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  • 14 Questions about VA Disability Compensation Benefits Claims

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    When a Veteran starts considering whether or not to file a VA Disability Claim, there are a lot of questions that he or she tends to ask. Over the last 10 years, the following are the 14 most common basic questions I am asked about ...
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  • Most Common VA Disabilities Claimed for Compensation:   

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  • Can a 100 percent Disabled Veteran Work and Earn an Income?

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    You’ve just been rated 100% disabled by the Veterans Affairs. After the excitement of finally having the rating you deserve wears off, you start asking questions. One of the first questions that you might ask is this: It’s a legitimate question – rare is the Veteran that finds themselves sitting on the couch eating bon-bons … Continue reading

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    • How to get your questions answered...


      All VA Claims questions should be posted on our forums. Read the forums without registering, to post you must register it’s free. Register for a free account.

      Tips on posting on the forums.

      Post a clear title like ‘Need help preparing PTSD claim’ or “VA med center won’t schedule my surgery” instead of ‘I have a question’.


      Knowledgable people who don’t have time to read all posts may skip yours if your need isn’t clear in the title. I don’t read all posts every login and will gravitate towards those I have more info on.


      Use paragraphs instead of one huge, rambling introduction or story. Again – You want to make it easy for others to help. If your question is buried in a monster paragraph there are fewer who will investigate to dig it out.


      Leading to:

      Post clear questions and then give background info on them.

      Examples:

      A. I was previously denied for apnea – Should I refile a claim?


      I was diagnosed with apnea in service and received a CPAP machine but claim was denied in 2008. Should I refile?



      B. I may have PTSD- how can I be sure?

      I was involved in traumatic incident on base in 1974 and have had nightmares ever since, but I did not go to mental health while enlisted. How can I get help?



      This gives members a starting point to ask clarifying questions like “Can you post the Reasons for Denial from your claim?” etc.

      Note:

      Your firsts posts on the board may be delayed before they show up, as they are reviewed, this process does not take long and the review requirement will be removed usually by the 6th post, though we reserve the right to keep anyone on moderator preview.

      This process allows us to remove spam and other junk posts before they hit the board. We want to keep the focus on VA Claims and this helps us do that.
      • 1 reply
    • Exams that were being sent strictly to contractors before, due to VAMCs not being open, are starting to be routed back to VAMCs. This is going forward from last Friday- not sure if prior scheduled exams will be re-created for VAMC vs vendor.
      • 7 replies
    • Mere speculation in your VA C and P exam

      M21-1, Part III, Subpart iv, Chapter 3, Section D – Examination Reports III.iv.3.D.2.r. Examiner Statements that an Opinion Would be Speculative Pay careful attention to any conclusion by the examiner that an opinion could not be provided without resorting to mere speculation (or any similar language to that effect). VA may only accept a medical examiner’s … Continue reading
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    • A favor please - just changed servers so if you have a moment...
      A favor please - just changed servers so if you have a moment go to https://www.hadit.com I'd like to see how the server handles a lot of traffic. So if you have a moment click the link and i can see how things are going on the back end.
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    • It's time to ask for help from the community. If you can help with a gift it would be very appreciated.

      Fund HadIt.com Veteran to Veteran LLC


      Give a financial gift to help with the upkeep of HadIt.com. HadIt.com is NOT a non profit. Gifts are not tax deductible, they are just gifts. 
      • 11 replies
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*Bergie*

Household Hazards For People With Copd

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This article is full of good info that those with chronic lung disease (including asthma), should read.

Bergie

Many homes harbor dust, fumes, germs, and other irritants that aggravate COPD symptoms.

Smoking poses an enormous threat to the lungs of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) -- and no wonder. Tobacco smoke contains more than 4,000 chemicals, including 43 that are known to cause cancer. Outdoor air pollution is another significant threat.

But those are not the only threats to people with COPD, a lung disease that encompasses both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Many homes harbor dust, fumes, germs, and other irritants that aggravate COPD symptoms like wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. The risks are especially high in the 20% of COPD sufferers who also have allergies.

You might be surprised at some of the things around the house that can cause trouble. For example, some air filters that help rid the air of dust give off small amounts of ozone, an air pollutant that is a lung irritant.

“Ozone can certainly be problematic for people with COPD,” says Byron Thomashow, MD, professor of medicine at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City and chairman of the COPD Foundation. “That’s why I usually recommend HEPA filters,” which don’t give off ozone.

Here are nine other household hazards for people with COPD:

1. Air Ducts Filled With Dust

The forced-air heating and cooling systems found in many homes can blow dust and other irritants throughout the house. Cleaning the air ducts periodically can help alleviate this problem.

2. Carpets That Collect Dust and Dirt

Rugs and carpets are another major source of dust and dirt. “Every time you walk on a carpet or rug, you stir up a cloud of dust that you may or may not be able to see,” says Neil Schachter, MD, professor of medicine and community medicine and medical director of the respiratory care department at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

Wall-to-wall carpets cause more trouble than rugs, because they tend to be bigger (and therefore harbor more irritants) and harder to clean than rugs (which can simply be rolled up and taken to a cleaner). New carpets can be especially irritating, because they can “out-gas” formaldehyde and other noxious organic compounds for an extended period of time after installation.

The bottom line? “If someone in the house has COPD, bare wood floors are best,” says Schachter. To further minimize the threat posed by dust, leave shoes at the door and arrange to have someone who doesn’t have COPD dust, sweep, vacuum, etc.

3. Cleaning Products That Give Off Fumes

Oven cleaners, spray polish, and other household cleansers -- especially those that contain bleach or ammonia -- can be very irritating. “Anything that gives off fumes can cause problems -- bathroom cleaning products, in particular,” Thomashow says.

