Jump to content
Ads Keep HadIt.com Online. Consider Turning Off Ad Blockers to Keep HadIt.com Online! ×
  • 0

Respite Care


Guest Morgan

Question

I got a call from the RO offering "time out" from health care duties. The director of the program explained that this program offers 30 days annual respite care for the caregiver of a chronically ill vet. Based on bed availability, a veteran even can be admitted to a VA hospital for up to 7 days (non-medical stay) while the caregiver takes a break. I had never heard of this before I was offered the benefit, so thought others might need to know.

T-1

Department of Veterans Affairs M-5, Part VII

Veterans Health Administration Chapter 1

Washington, DC 20420

March 3, 1995

FOREWORD

This manual chapter promulgates the policies and procedures for implementation of the Respite Care Programs of Deaprtment of Veterans Affairs health care facilities throughout the country.

M-5, Part VII March 3, 1995

March 3, 1995 M-5, Part VII

Chapter 1

1-i

CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1. RESPITE CARE

PARAGRAPH PAGE

1.01 Purpose ................................................................................

................................1-1

1.02 Policy ................................................................................

...................................1-1

1.03 Definition ................................................................................

..............................1-1

1.04 Scope ................................................................................

...................................1-1

1.05 Responsibility ................................................................................

........................1-2

1.06 Admission Guidelines......................................................................

........................1-3

1.07 Termination of Respite Care............................................................................

....... 1-3

Chapter 1

1-1

CHAPTER 1. RESPITE CARE

1.01 PURPOSE

a. This chapter defines the role of respite care within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA).

b. It is generally recognized that most chronically ill persons who do not need hospital services can be most effectively cared for, if, through the assistance of family or other members of the household, they are able to live at home. At the same time, there is recognition that such arrangements for care of a patient at home may place severe physical and emotional burdens on the caregiver and the household.

c. The clinical objective of providing institutionally based respite care is to support the caregiver's role in caring for the chronically ill veteran at home. A critical element of respite is planning in advance for the benefit of the caregiver, rather than being incidental to the provision of necessary medical care of the patient.

1.02 POLICY

Title 38 United States Code (U.S.C.) Section 1720B authorizes the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide institutional respite care without affecting other eligibility criteria.

1.03 DEFINITION

Respite care means medical center or nursing home care, which is:

(1) Of limited duration;

(2) Furnished in a medical facility on an intermittent basis to a veteran who is suffering from a chronic illness and who resides primarily at home; and

(3) Furnished for the purpose of helping the veteran to continue residing primarily at home.

1.04 SCOPE

a. VA medical centers may provide respite care to an eligible veteran for up to 30 days in a calendar year. Families and patients who are in need of respite care in excess of 30 days because of unforeseen difficulties, such as the unexpected death of the caregiver, may, with the approval of the medical center Director, furnish additional days of care.

b. VA medical centers are not authorized to provide respite care:

(1) In an Ambulatory Care Program;

(2) In domiciliary beds;

(3) Through contractual agreements; or

(4) In the home. NOTE: This is not intended to preclude the possible need to develop a program using

volunteers and/or community resources to provide intermittent respite in the home.

M-5, Part VII March 3, 1995

Chapter 1

1-2

c. Patients considered for admission will be admitted based on eligibility and admission priorities as outlined in M-1, Part I, Chapters 4 and 12. Beds will not be dedicated for respite care.

d. When a treatment team determines that respite care services are indicated to support the caregiver's role in caring for the chronically ill veteran at home, then the service will be provided at that medical center.

1.05 RESPONSIBILITY

a. A medical center policy will be developed by each medical center to identify how the Respite Care Program will operate and who is responsible.

b. The medical center Director has overall responsibility for the Respite Care Program. The Chief of Staff (COS), the Associate Chief of Staff (ACOS) for Geriatrics and Extended Care, or the ACOS for Ambulatory Care has programmatic responsibility.

c. A Respite Care Coordinator will be appointed by the COS, or designee, and will be accountable for the operation and management of the program.

(1) The coordinator must have demonstrated ability and competence in both patient care and/or program administration.

(2) The Respite Care Coordinator is responsible for:

a Coordinating referrals;

b Coordinating admissions; and

c Orienting the patient and caregiver to the Respite Care Program.

d. An interdisciplinary team will be responsible for screening the patient and formulating the respite care treatment plan for the patient, including frequency, duration and recommendation for patient activities while in the medical center or nursing home care unit (NHCU).

(1) The Adult Day Health Care (ADHC), Hospital Based Home Care (HBHC), Mental Health, and VA NHCU interdisciplinary teams may serve in this capacity.

(2) Otherwise, the interdisciplinary team will be composed of the physician primarily responsible for the patient's care, a nurse, and the social worker assigned the Respite Care Program responsibility.

NOTE: The treatment plan should be developed in conjunction with the primary caregiver.

e. The physician member of the patient's interdisciplinary team will be responsible for or will supervise the respite care of the patient. The physician along with the team members will ensure that there is coordination between the existing outpatient and/or home treatment plan and the respite care treatment plan.

(1) The respite care treatment plan can include the following:

Drug review,

Drug management,

Mental health intervention,

March 3, 1995 M-5, Part VII

Chapter 1

1-3

(d) Physical therapy,

(e) Occupational therapy,

(f) Corrective therapy,

(g) Recreation therapy,

(h) Speech therapy,

(i) Manual arts therapy, and

(j) Intravenous (IV) administration.

(2) The respite care treatment plan mandates there will not be any self-administered medication.

