Please see the details below.

The National Personnel Records Center is working to make it easier for veterans with computers and Internet access to obtain copies of documents from their military files.

Military veterans and the next of kin of deceased former military members may now use a new online military personnel records system to request documents. Other individuals with a need for documents must still complete the Standard Form 180 which can be downloaded from the online web site.

The new web-based application was designed to provide better service on these requests by eliminating the records center's mailroom processing time.

Also, because the requester will be asked to supply all information essential for NPRC to process the request, delays that normally occur when NPRC has to ask veterans for additional information will be minimized.

Veterans and next of kin may access this application at http://vetrecs.archives.gov

Prescription Drug Coverage

The State of Kansas can assist in completing the application process to determine eligibility for VA provided medications for certain high priority veterans, including those with low incomes (below VA pension thresholds). Eligible veterans can receive free prescriptions or may be eligible for medications with a low co-payment.

Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment

The State of Kansas, through the Department of Commerce, can help veterans with service-connected disabilities prepare for, find and keep suitable employment. Contact: (785) 296-5202.

The State of Kansas through the Kansas Commission on Veterans' Affairs can assist veterans with serious service-connected disabilities in applying through the VA for services to improve their ability to live as independently as possible. Some of the services provided are:

Job Search: Assistance in finding and maintaining suitable employment

Vocational Evaluation: An evaluation of abilities, skills, interests, and needs

Career Exploration: Vocational counseling and planning

Vocational Training: If needed, training such as on-the-job and non-paid work experience

Education Training: If needed, education training to accomplish the rehabilitation goal

Rehabilitation Service: Supportive rehabilitation and counseling services

Time Limits: You generally have 12 years from the date the VA notifies you in writing that you have at least a 10 percent rating for a service-connected disability.

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