“Many people with COPD have a red, raw airway,” Schachter says. “If you breathe in the fumes from these products, you’re just fanning the flames.”

He recommends replacing fume-producing products with less-irritating “green” cleansers -- or relying on old-fashioned cleaning agents like soap and water, baking soda, and vinegar.

The room being cleaned should be well ventilated, and someone who doesn’t have COPD should wield the mop and scrub brush (and the person with COPD should steer clear until the job is done). After use, cleaning products should be tightly capped and put away.

If someone with COPD must use cleaning products, the COPD Foundation recommends wearing a respirator mask rated “N95” by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

4. Dry Cleaning Chemicals

Some people with COPD are sensitive to the odor of newly dry-cleaned garments. To avoid trouble, take the clothes out of the plastic and let them air out before putting them in your closet.

Alternatively, put them in a room with an open window -- and close the door. You might also look for a “green” dry cleaner that doesn’t use harsh chemicals.

5. Fireplaces and Wood Stoves

A roaring wood fire gives off light and warmth -- and all manner of irritating gases and sooty particulate matter.

“I generally recommend against using fireplaces,” Thomashow says, with a laugh. “Fake ones are OK.”

Schachter says, “Having a fire is like smoking a cigarette. I’m not saying do away completely with fires and candlelight dinners but to do everything in reason.”

One fire that should never be allowed to burn inside the home of someone with COPD: the one at the tip of a cigarette. “There can be no compromise with smoking,” Schachter says. “That is death.” Even passive smoking (exposure to someone else’s tobacco smoke) can be risky for people with COPD.

6. Moisture That Breeds Bacteria and Mold

From shower stalls to basements to that sponge left lying by the kitchen sink, sources of moisture in the home can promote the growth of bacteria and mold.

What can you do to stymie these irritants? Seal all leaks. Wipe up spills right away, and throw out water-damaged carpeting. Use fans to increase ventilation in bathrooms and kitchens. Replace kitchen and bath sponges frequently.

Pick up a humidity meter and take steps to keep indoor humidity below 40% -- for example, by running a dehumidifier or air conditioner.

7. Pet Dander and Dirt

Cats and dogs fill a home with love -- but also with irritating dirt and dander (bits of dry skin and hair).

Not eager to bid au revoir to Rover? Have him washed and groomed twice a month. And keep him out of your bedroom.

8. Showerheads That Harbor Mycobacteria

Recent research has shown that showerheads can harbor so-called “atypical mycobacteria.”

These germs are generally harmless to healthy people, but capable of causing a chronic, low-grade infection that brings coughing and shortness of breath in people with COPD.

Mycobacteria are also resistant to antibiotics, making them hard to eradicate.

To avoid trouble, Schachter recommends having showerheads cleaned (or replaced) twice a year.

9. Toiletries: Scented Soaps, Shampoos, Sprays

Some people with COPD are sensitive to scented soaps, shampoos, deodorants, hairsprays, and cosmetics. If that describes someone in your house, stick with unscented personal products -- and steer clear of perfume and cologne.

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  • Our picks

    • How to get your questions answered...


      All VA Claims questions should be posted on our forums. Read the forums without registering, to post you must register it’s free. Register for a free account.

      Tips on posting on the forums.

      Post a clear title like ‘Need help preparing PTSD claim’ or “VA med center won’t schedule my surgery” instead of ‘I have a question’.


      Knowledgable people who don’t have time to read all posts may skip yours if your need isn’t clear in the title. I don’t read all posts every login and will gravitate towards those I have more info on.


      Use paragraphs instead of one huge, rambling introduction or story. Again – You want to make it easy for others to help. If your question is buried in a monster paragraph there are fewer who will investigate to dig it out.


      Leading to:

      Post clear questions and then give background info on them.

      Examples:

      A. I was previously denied for apnea – Should I refile a claim?


      I was diagnosed with apnea in service and received a CPAP machine but claim was denied in 2008. Should I refile?



      B. I may have PTSD- how can I be sure?

      I was involved in traumatic incident on base in 1974 and have had nightmares ever since, but I did not go to mental health while enlisted. How can I get help?



      This gives members a starting point to ask clarifying questions like “Can you post the Reasons for Denial from your claim?” etc.

      Note:

      Your firsts posts on the board may be delayed before they show up, as they are reviewed, this process does not take long and the review requirement will be removed usually by the 6th post, though we reserve the right to keep anyone on moderator preview.

      This process allows us to remove spam and other junk posts before they hit the board. We want to keep the focus on VA Claims and this helps us do that.
      • 1 reply
    • Exams that were being sent strictly to contractors before, due to VAMCs not being open, are starting to be routed back to VAMCs. This is going forward from last Friday- not sure if prior scheduled exams will be re-created for VAMC vs vendor.
      • 7 replies
    • Mere speculation in your VA C and P exam

      M21-1, Part III, Subpart iv, Chapter 3, Section D – Examination Reports III.iv.3.D.2.r. Examiner Statements that an Opinion Would be Speculative Pay careful attention to any conclusion by the examiner that an opinion could not be provided without resorting to mere speculation (or any similar language to that effect). VA may only accept a medical examiner’s … Continue reading
      • 0 replies
    • A favor please - just changed servers so if you have a moment...
      A favor please - just changed servers so if you have a moment go to https://www.hadit.com I'd like to see how the server handles a lot of traffic. So if you have a moment click the link and i can see how things are going on the back end.
      • 11 replies
    • It's time to ask for help from the community. If you can help with a gift it would be very appreciated.

      Fund HadIt.com Veteran to Veteran LLC


      Give a financial gift to help with the upkeep of HadIt.com. HadIt.com is NOT a non profit. Gifts are not tax deductible, they are just gifts. 
      • 11 replies
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