1.06 ADMISSION GUIDELINES

The following guidelines define admission criteria:

a. The patient's caregiver is in need of relief from the day to day patient care tasks.

b. The patient is suffering from a chronic illness and/or has a prolonged recuperation from surgery or an injury incurred from an accident.

c. The patient must be determined eligible for medical center or nursing home care under 38 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 17.47. NOTE: Eligibility criteria are published in M-1, Part I, Chapters 4 and 12.

d. Respite care, as a form of medical center or nursing home care, will follow the same priorities that are used for all hospital and nursing home care. In accordance with 38 CFR 17.49, the Under Secretary for Health has established priorities for admission to hospital and nursing home care. These priorities are published in M-1, Part I, Chapter 4.

e. Patients admitted directly from the community and not currently known to VA will have a physical assessment completed immediately.

1.07 TERMINATION OF RESPITE CARE

Termination from respite care will occur when the patient is:

a. Released to the caregiver (home), or

b. Transferred to another level of care because the:

(1) Caregiver will no longer be able to provide care to the patient;

(2) Patient becomes acutely ill; or

(3) Patient becomes terminally ill and the anticipation of death prevents discharge from hospital or nursing home care.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Answers 4
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters For This Question

Popular Days

Top Posters For This Question

4 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

That would be a great program, but my wife doesn't trust the VA as far as she can throw them and there is no way I could get her into a VA program...does anyone know if they offer something similar for medicare/tricare or if the VA will pay for a civilian hospital stay? God knows I could use a week off:-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jay,

I'm not sure how this works exactly, as I am just now walking through the process. But this program also works on an outpatient basis through any home health agency that offers respite care aides for short time outs. The director told me I could schedule some of the days as "three-hour outings" (which count as one of the 30 days, even though it's only three hours) to give me time to just take a walk in the park and relax, knowing my husband is safe while I'm out.

My dad had three strokes recently (half a nation away) and I couldn't go to see him because I didn't have anyone who could take care of my husband. I didn't know about this program then, but it would have been nice to go to my dad for a week.

The inpatient program simply offers a safe place for the veteran to stay overnight, meals, medication management, etc., while allowing time for an emergent matter or just a breather for the caregiver at no extra cost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jay,

I'm not sure how this works exactly, as I am just now walking through the process. But this program also works on an outpatient basis through any home health agency that offers respite care aides for short time outs. The director told me I could schedule some of the days as "three-hour outings" (which count as one of the 30 days, even though it's only three hours) to give me time to just take a walk in the park and relax, knowing my husband is safe while I'm out.

My dad had three strokes recently (half a nation away) and I couldn't go to see him because I didn't have anyone who could take care of my husband. I didn't know about this program then, but it would have been nice to go to my dad for a week.

The inpatient program simply offers a safe place for the veteran to stay overnight, meals, medication management, etc., while allowing time for an emergent matter or just a breather for the caregiver at no extra cost.

Wow, well thank you so much for the information and please keep me informed. It would be great if I could take the kids for a small vacation without having to stay indoors with the wife the whole time. This isn't to say that I don't love my wife, but we all need a break every once in awhile:-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jay,

Yes, you do need a break.

If you didn't love your wife you wouldn't be taking such good care of her. But you know, it's all right not to love the circumstances you have been dealt.

I know how hard chronic illness is on the caregiver as well as the one who is sick. I hope you get the much needed break soon.

I will let you know how this VA program works out for us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.


  • veterans-crisis-line.jpg
    The Veterans Crisis Line can help even if you’re not enrolled in VA benefits or health care.

    CHAT NOW

  • question-001.jpeg

    Have Questions? Get Answers.

    Tips on posting on the forums.

    1. Post a clear title like ‘Need help preparing PTSD claim’ or “VA med center won’t schedule my surgery instead of ‘I have a question.
       
    2. Knowledgeable people who don’t have time to read all posts may skip yours if your need isn’t clear in the title.
      I don’t read all posts every login and will gravitate towards those I have more info on.
       
    3. Use paragraphs instead of one massive, rambling introduction or story.
       
      Again – You want to make it easy for others to help. If your question is buried in a monster paragraph, there are fewer who will investigate to dig it out.
     
    Leading too:

    exclamation-point.pngPost straightforward questions and then post background information.
     
    Examples:
     
    • Question A. I was previously denied for apnea – Should I refile a claim?
      • Adding Background information in your post will help members understand what information you are looking for so they can assist you in finding it.
    Rephrase the question: I was diagnosed with apnea in service and received a CPAP machine, but the claim was denied in 2008. Should I refile?
     
    • Question B. I may have PTSD- how can I be sure?
      • See how the details below give us a better understanding of what you’re claiming.
    Rephrase the question: I was involved in a traumatic incident on base in 1974 and have had nightmares ever since, but I did not go to mental health while enlisted. How can I get help?
     
    This gives members a starting point to ask clarifying questions like “Can you post the Reasons for Denial of your claim?”
     
    Note:
     
    • Your first posts on the board may be delayed before they appear as they are reviewed. This process does not take long.
    • Your first posts on the board may be delayed before they appear as they are reviewed. The review requirement will usually be removed by the 6th post. However, we reserve the right to keep anyone on moderator preview.
    • This process allows us to remove spam and other junk posts before hitting the board. We want to keep the focus on VA Claims, and this helps us do that.
  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

    tinnitus-005.pngptsd-005.pnglumbosacral-005.pngscars-005.pnglimitation-flexion-knee-005.pngdiabetes-005.pnglimitation-motion-ankle-005.pngparalysis-005.pngdegenerative-arthitis-spine-005.pngtbi-traumatic-brain-injury-005.png

  • VA Watchdog

  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

    employment 2.jpeg

    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

{terms] and Guidelines